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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1992
A Los Angeles City Council committee Monday approved a plan to enter into an agreement with the county and state to gather seismic information on local buildings and bridges. The Public Safety Committee allotted $750,000 for the project. The money comes from Seismic General Obligation Bond funds made available through Proposition G, which voters approved in 1990. The county and state will also kick in $750,000 for the project.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The Puente Hills fault, which scientists believe could be responsible for Friday's 5.1 earthquake in La Habra, is considered very dangerous. Here are some basic questions about the fault. Q: What would be the difference in shaking between a 5.1 quake and a truly huge quake? Friday night's earthquake was caused by the underground fault slipping for half a second, said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Lucy Jones, prompting about 10 seconds of shaking at the surface. But a 7.5 quake on the Puente Hills fault could cause the fault to slip for 20 seconds - and the shaking could last far longer.
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NEWS
April 8, 1999 | CONNIE KOENENN
April is Earthquake Preparedness Month--you know what that means. Time to check the spare batteries, recycle the supplies in the emergency kits you have stashed about, and review the drill: "When you first feel a tremor, head for the doorway!" Wrong. That myth is left over from a century ago, when adobe houses collapsed in an earthquake, leaving only a wooden frame, says Mark Benthien, outreach specialist with the Southern California Earthquake Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude-5.1 earthquake that rattled Southern California on Friday was a 10-second reminder of a fault that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. The Puente Hills thrust fault is so dangerous because of its location, running from the suburbs of northern Orange County, though the San Gabriel Valley and under the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles before ending in Hollywood. Experts say a major 7.5-magnitude earthquake on the fault could do more damage to the heart of Los Angeles than the dreaded Big One on the San Andreas fault, which is located on the outskirts of metropolitan Southern California.
NEWS
March 3, 1994 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientists examining movement along faults in Southern California said Wednesday that the region may be in for a series of earthquakes comparable to the Northridge temblor--or a single far greater quake--in upcoming decades. Lucile M. Jones, a geophysicist with the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2006 | Sharon Bernstein, Times Staff Writer
A study of how earthquake waves from the San Andreas fault travel through different types of Southern California soil marks what scientists say is a promising first step in an ambitious effort to pinpoint neighborhoods and even individual city blocks where the shaking would be most severe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
A study published Thursday by California researchers provides the clearest picture yet of the subtle, slow-motion warping of the earth's surface that can happen after an earthquake on a buried fault. The research focused on a magnitude 6.6 earthquake in Iran and details how seismic forces deform the ground. Scientists said it can help us better understand the myriad faults in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The Puente Hills fault, which scientists believe could be responsible for Friday's 5.1 earthquake in La Habra, is considered very dangerous. Here are some basic questions about the fault. Q: What would be the difference in shaking between a 5.1 quake and a truly huge quake? Friday night's earthquake was caused by the underground fault slipping for half a second, said U.S. Geological Survey seismologist Lucy Jones, prompting about 10 seconds of shaking at the surface. But a 7.5 quake on the Puente Hills fault could cause the fault to slip for 20 seconds - and the shaking could last far longer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 5.1 earthquake that rattled Southern California on Friday was a 10-second reminder of a fault that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. The Puente Hills thrust fault is so dangerous because of its location, running from the suburbs of northern Orange County, through the San Gabriel Valley and under the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles before ending in Hollywood. Experts say a major, magnitude 7.5 earthquake on the fault could do more damage to the heart of Los Angeles than the dreaded Big One on the San Andreas fault, which is on the outskirts of metropolitan Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A new earthquake center is being established in Los Angeles to focus and integrate research throughout Southern California as part of a program that should lead to the creation of precise maps that will define the seismic hazards for every neighborhood. The Southern California Earthquake Center, headquartered at USC, will bring at least $5 million in new federal research money to this region each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 5.1 earthquake that rattled Southern California on Friday was a 10-second reminder of a fault that seismologists believe can produce a catastrophic disaster. The Puente Hills thrust fault is so dangerous because of its location, running from the suburbs of northern Orange County, through the San Gabriel Valley and under the skyscrapers of downtown Los Angeles before ending in Hollywood. Experts say a major, magnitude 7.5 earthquake on the fault could do more damage to the heart of Los Angeles than the dreaded Big One on the San Andreas fault, which is on the outskirts of metropolitan Southern California.
