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NEWS
August 16, 1989 | ANNE BOGART
In Paris, women clutch flirtatious little Chanel bags, so small they hold next to nothing. In New York, they take the opposite tack, lugging mega-tote bags that bend their backs into Quasimodo crouches, so they can keep their subway reading, gym clothes and other such sundries close at hand. But in Los Angeles, women breeze around town carrying nothing except a set of keys. That's because the quintessential California purse comes with four wheels and a trunk.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Hobie Alter, who shaped Southern California's signature surf culture by pioneering the mass-produced foam surfboard and later popularized sailing by inventing a lightweight, high-performance catamaran, died Saturday at his home in Palm Desert. He was 80. The announcement of Alter's death was posted on www.hobie.com , his company's website. No cause was disclosed. Full obituary: Hobie Alter dies at 80 A self-taught design innovator and entrepreneur whose “Hobie” brand earned him a fortune, Alter was nonetheless a reluctant businessman who eschewed suits for cutoffs and was guided by his imagination above all else.
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NEWS
November 29, 1990 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a smile that slid into an easy laugh, Jackie Haddad Hellingson recalled that free-frolicking beach summer of '65 when her gang of bronze-skinned teen-agers waged war against The Outsiders. Yeah, those were the crazy times when every day seemed to last a year and the surf-wompers, sun-lovers and rock 'n' roll kids staked out the Windansea Beach in La Jolla like it was their own back yard--because it was. Back then, The Enemy drove huge gas-guzzlers with out-of-state plates.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2013 | By Marcia Adair
The first day of school, one of America's great communal experiences. Pencils are sharpened, backpacks bought and outfits laid out, found to be totally lame, OMG, and laid out again. But what today's kids in Los Angeles public schools will experience on Days 2 through 180 is significantly different from what their parents enjoyed when it comes to music, art, drama and field trips. For a variety of reasons, funds available to school boards for education in California have been devastated over the last 20 years, to levels some in the industry call the worst in U.S. history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In utter darkness, paramedics hiked into Whiting Ranch Wilderness Park last month to rescue an injured mountain biker. As they hauled out the biker on a stretcher, bobbing lights flashed around a bend in the trail and several bikes whizzed by, narrowly missing the emergency crew. It was the county park system's introduction to a new and fast-growing sport: night mountain biking.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Only three years ago, Southern California was coming of age. "With the opening of two major exhibition spaces for contemporary art, the city is on the verge of attaining world-class status," the New York Times Magazine declared of Los Angeles in 1986. Before long the media narrative had expanded: With planning, the Southern California metropolitan area "might even emerge as the Western Hemisphere's leading city in the early 21st Century," the Atlantic Monthly reported in 1988.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1995
A rotating panel of experts from the worlds of philosophy, psychology and religion offer their perspective on the dilemmas that come with living in Southern Calidfornia. Today's question: On a crowded freeway, what do we say about ourselves and public civility when we speed up to block another driver from moving into our lane? What ethical or moral rules can help change our behavior? Father Thomas P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1994 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a week when many Orange County restaurants and bars are offering margarita specials and mariachi music to celebrate Cinco de Mayo, local Latino leaders and Chicano studies classes are trying to stress the cultural and historical importance of the Mexican holiday most familiar to Americans. "I think the larger population sees it as a festive day like St. Patrick's Day and an occasion to go to happy hour," said UC Irvine Prof. Maria Herrera-Sobeck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1994 | D. JEAN QUASHIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Whether one loves or hates automobiles, the history of Los Angeles and the rest of Southern California is inextricably linked to our wheels. Automobiles have defined where and how Angelenos have lived, said Catherine Krell, deputy director of the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum. Suburbs and billboards were created because of autos. The world's first drive-through grocery store and drive-in church originated in Southern California. So why not celebrate our passion for pistons?
