Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouthern California Architecture
IN THE NEWS

Southern California Architecture

FEATURED ARTICLES
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Two years ago, when the Getty Trust helped organize and fund more than five dozen exhibits on 20th century art in Los Angeles, a massive enterprise it labeled "Pacific Standard Time," it wasn't difficult to guess which era the museum would focus on. It was clearly going to be the postwar period, and the 1950s, '60s and '70s in particular. There wasn't much of an art scene in L.A. in first half of the century, after all, and World War II itself, in a range of ways, helped fuel a transformative boom in both industrial and cultural production here.
Advertisement
MAGAZINE
August 30, 1992
Planner patois, courtesy of the "Plannerese Dictionary," published by the Inland Empire Section of the American Planning Assn. Architectural birth control: n. Limiting the number of children in a housing division by excluding dwellings with multiple bedrooms. Birds and bunnies: n. Environmentalists. "The birds and bunnies killed that development plan." California Nondescript: adj. Prevalent style of Southern California architecture. Grant gnats: n .
HOME & GARDEN
July 7, 2005 | Steven Barrie-Anthony, Times Staff Writer
The architectural history of the Southern California home is far too rich, innovative and colorful a narrative to fit neatly onto one newspaper page, but the following timeline gathers a variety of important milestones -- beginning with the establishment of the pueblo of Los Angeles in 1781 and continuing through the current-day designs of Frank Gehry and Thom Mayne -- into a quick retelling of a fascinating tale. 1781: Pueblo of Los Angeles is established.
HOME & GARDEN
July 7, 2005 | Steven Barrie-Anthony, Times Staff Writer
The architectural history of the Southern California home is far too rich, innovative and colorful a narrative to fit neatly onto one newspaper page, but the following timeline gathers a variety of important milestones -- beginning with the establishment of the pueblo of Los Angeles in 1781 and continuing through the current-day designs of Frank Gehry and Thom Mayne -- into a quick retelling of a fascinating tale. 1781: Pueblo of Los Angeles is established.
BOOKS
June 24, 2001 | KEVIN STARR, Kevin Starr is state librarian of California and a professor at USC. His most recent book, "Troubled Dreams: California in War and Peace, 1940-1950," will be published by Oxford University Press in the fall
The La Jolla Woman's Club, its austere yet grand arched cloisters encompassing a palm-guarded lawn, glows with the sunlight of San Diego. The Bishop's School at La Jolla rises in white-walled futurism on the shores of the sundown sea. Sometime in the 1920s, writer M.F.K. Fisher, then a student, ate her first oyster here.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Two years ago, when the Getty Trust helped organize and fund more than five dozen exhibits on 20th century art in Los Angeles, a massive enterprise it labeled "Pacific Standard Time," it wasn't difficult to guess which era the museum would focus on. It was clearly going to be the postwar period, and the 1950s, '60s and '70s in particular. There wasn't much of an art scene in L.A. in first half of the century, after all, and World War II itself, in a range of ways, helped fuel a transformative boom in both industrial and cultural production here.
REAL ESTATE
September 11, 1988
I have long relished Sam Hall Kaplan's sage and witty commentaries on the state of Southern California architecture--but never have I appreciated him more than for his July 31 column headed "Hooray, We Hope, for Hollywood." Heartfelt thanks, Sam, for not mis using hopefully! MARVIN H. LEAF Santa Monica
HOME & GARDEN
May 4, 2006
WHAT a pleasure to read about Robert Winter ["Set in Stone and Tile," April 27]. In 1962, I took his American culture course at UCLA's history department. It was a life-changing intellectual experience for an 18-year-old working-class kid who was first in her family to go to college. Over the years, I've bought several editions of his Southern California architecture guidebook, but I still have the original mimeographed sheets he handed out in that class. Thank you again, Professor Winter, for being such an inspiration.
TRAVEL
April 24, 2011 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The San Fernando Valley is 260 square miles of suburbia. Actually, make that suburbia on nutritional supplements. And antidepressants. With perhaps a little cosmetic surgery south of Ventura Boulevard, where the big money is. Or maybe - now that it's grown to more than 1.7 million people in nearly three dozen cities and neighborhoods rich and poor - the Valley isn't even a suburb anymore. It begins just 10 miles northwest of Los Angeles City Hall, sprawling west to the Simi Hills, north to the Santa Susana Mountains, and east to the Verdugo and San Gabriel mountains.
BOOKS
June 24, 2001 | KEVIN STARR, Kevin Starr is state librarian of California and a professor at USC. His most recent book, "Troubled Dreams: California in War and Peace, 1940-1950," will be published by Oxford University Press in the fall
The La Jolla Woman's Club, its austere yet grand arched cloisters encompassing a palm-guarded lawn, glows with the sunlight of San Diego. The Bishop's School at La Jolla rises in white-walled futurism on the shores of the sundown sea. Sometime in the 1920s, writer M.F.K. Fisher, then a student, ate her first oyster here.
MAGAZINE
August 30, 1992
Planner patois, courtesy of the "Plannerese Dictionary," published by the Inland Empire Section of the American Planning Assn. Architectural birth control: n. Limiting the number of children in a housing division by excluding dwellings with multiple bedrooms. Birds and bunnies: n. Environmentalists. "The birds and bunnies killed that development plan." California Nondescript: adj. Prevalent style of Southern California architecture. Grant gnats: n .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2001
10am Architecture Southern California architecture is a hot topic these days, especially when it involves projects ranging from trendy live/work studios to residential housing in historic areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1998
In the American tradition of diversity and religious freedom, I too celebrate the opening of the King Fahd Mosque on the Westside, which adds to Southern California's architecture and enriches the spiritual lives of the Muslim faithful in the region (July 18). However, I censure the Islamic religious leaders in attendance for being apologists for Saudi Arabia's rulers, who practice absolute religious discrimination and prohibit any expression of non-Islamic faiths in their land. All too often, immigrant religious leaders in the U.S. unabashedly preach the superiority of Islam, promote community and religious exclusion and reinforce the less glorious traditions of Islamic religious practice through captive ethnic and religious forums, while self-servingly embracing the protections and guarantees of the Constitution.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|