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Southern California Council For Soviet Jews

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August 30, 1990 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Head down, Si Frumkin stood quietly as he was introduced to the group of about 35 affluent mainstream Jews. Although he was, for decades, one of the most relentless and troublesome voices speaking out on behalf of Soviet Jews, few in the room had heard of him. Frumkin mock-winced in embarrassment as the introduction was ended: "Since he retired in 1987, he has been devoting his full life to doing good deeds."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2009 | Jon Thurber
In the late 1960s, as reports of repression of Soviet Jews began to increase, a question began filtering to the West: "Why have you forgotten us?" Si Frumkin, a survivor of Dachau and a prominent Los Angeles textile manufacturer, heard the question and it reminded him of the days before the Holocaust. A man of direct action, Frumkin founded the Southern California Council for Soviet Jews in 1968 and over the next two decades would not leave the issue alone.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2009 | Jon Thurber
In the late 1960s, as reports of repression of Soviet Jews began to increase, a question began filtering to the West: "Why have you forgotten us?" Si Frumkin, a survivor of Dachau and a prominent Los Angeles textile manufacturer, heard the question and it reminded him of the days before the Holocaust. A man of direct action, Frumkin founded the Southern California Council for Soviet Jews in 1968 and over the next two decades would not leave the issue alone.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Head down, Si Frumkin stood quietly as he was introduced to the group of about 35 affluent mainstream Jews. Although he was, for decades, one of the most relentless and troublesome voices speaking out on behalf of Soviet Jews, few in the room had heard of him. Frumkin mock-winced in embarrassment as the introduction was ended: "Since he retired in 1987, he has been devoting his full life to doing good deeds."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1986
The Southern California Council for Soviet Jews would do well to find itself another spokesperson other than Si Frumkin. He adds insult to injury, first in castigating the press for deploring the release of tear gas at a performance of the Soviet Moiseyev dancers and then in suggesting that South African blacks somehow or other have it better than Soviet citizens. What an invidious comparison, and how it reeks of a racism quite equivalent to the anti-Semitism Frumkin apparently wants us to see in the press's coverage of an ugly incident.
NEWS
May 3, 1990
Los Angeles City Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky is in the Soviet Union this week to meet with government officials, Jewish leaders and representatives of the U.S. Embassy, his office said. Yaroslavsky will be in Moscow until Sunday at the invitation of Dr. Mikhail Chlenov, president of Vaad, an association of 210 Jewish organizations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1997
So Rep. Brad Sherman says, "I am the easiest guy to tap on the shoulder . . . " ("A Running Start," Nov. 24). Well, it wasn't always so. Several months ago, a delegation of representatives of the Russian-speaking community in Southern California traveled to Washington to talk to our representatives about pending immigration and welfare changes. We visited dozens of lawmakers, Californians and out-of-staters. The only representative who refused to talk to us or make an appointment during the two days we were there was, you guessed it, Brad Sherman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1990
The Soviet decree on restoration of citizenship to those who left to live abroad and were stripped of their citizenship might have a major practical consequence, in addition to its obvious humanitarian implications (Part A, Aug. 16). All Soviet Jews who left the country during the last several decades were required to relinquish their citizenship and pay the sum of 500 rubles (about $650 at the official exchange rate) per person. This applied to Jews only--Armenians and others were allowed to leave without losing their citizenship.
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 2,000 Jews--many of them immigrants from the Soviet Union--rallied outside the Federal Building in Westwood on Sunday and called on the U.S. and Soviet governments to expedite the emigration of thousands of Soviet Jews from their homeland. Clustering at the base of the building, Jewish community leaders said nearly 250,000 Jews are seeking to leave the Soviet Union in the wake of rising anti-Semitism.
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven Russian nationalist writers accused of holding anti-Semitic views sparred Tuesday with a group of American critics as the Bush Administration defended the use of about $60,000 in U.S. funds to help pay for the Soviets' visits. The most heated moment during a three-hour seminar featuring the writers occurred when a member of the audience waved an offending article from the Soviet press at its author, delegation leader Stanislav Kunyayev, editor of Nash Sovremennik (Our Contemporaries).
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