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BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
Construction is underway on a $74.3-million apartment complex across the street from the Cerritos Towne Center shopping and entertainment mall. The 198-unit apartment community called Aria is being built by Picerne Group, a real estate investment firm in San Juan Capistrano. Aria is the first new multifamily project larger than 100 units built in Cerritos in more than 40 years, said Brad Perozzi, managing director of Southern California development for Picerne Group. “This great infill site is close to thousands of jobs and within walking distance to really great retail, dining and employment opportunities,” Perozzi said.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
Construction is underway on a $74.3-million apartment complex across the street from the Cerritos Towne Center shopping and entertainment mall. The 198-unit apartment community called Aria is being built by Picerne Group, a real estate investment firm in San Juan Capistrano. Aria is the first new multifamily project larger than 100 units built in Cerritos in more than 40 years, said Brad Perozzi, managing director of Southern California development for Picerne Group. “This great infill site is close to thousands of jobs and within walking distance to really great retail, dining and employment opportunities,” Perozzi said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visions of a new Garden of Eden lured thousands of Americans to Southern California in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Aptly enough, the buildings in their new home were fanciful blends of the Spanish missions and imported styles from exotic places, laced with idealized notions of life in a balmy utopia with a mythical past and a gloriously health-conscious future.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2011 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
In a nod to the growing popularity of sun-powered houses, Los Angeles-based KB Home said it was rolling out 10 new Southern California developments that would have solar panels incorporated as a standard feature for each property. The homes will be outfitted with six-panel photovoltaic solar systems built by SunPower Corp. The standard system will be capable of producing about 30% of daily energy use for an 1,800- to 2,000-square-foot home, said Steve Ruffner, president of KB Home's Southern California division.
MAGAZINE
September 18, 1988 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Sam Hall Kaplan is The Times' urban design critic.
THE SUSTAINING DREAM of most Southern Californians is to not live in, or even near, a city. Just as when millions of young families flocked to the small farming towns on the fringes of a burgeon ing Los Angeles after World War II, today people are seeking economically and socially homogeneous suburban neighborhoods.
SPORTS
February 2, 2001 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You remember Steve Sampson, the scourge of U.S. soccer. He was the coach who resigned amid a firestorm of criticism after guiding the U.S. men to their one-goal, last-place performance at the 1998 World Cup in France. How quickly he was forgotten. And how quickly he has rebounded. He no longer coaches in a spotlight. But, in his role as a director of elite youth soccer programs, he might have even more influence than he did.
NEWS
October 12, 1995 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the big diesel-belching trucks that lumbered out of Orange County in the 1950s and '60s were loaded with juicy oranges for Midwestern tables and fancy asparagus for New York nightspots. Nowadays, nursery plants have overtaken foodstuffs as the county's principal agricultural crop. And more and more of those big trucks are headed for Las Vegas, carting palms, pines and podocarpus for a fast-growing community that prefers to look more Southern California coastal than high desert.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2006 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
THE pastime of bashing Los Angeles has gained a new urgency lately -- or at least a new piquancy. According to those who love to hate L.A., we're no longer responsible simply for our own ills. We're doing a pretty good job of ruining the developing world too. As Andrew Leonard (who lives in Berkeley, my hometown) wrote in Salon after taking his kids on a recent road trip to Southern California, "If the rest of the world continues to follow Los Angeles' example, we're all doomed."
BUSINESS
October 27, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of Thomas Brechtel's former colleagues and ex-friends could not believe what they were seeing on "60 Minutes" one recent Sunday evening. The former Broadway salesclerk and would-be developer was telling CBS correspondent Ed Bradley how he and his brother-in-law were supposedly duped out of tens of thousands of dollars by Dennis Levine, the Wall Street inside trader who was promoting a book about his rehabilitation after prison.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2011 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
In a nod to the growing popularity of sun-powered houses, Los Angeles-based KB Home said it was rolling out 10 new Southern California developments that would have solar panels incorporated as a standard feature for each property. The homes will be outfitted with six-panel photovoltaic solar systems built by SunPower Corp. The standard system will be capable of producing about 30% of daily energy use for an 1,800- to 2,000-square-foot home, said Steve Ruffner, president of KB Home's Southern California division.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2006 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
THE pastime of bashing Los Angeles has gained a new urgency lately -- or at least a new piquancy. According to those who love to hate L.A., we're no longer responsible simply for our own ills. We're doing a pretty good job of ruining the developing world too. As Andrew Leonard (who lives in Berkeley, my hometown) wrote in Salon after taking his kids on a recent road trip to Southern California, "If the rest of the world continues to follow Los Angeles' example, we're all doomed."
SPORTS
February 2, 2001 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You remember Steve Sampson, the scourge of U.S. soccer. He was the coach who resigned amid a firestorm of criticism after guiding the U.S. men to their one-goal, last-place performance at the 1998 World Cup in France. How quickly he was forgotten. And how quickly he has rebounded. He no longer coaches in a spotlight. But, in his role as a director of elite youth soccer programs, he might have even more influence than he did.
NEWS
October 12, 1995 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of the big diesel-belching trucks that lumbered out of Orange County in the 1950s and '60s were loaded with juicy oranges for Midwestern tables and fancy asparagus for New York nightspots. Nowadays, nursery plants have overtaken foodstuffs as the county's principal agricultural crop. And more and more of those big trucks are headed for Las Vegas, carting palms, pines and podocarpus for a fast-growing community that prefers to look more Southern California coastal than high desert.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One week there would be a gas station, the next week there would be a mini-mall. That seemed to be the story of the '80s on many Southern California street corners. So the irony wasn't lost on Hal Katersky when he saw that a familiar San Fernando Valley mini-mall had been demolished--soon to be replaced, of all things, by a gas station. "I got a big laugh out of it," said the real estate investor who once was part-owner of a dozen of the shopping strips. " . . . It has gone full circle."
BUSINESS
October 27, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of Thomas Brechtel's former colleagues and ex-friends could not believe what they were seeing on "60 Minutes" one recent Sunday evening. The former Broadway salesclerk and would-be developer was telling CBS correspondent Ed Bradley how he and his brother-in-law were supposedly duped out of tens of thousands of dollars by Dennis Levine, the Wall Street inside trader who was promoting a book about his rehabilitation after prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visions of a new Garden of Eden lured thousands of Americans to Southern California in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Aptly enough, the buildings in their new home were fanciful blends of the Spanish missions and imported styles from exotic places, laced with idealized notions of life in a balmy utopia with a mythical past and a gloriously health-conscious future.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One week there would be a gas station, the next week there would be a mini-mall. That seemed to be the story of the '80s on many Southern California street corners. So the irony wasn't lost on Hal Katersky when he saw that a familiar San Fernando Valley mini-mall had been demolished--soon to be replaced, of all things, by a gas station. "I got a big laugh out of it," said the real estate investor who once was part-owner of a dozen of the shopping strips. " . . . It has gone full circle."
MAGAZINE
September 18, 1988 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Sam Hall Kaplan is The Times' urban design critic.
THE SUSTAINING DREAM of most Southern Californians is to not live in, or even near, a city. Just as when millions of young families flocked to the small farming towns on the fringes of a burgeon ing Los Angeles after World War II, today people are seeking economically and socially homogeneous suburban neighborhoods.
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