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BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Southern California Edison issued layoff notices to 600 employees this week, following news this month that the San Onofre nuclear plant in San Clemente would be permanently retired. The coastal plant that once supplied power to 1.4 million homes in Southern California was closed in January 2012 when a tube in its newly replaced steam generators leaked a small amount of radioactive steam, leading to the discovery that the tubes were wearing down at an unusual rate. The shutdown will mean the utility company will reduce its staff at the plant from about 1,500 to 400. Quiz: How much do you know about California's economy?
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BUSINESS
April 17, 2014 | By Shan Li
Problems at some of the state's fuel refineries have sent gasoline prices soaring in California just in time for the kickoff of the busy driving season. A gallon of regular gasoline hit a statewide average of $4.196 on Thursday, up about 13 cents in a week, according to AAA. That's the highest price since March 2013. If gas prices keep surging, David Buzzo plans to cut down on dinners out and impulse purchases. Buzzo, a supervisor of field services for Southern California Edison, said he's always conscious of every uptick in price when filling up. "That takes away other money, luxury money," the 59-year-old Hollywood resident said.
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BUSINESS
November 29, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Almost 5 million Southern California Edison Co. customers in hundreds of cities and communities across the southern, central and coastal parts of the state will be hit with higher electric bills early next year and bigger hikes in each of the following two years. The decision, which Edison says will add an average of $7 a month to residential bills for the first year, covers Edison's costs to provide service, which amounts to about half a ratepayer's bill. Other costs for buying fuel and contracting for power deliveries fluctuate and are passed directly to consumers.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
 Southern California Edison Co. plans to lay off hundreds of employees as part of a management streamlining and outsourcing of some functions such as information technology. The number of workers affected by the cuts will be "in the high hundreds," said Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima), chairman of the Senate Energy, Utilities and Communications Committee. "It's pretty disappointing.... [The cuts] are not going to help" the California economy. Padilla was briefed by his committee consultants, who said they were told that the utility expected to cut 500 in-house employees and another 400 to 500 contract workers beginning this summer.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Southern California Edison, the state's No. 2 utility, will default on principal payments on $200 million of six-year notes coming due Friday, company executives said. The unit of Rosemead-based Edison International is struggling under more than $5.4 billion of losses incurred paying soaring power costs it couldn't pass on to customers. Edison has defaulted on more than $490 million of commercial paper this year and on $200 million of five-year notes that came due on Jan. 16.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2003 | Nancy Rivera Brooks
Electricity rate relief is on the horizon for customers of Southern California Edison. The Rosemead-based utility will file for a rate decrease this week with the California Public Utilities Commission to take effect after Edison has paid power debts left over from the energy crisis, which is expected about midyear, an Edison spokesman said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1992 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest commitment of private funds to rebuild Los Angeles since the city suffered devastating riots two weeks ago, Southern California Edison today will announce a $35-million job training and economic development plan to help the affected communities. "This is by far the largest commitment we have ever made to an effort of this kind," said Edison Chairman John E. Bryson, noting that the expenditure will be more than double the company's total philanthropic budget this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2003
A fire at a Southern California Edison substation in Acton burned several hours Friday, fueled by thousands of gallons of mineral oil used to insulate transformers. An internal mechanical failure sparked the blaze about 6:30 p.m. at the manned substation, said Edison spokesman Steve Conroy. Flames were visible 10 miles away in Palmdale. County Fire Capt. Mark Savage said about 75 firefighters used foam to quell the blaze near Angeles Forest Highway and Hillside Drive. No injuries were reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
T.M. McDaniel Jr., 91, former president of Southern California Edison, died July 10 at a retirement home in Aliso Viejo, the utility announced. McDaniel was president of Southern California Edison from 1968 to 1978 and retired at age 62. He began his career with the utility in 1956 as the executive in charge of organization and procedures. He served as vice president for sales and commercial programs, executive vice president and a director before he was named president.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most new attractions at theme parks are measured in the millions of dollars these days, the Thomas A. Edison Inventors Workshop unveiled Thursday at Knott's Berry Farm is a bit of an oddity. Built for $20,000--the cost of materials--by Southern California Edison volunteers and retirees, it is in a shack at Camp Snoopy that used to house a computer lab. It's a joint project between Knott's and the utility, which hoped to create an attraction that would spark student interest in science.