SCIENCE
April 1, 2011 | Eryn Brown
Americans have been lulled into a false sense of security that they are prepared for a devastating earthquake, according to a report issued Wednesday by the National Research Council. Among other recommendations, the report's 20-year "road map" for preparedness -- which was in the works long before a magnitude 9 quake hit Japan on March 11 -- calls on the U.S. to beef up earthquake research and improve forecasts and warning systems. In California, scientists are five years into work on just the type of early-warning system the report endorses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2010 | By Tony Perry and Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times
More than two dozen earthquakes struck Monday night near the U.S-Mexico border in San Diego County, rocking a large swath of Southern California, prompting a momentary shutdown of the San Diego Padres game but causing no apparent major damage, officials said. The largest of the quakes — a 5.7 magnitude temblor — was recorded at 9:26 p.m, the U.S. Geological Survey said. It could be felt throughout Los Angeles County. That quake was centered five miles southeast of Ocotillo in San Diego County and 16 miles east-northeast of Jacumba in eastern San Diego County, the survey agency said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong
A study published Thursday by California researchers provides the clearest picture yet of the subtle, slow-motion warping of the earth's surface that can happen after an earthquake on a buried fault. The research focused on a magnitude 6.6 earthquake in Iran and details how seismic forces deform the ground. Scientists said it can help us better understand the myriad faults in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2008 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
Southern California stands a much greater chance of a huge temblor in the next 30 years than Northern California, according to a statewide earthquake forecast released Monday. The report, which brought together experts from the U.S. Geological Survey, USC's Southern California Earthquake Center and the State Geological Survey, also found that California is virtually certain to experience at least one major temblor by 2028. According to the research, the chance of a 6.
OPINION
January 9, 2007 | Thomas H. Jordan, THOMAS H. JORDAN is the director of the Southern California Earthquake Center and a professor of geophysics at USC.
ON THE MORNING of Jan. 9, 1857, a small patch of the San Andreas fault shifted near Parkfield, 40 miles northeast of the Franciscan mission at San Luis Obispo. If nothing else had happened, this event would have been typical of the magnitude 6-plus earthquakes that occur every 20 years or so and have made Parkfield the self-styled "earthquake capital of the world." However, a few hours later, the fault shifted again, just south of Parkfield, and this time it didn't stop short.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2010 | By Tony Perry and Robert J. Lopez, Los Angeles Times
More than two dozen earthquakes struck Monday night near the U.S-Mexico border in San Diego County, rocking a large swath of Southern California, prompting a momentary shutdown of the San Diego Padres game but causing no apparent major damage, officials said. The largest of the quakes — a 5.7 magnitude temblor — was recorded at 9:26 p.m, the U.S. Geological Survey said. It could be felt throughout Los Angeles County. That quake was centered five miles southeast of Ocotillo in San Diego County and 16 miles east-northeast of Jacumba in eastern San Diego County, the survey agency said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2001 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Exactly seven years after the Northridge earthquake and just days after two short, sharp temblors shook the region, geologists on Tuesday released the first report identifying Southern California's seismic "hot spots"--areas expected to shake the hardest during tremors. Compton, just south of downtown, sits in the center of one seismic hot spot, as does an area in the northern San Fernando Valley where the Foothill Freeway meets the Golden State Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2006 | Sharon Bernstein, Times Staff Writer
California has spent billions retrofitting freeway overpasses and public buildings to make them safer in earthquakes. But in the absence of a real quake to test their strength, it has been impossible to say for certain how the structures would hold up. Some older regulations thought to protect structures against earthquakes have been proved by real temblors to be inadequate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2006 | Sharon Bernstein, Times Staff Writer
A study of how earthquake waves from the San Andreas fault travel through different types of Southern California soil marks what scientists say is a promising first step in an ambitious effort to pinpoint neighborhoods and even individual city blocks where the shaking would be most severe.
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