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | DUKE HELFAND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One by one, they park their shiny chrome motorcycles at the curb, joining a carnival of roaring engines and glaring headlights. They tell stories of the open road and mingle with veteran bikers and even the handful of Hells Angels who usually turn up. They look almost menacing, revving their monster Harley-Davidsons. Could there be danger in those studded leather jackets and scuffed cowboy boots? Not to worry. They're Rich Urban Bikers, or RUBs, a new and gentler breed of Harley riders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2010 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Introducing CulverLand ? for a limited time only. This newest attraction won't be confused with Disneyland, but it accomplishes the unlikely: creating a reason to celebrate Southern California traffic. Both artwork and game, CulverLand occupies an 18-by-90-foot stretch of unfinished sidewalk in front of the Culver Hotel in Culver City. Colored squares mark a rectangular path, with rules that riff on SoCal car culture and Candy Land, a child's game in which players advance by drawing cards of different colors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | SABRINA DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the glass door of Starbucks on Kanan Road a sign reads, "I'm sorry, we're out of soy milk until later today." Next door, on the glass window of Yum Yum Donuts, another sign reads, "Medium coffee and muffin $1.49 plus tax." A thin strip of grass--and one invisible barrier--separates the two establishments. Walk into Starbucks and you meet a line of upper-middle-class professionals waiting for coffee and pastries. A plum-painted ceiling is complemented by the designer tile and carpeting.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I know a thing or two about what's going on around Southern California. In fact, I generally know what's going on, when and where--whether I want to or not. I know Arcadia from Alhambra from Altadena. I know LACMA is closed on Wednesday; that on Thursdays and Fridays, the Getty requires reservations only until 4 p.m.; and that Fridays are better than Saturdays for public rush tickets. This isn't a boast. This is a job hazard of working in Calendar Weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2000 | DON SANDERS and SUSAN SANDERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Drive-in movie theaters have a long and rich history in Southern California--not surprising given the mild climate and Hollywood in its backyard. In fact, during the height of the drive-in movie theater boom between the mid-'50s and mid-'60s, there were more than 50 locations here, from Oxnard to Huntington Beach, Los Angeles to Loma Linda. The world's first drive-in theater (Richard Hollingshead came up with the concept) opened in Camden, N.J., on June 6, 1933.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1999 | TERRY McDERMOTT
Here's the problem: After the augmentation surgery, after the liposuction, the body sculpting, the laser hair removal and the tummy tuck, then what? Gravity, that's what. Gravity and cheesecake and mashed potatoes and various other forces of nature reassert themselves. And in the end you may be left with substantially what you started with, which must have been deficient or you'd never have gone for the assorted additions, subtractions and alterations in the first place. It's a sad old story.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Can Los Angeles and, by extension, Southern California become the capital of the 21st century if all the major corporate headquarters leave town? That's a question many people are asking as Atlantic Richfield Co. is about to be acquired by London-based BP Amoco, seemingly reinforcing this region's image as a branch office economy. "We're becoming the suburban capital of the world," says Linda Griego, local entrepreneur and former leader of Rebuild L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | SABRINA DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the glass door of Starbucks on Kanan Road a sign reads, "I'm sorry, we're out of soy milk until later today." Next door, on the glass window of Yum Yum Donuts, another sign reads, "Medium coffee and muffin $1.49 plus tax." A thin strip of grass--and one invisible barrier--separates the two establishments. Walk into Starbucks and you meet a line of upper-middle-class professionals waiting for coffee and pastries. A plum-painted ceiling is complemented by the designer tile and carpeting.
NEWS
October 1, 1989 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Urban Affairs Writer
The bets are down and the cars are braced for the race. A 1967 El Camino and a 1955 Chevrolet rock and roar, enveloped in a hellish fog of exhaust and smoke from the furious rotation of big slick tires burned sticky for better traction. Out of the darkness appears an elfin girl with flashing blond hair waving a red bandanna. Two drivers named Danny and "Seaweed" are off, reaching speeds of more than 100 m.p.h. on a well-traveled street in the middle of the nation's second-largest city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1998
In the land where everybody drives, everybody needs a tow. And that means you need a tow-truck driver, a Southern California fixture as ubiquitous as traffic and palm trees. Though there are tow-truck drivers around the world, nowhere does the job security compare with this largest car- and truck-purchasing state in the union, where 26 million vehicles were registered last year.
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