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Ratepayers of Southern California Edison Co. and San Diego Gas & Electric Co. could be in line for a share of more than $1 billion in refunds as part of a possible financial settlement from the closure of the San Onofre nuclear power plant. Both Edison and another party to the negotiations, the Utility Reform Network (TURN), a consumer advocacy group, confirmed that a settlement conference is scheduled Thursday at the San Francisco headquarters of the California Public Utilities Commission.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Three years ago--2:49 p.m. March 11, 2011, Tokyo time, or late on the night of March 10 in continental U.S. time zones--what may be history's worst, most enduring nuclear power plant disaster began in Japan. It's a baleful anniversary that bears object lessons for the entire nuclear power industry in the U.S. and around the world.  The Fukushima Daiichi power complex, largely destroyed by the earthquake that struck Japan at that hour and the two tsunami waves that followed starting about 40 minutes later, is almost certain never to operate again.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California farmers markets want to get tough with interlopers who don't sell what they grow. They're backing a bill to crack down on vendors who falsely claim to offer pesticide-free or locally grown fruits, nuts and vegetables. "Californians are fortunate to have the highest concentration of farmers markets in the nation," said the bill's author, Assemblyman Roger Dickinson (D-Sacramento). The bill, AB 1871, he said, would "increase consumer protections and accountability at our certified farmers markets, protect local farmers and help this growing sector of the economy continue to thrive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Ruben Vives
Some Azusa residents forced out of their homes by the Colby fire will be allowed to return Friday afternoon, though officials said one community would remain closed off. Azusa police and L.A. County sheriff's officials said residents living north of Sierra Madre Avenue between Yucca Ridge and Ranch Road -- including the Crystal Canyon condo complex and the Mirador housing tract -- would be allowed to return to their homes at 4 p.m. But mandatory...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
As few as two customers remain without power in El Segundo after a suspected drunk driver crashed into two power poles early Wednesday and knocked out electricity for a large swath of the city. The driver, who was not immediately identified, crashed near the intersection of El Segundo Boulevard and Sheldon Street at 2:39 a.m., according to the El Segundo Police Department. The outage affected customers from El Segundo Boulevard to Imperial Avenue, police said. The driver was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
About 600 customers remain without power Wednesday night after a suspected drunk driver crashed his car into two power poles in El Segundo earlier in the day, authorities said. The single-car accident occurred about 2:40 a.m. near El Segundo Boulevard and Sheldon Street, according to the El Segundo Police Department. The vehicle knocked down two power poles, resulting in a large electrical outage, police said. The driver was arrested on suspicion of driving drunk. Paul Netter, a spokesman for Southern California Edison, said the outage initially affected more than 4,000 customers.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1992 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ade Eitner got quite a shock from his small manufacturing company's June electric bill, which took a 55% jump from the previous month and has stayed in the same lofty neighborhood. Village Covenant Church in Azusa saw a doubling of its electric bills. "Our bills have never, ever been this high," said Gene Palmer, a member of Village Covenant's church council. "It's very difficult."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1990 | JACK SEARLES
Despite objections from environmentalists, the Board of Supervisors Tuesday approved an agreement that virtually removes the county's opposition to the proposed merger of Southern California Edison and San Diego's chief power utility. Three weeks ago, the supervisors had threatened to battle the merger between Edison and San Diego Gas & Electric unless serious flaws in a state study of the deal were corrected. In a letter to the state Public Utilities Commission, board Chairwoman Madge L.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
After coping with the June shutdown of the San Onofre nuclear power plant near San Clemente, the fallout from a fatal 2010 explosion of a natural gas pipeline in the Bay Area and a batch of consumer protection issues, the state's Public Utilities Commission faces more challenges in the year ahead. And on the spot will be PUC President Michael R. Peevey, 75, who has served as California's chief utility regulator under three governors. He will have been the longest-serving head of the agency by the time his term expires at the end of next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
[Updated 12:18 p.m.: Southern California Edison spokesman Robert Villegas says that 362 customers remain without power and the expected restoration time is around 11 p.m. Villegas said there was a wire down and that “we're still suspecting that it was wind.” ] A major power outage in Simi Valley Wednesday morning has left thousands of residents without electricity and affected traffic signals at intersections in the area. The outage occurred at 9:10 a.m. and mainly affected two circuits, said Southern California Edison spokesman Robert Villegas.
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