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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
Growing numbers of women in Los Angeles are not receiving adequate medical care during pregnancy, according to a report issued Monday by a nonprofit group that monitors infant mortality and the availability of prenatal care to women statewide. The group, the Southern California Child Health Network, criticized Gov. George Deukmejian for cutting from next year's budget more than $20 million in prenatal care programs for pregnant women.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1988 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
Growing numbers of women in Los Angeles are not receiving adequate medical care during pregnancy, according to a report issued Monday by a nonprofit group that monitors infant mortality and the availability of prenatal care to women statewide. The group, the Southern California Child Health Network, criticized Gov. George Deukmejian for cutting from next year's budget more than $20 million in prenatal care programs for pregnant women.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1987
A million thanks on behalf of the Southern California Child Health Network for running that super editorial (June 25) in support of state Sen. Marian Bergeson's bill on prenatal care (SB 1071). We are indeed getting danger signals in health in California, and it seems to me that this is a case where the right thing to do is also the frugal thing to do in the long run. SUZANNE TOLL PELTASON Irvine
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1988
I applaud the work of the Southern California Child Health Network and the editorial "The Dying Babies" (March 29). It is indeed a tragedy that thousands of California's babies die in the face of indisputable evidence which shows that ensuring access to prenatal care services is more humane and cost effective than treating premature, low birth weight infants with intensive medical services. Moreover, such access to prenatal care must not be dependent on partisan politics in Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1987 | Times staff writer Maria L. La Ganga compiled the Week in Review stories
Orange County's record on infant mortality may be improving, but local medical institutions still lag far behind those in other California counties in offering adequate prenatal care, according to an independent statewide study of infant health. The county's overburdened prenatal clinics turned away 2,000 indigent patients in 1985.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1987 | MARCIDA DODSON, Times Staff Writer
Despite its improving record on infant mortality, Orange County lags far behind other California counties in offering adequate prenatal care, according to an independent statewide study of infant health around the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1988
Gov. George Deukmejian has just signed important legislation that should help give thousands of infants a healthier start in life. The new law says that pregnant women whose families earn too little to afford proper medical care but too much to qualify for state aid now can receive that help. It is a compassionate move. The governor has also been applauded by public hospital officials for signing bills that mend other holes in the state's health-care system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1987
Thanks to the Times for featuring Claire Spiegel's and Robert Steinbrook's in-depth reports on prenatal care in Los Angeles County (Part I, Nov. 8 and 9) and for your incisive editorial commentary ("Next Generation at Risk," Nov. 10). The editorial provides a pragmatic, sensible framework for action at the state level and in Los Angeles County. L.A. County's leaders are to be commended for taking several significant steps to begin to deal with the prenatal care problem. The county supervisors' allocation of $1 million in additional funds for prenatal care, along with the patient fees it will generate, should make it possible to increase prenatal visits by 25% in the next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1987 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
California, which once ranked seventh best in the nation in preventing infant mortality, has fallen to 14th place largely because of the rising number of women who receive late or no prenatal care, according to a private study released Monday. An estimated 40,000 California babies this year will die at birth or soon thereafter, or will begin their lives at risk for serious medical problems that are largely preventable through adequate prenatal care, according to the report.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
A new state health insurance program for prenatal and pediatric care--called "Baby-Cal"--was proposed Tuesday as a way of promoting the health of all pregnant women in California and their young children. The program, outlined in Sacramento by a private health care coalition, would provide insurance for about 60,000 pregnant women and 500,000 children under age 5 who currently have no coverage. These women and children make up a critical portion of the 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1987
In California 32,000 pregnant women a year go without the most basic prenatal care. Most of them are too poor to get care or too frustrated by long waits at public hospitals. Too often their babies are born weighing too little to thrive, and they often die. Those who survive often require long stays in expensive intensive-care units. The question is not only one of humanity, it is one of money. For every $1 spent on prenatal care, it's possible to save $3.
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