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NEWS
March 16, 1994 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's that sound? It's the phone not ringing. In a city with three area codes, a city where people can be spotted walking down neighborhood streets squiring a dog on a leash in one hand and carrying a cellular telephone in the other, the silence was almost operatic in scope. The morning for many Angelenos got short-circuited when fire knocked out service at a Downtown Pacific Bell switching facility for several hours Tuesday morning.
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BUSINESS
September 30, 1999 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This weekend, AirTouch Cellular will put the final touches on a massive, four-month network overhaul that includes replacing equipment at more than 1,000 cell sites throughout the Los Angeles region. But the project, touted by equipment vendor Nortel Networks as "the most complex network upgrade ever attempted in the United States," has left many AirTouch customers unimpressed.
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BUSINESS
September 30, 1999 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This weekend, AirTouch Cellular will put the final touches on a massive, four-month network overhaul that includes replacing equipment at more than 1,000 cell sites throughout the Los Angeles region. But the project, touted by equipment vendor Nortel Networks as "the most complex network upgrade ever attempted in the United States," has left many AirTouch customers unimpressed.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's that sound? It's the phone not ringing. In a city with three area codes, a city where people can be spotted walking down neighborhood streets squiring a dog on a leash in one hand and carrying a cellular telephone in the other, the silence was almost operatic in scope. The morning for many Angelenos got short-circuited when fire knocked out service at a Downtown Pacific Bell switching facility for several hours Tuesday morning.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | MILES CORWIN and JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A fire at a Downtown Los Angeles Pacific Bell switching facility crippled the city's phone service early Tuesday, blocking millions of calls, knocking out many appeals for emergency service, disrupting businesses and shutting down automated teller machines throughout the city.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | MILES CORWIN and JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A fire at a Downtown Los Angeles Pacific Bell switching facility crippled the city's phone service early Tuesday, blocking millions of calls, knocking out many appeals for emergency service, disrupting businesses and shutting down automated teller machines throughout the city.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | This story was reported and written by Times staff writers Alan Citron, David Ferrell, Victor Merina, Dean Murphy, William C. Rempel, Ronald L. Soble and Robert Steinbrook. Also contributing were staff writers Julie Cart, John Chandler, Daryl Kelley, Joanna Miller, Steve Padilla and Sebastian Rotella and researchers Doug Conner and Janet Lundblad
Helicopters, dozens of them, rising like a flock of frightened birds from a quivering landscape, would be the first signs of response if a major rush-hour earthquake struck Southern California. Whining over paralyzed freeways, sharing the sky with plumes of smoke from flash fires on the ground, the darting aircraft would scatter to pick up officials responsible for protecting public safety and managing the region's recovery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1998 | COLL METCALFE
Sprint PCS has announced a major expansion into the lucrative Southern California communications market that will give Ventura County residents a third choice in wireless service providers. With an ambitious plan to plug into Ventura, San Bernardino and Riverside counties, Sprint PCS has shifted its strategy of building customer bases in the most populated areas to one of regional coverage with greater focus on service quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001
The real tragedy is not the lack of National Public Radio programming in L.A., it is the lack of public television programming in the center of the entertainment industry ("Poised to Spread an L.A. State of Mind," by Sean Mitchell, June 4). With one of the largest audiences in the country, tremendous facilities, huge fund-raising efforts and the proximity of the entertainment business, KCET produces no national programs, one regional California program and a local news broadcast. This is disgraceful.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2003
RE "A Film Is Condemned, Sight Unseen, Yet Again," by Patrick Goldstein, Aug. 12): Hello? It's called hype, Mr. Goldstein -- creating a buzz -- and you fell for it like the sucker born every minute. It's amazing that Mel Gibson has everyone talking about an unfinished film with a hackneyed plot, no sex and most likely grisly violence. I agree. Let's have no more unpaid advertising about this film until it opens and then let the audience decide. Jessica Davis Sherman Oaks IN an ideal world, viewing a film is the most accurate way to judge it. However, when trying to correct Hollywood's negative portrayal of minorities, sometimes one does not have the luxury to wait for the release of a movie to be able to prevent stereotyping.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | MILES CORWIN and JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A fire at a Downtown Los Angeles Pacific Bell switching facility crippled the city's phone service early Tuesday, blocking millions of calls, knocking out many appeals for emergency service, disrupting businesses and shutting down automated teller machines throughout the city.
NEWS
March 16, 1994 | MILES CORWIN and JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A fire at a Downtown Los Angeles Pacific Bell switching facility crippled the city's phone service early Tuesday, blocking millions of calls, knocking out many appeals for emergency service, disrupting businesses and shutting down automated teller machines throughout the city.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | This story was reported and written by Times staff writers Alan Citron, David Ferrell, Victor Merina, Dean Murphy, William C. Rempel, Ronald L. Soble and Robert Steinbrook. Also contributing were staff writers Julie Cart, John Chandler, Daryl Kelley, Joanna Miller, Steve Padilla and Sebastian Rotella and researchers Doug Conner and Janet Lundblad
Helicopters, dozens of them, rising like a flock of frightened birds from a quivering landscape, would be the first signs of response if a major rush-hour earthquake struck Southern California. Whining over paralyzed freeways, sharing the sky with plumes of smoke from flash fires on the ground, the darting aircraft would scatter to pick up officials responsible for protecting public safety and managing the region's recovery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2009 | By Maeve Reston
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday unanimously urged the California High Speed Rail Authority to consider two proposed alternatives for the bullet train stop at Union Station downtown. Councilman Ed Reyes said the alternatives were crucial to protecting residents in East L.A. as planners determine the route for the 800-mile bullet train between Northern California and San Diego. Proponents say the train would carry passengers from L.A. to San Francisco in about 2 1/2 hours.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1998 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS
Santa Clara, Calif.-based Covad Communications Co. today joins a growing list of companies offering faster connections to Southern California Internet users with a need for speed. The company, which launched high-speed Internet access in the Bay Area in December, is flush with money and has embarked on an aggressive expansion into Los Angeles and other regions.
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