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Southern California Economy

BUSINESS
August 27, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the nation's economy appears on its way to recovery, Southern California is expected to continue struggling this year and into 1992 as a result of more aerospace layoffs, a stagnating real estate market and business flight from the region. That forecast, issued Monday by the Economic Development Corp. of Los Angeles County, also projects sharp jumps in unemployment in Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, San Bernardino and Riverside counties in the next six months.
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BUSINESS
October 28, 1988 | GEORGE WHITE, Times Staff Writer
Southern California as the 51st state? Don't count on it anytime soon. Still, the booming economy of the 10-county region will overshadow that of every other state--including New York--within two decades, according to a new study. The report, prepared by San Francisco-based Wells Fargo Bank, makes that projection even though it assumes that the growth of the Southern California economy will slow somewhat between now and the year 2010.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1989 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The torrid pace of economic growth in Southern California is likely to cool in 1989 as defense spending shrinks and interest rates rise, economists predict. But the expected slowdown may do nothing more than bring the Southland's economic growth rate in line with that of the nation as a whole, they add. In recent years, Southern California's economy has grown significantly faster than the nation's.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
It's being called the most important development of the next two decades for Southern California's economy. It promises to create 700,000 jobs and to generate billions of dollars in business development. Yet most people, if they've heard of it at all, are vague on just what the Alameda Corridor is.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Prosperity has returned at last to Southern California's economy. Now if only wisdom were to follow, we could be assured the region will fulfill its great potential in the years ahead. But the ballot initiatives for Tuesday's statewide primary election are characterized by argument and division, not wisdom. And that promises to reinforce a worrisome trend of bitter differences that constantly threatens progress in Southern California's economy.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
It produces large portions of the nation's rivets, cooking oil, upholstery filling and guided missiles. New residents clamor in at the rate of 1,000 a day--opening bank accounts, filling their shopping carts, jamming the freeways, walking into classrooms, struggling for a better life in mom-and-pop businesses. If it were a country, its economy would rank 12th in the world (just behind Brazil but ahead of India).
NEWS
August 7, 1990 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hobbled by defense cutbacks, sharply reduced construction and other problems, Southern California's economy has become increasingly vulnerable to a recession, economists say. "If the nation heads toward a slump, we will feel it much more than in the past," said Goetz Wolff, a consultant to the Los Angeles Economic Roundtable, a business organization. And increasingly, a slump appears to be just where the nation is headed, some analysts say. U.S.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas Corp. announced Friday that it will close its Torrance aircraft parts manufacturing plant next year and eliminate 2,000 jobs, a serious blow to the Southern California aerospace industry and a grim omen for economic rebuilding efforts following the Los Angeles riots.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1992 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking issue with doom and gloom projections about Southern California's economy, several economists and business leaders said Monday that prospects for job and business growth remain bright once the recession ends. Among the engines that will drive the local economy are increasing international trade, particularly with Mexico and Asia; the burgeoning of small businesses, especially in high-tech fields, and the continuing influx of immigrants from the rest of the nation and the world.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1993 | DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New home construction in California and the rest of the Western United States surged nearly 18% in March from February, the government said Tuesday, but a huge drop in the weather-battered East pulled down construction activity nationwide by 4.6%. New homes began at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 296,000 units in the West last month, up from February's 251,000-unit rate and well ahead of January's rain-soaked 219,000-unit pace, according to the Commerce Department.
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