Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouthern California Education
IN THE NEWS

Southern California Education

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julia Barnheiser, an emissary from Santa Ana's Madison Elementary School, knew this case would be tough: The boy was about to be expelled from first grade. He could not behave. He often missed school altogether. At the boy's home, Barnheiser found hard-working, Mexican-born parents who overloaded the boy with household chores and took him out of school to translate for them. In the Spanish of the barrio, she persuaded them to attend school-sponsored English, parenting and counseling classes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2009 | Jon Thurber
James Thorpe, former director of the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens who helped raise the public profile of the institution, turning it into one of Southern California's leading educational and cultural centers, has died. He was 93. Thorpe, a scholar of English literature and former Princeton University professor, died Jan. 4 at his home in Bloomfield, Conn., according to the Huntington. The cause of death was cerebral vascular disease.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Five Southern Californians were among the 12 recipients of this year's California Educator Awards, announced Thursday by state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig. Janis Gabay, the San Diego Unified School District English teacher chosen earlier as both National Teacher of the Year and California Teacher of the Year, was one recipient of the awards, which carry prizes of $25,000 each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1999 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Southern California were a high school student, his or her parents might not be too pleased with a new report card being issued today. The Southern California Assn. of Governments, the planning agency for the six-county region, for the first time graded aspects of the area's economy, environment and quality of life. The association awarded no A's in any of the nine categories, but issued six Cs and Ds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1999 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Southern California were a high school student, his or her parents might not be too pleased with a new report card being issued today. The Southern California Assn. of Governments, the planning agency for the six-county region, for the first time graded aspects of the area's economy, environment and quality of life. The association awarded no A's in any of the nine categories, but issued six Cs and Ds.
NEWS
July 23, 1998 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County schools posted some of the highest scores in Southern California on a historic test of basic skills, topping every other Southland county in reading and edging close to Orange County in science, while lagging further behind in math. Paced by schools in Camarillo and the Conejo Valley, average scores posted on the Stanford 9 exam ranked Ventura County 19th overall out of the state's 58 counties in reading, 20th in math and 26th in science.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the chief executive of her own bank, Marisol Pineda became well-versed in the intricacies of saving and investing as well as evaluating loan requests. It was a good bank, but it went out of business--not because of a restructuring of the financial marketplace or a merger offer from an expansion-minded competitor. The institution, called Marisol's Bank, closed because the semester ended, explained Marisol, 9, a fourth-grader at Allesandro Elementary School near downtown Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The world's sixth-largest economic power took a big advertisement in Business Week magazine last month to proclaim that it had "just passed Britain and Italy on our way to becoming the fourth-largest world economic power by the year 2000." The boastful nation?
BUSINESS
September 30, 1991 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. business schools crank out 75,000 MBAs a year--nearly a quarter of all the master's degrees awarded annually in the nation and a figure that reflects phenomenal growth since the 6,000 awarded in 1965. And no major metropolitan area has more masters of business administration programs than Southern California. But the boom may be ending. The increase in the number of people applying to MBA programs nationwide seems to be slowing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1988 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
Dukakis got the the bubble gum vote Wednesday. As the band played "Happy Days Are Here Again" and 2,000 delegates at the Kids Convention '88 cheered, credentials manager David Ford, 11, announced that the Democratic presidential nominee, Michael S. Dukakis, had bested Republican candidate George Bush, 53% to 47%. "We as children want to set an example for adults," David told his fellow delegates gathered at Universal Studios. "There is no excuse not to vote."
NEWS
July 23, 1998 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County schools posted some of the highest scores in Southern California on a historic test of basic skills, topping every other Southland county in reading and edging close to Orange County in science, while lagging further behind in math. Paced by schools in Camarillo and the Conejo Valley, average scores posted on the Stanford 9 exam ranked Ventura County 19th overall out of the state's 58 counties in reading, 20th in math and 26th in science.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the chief executive of her own bank, Marisol Pineda became well-versed in the intricacies of saving and investing as well as evaluating loan requests. It was a good bank, but it went out of business--not because of a restructuring of the financial marketplace or a merger offer from an expansion-minded competitor. The institution, called Marisol's Bank, closed because the semester ended, explained Marisol, 9, a fourth-grader at Allesandro Elementary School near downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1995 | STEVEN B. SAMPLE and CHARLES E. YOUNG, Steven B. Sample has been president of USC since 1991; Charles E. Young has been UCLA chancellor since 1968
The athletic rivalry between UCLA and USC has provided extraordinary theater for Southern California and for the nation as a whole for almost seven decades. As the two football teams meet Saturday for their annual battle, Californians from San Diego to San Luis Obispo will be choosing up sides. Those of us who live here have every right to relish this exhilarating week and its wonderful spirit.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1991 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. business schools crank out 75,000 MBAs a year--nearly a quarter of all the master's degrees awarded annually in the nation and a figure that reflects phenomenal growth since the 6,000 awarded in 1965. And no major metropolitan area has more masters of business administration programs than Southern California. But the boom may be ending. The increase in the number of people applying to MBA programs nationwide seems to be slowing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1990 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Physicist Roger Nanes was frustrated. Year after year, freshmen entering his Cal State Fullerton classes showed less and less knowledge of fundamental science and mathematical concepts that are supposed to be taught in high school. UC Irvine chemist Mare Taagepera saw similar flaws in her students. After a little digging, both concluded that many secondary and elementary school science programs were being taught by teachers with little or no science background.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Five Southern Californians were among the 12 recipients of this year's California Educator Awards, announced Thursday by state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig. Janis Gabay, the San Diego Unified School District English teacher chosen earlier as both National Teacher of the Year and California Teacher of the Year, was one recipient of the awards, which carry prizes of $25,000 each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1990 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Physicist Roger Nanes was frustrated. Year after year, freshmen entering his Cal State Fullerton classes showed less and less knowledge of fundamental science and mathematical concepts that are supposed to be taught in high school. UC Irvine chemist Mare Taagepera saw similar flaws in her students. After a little digging, both concluded that many secondary and elementary school science programs were being taught by teachers with little or no science background.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1995 | STEVEN B. SAMPLE and CHARLES E. YOUNG, Steven B. Sample has been president of USC since 1991; Charles E. Young has been UCLA chancellor since 1968
The athletic rivalry between UCLA and USC has provided extraordinary theater for Southern California and for the nation as a whole for almost seven decades. As the two football teams meet Saturday for their annual battle, Californians from San Diego to San Luis Obispo will be choosing up sides. Those of us who live here have every right to relish this exhilarating week and its wonderful spirit.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Julia Barnheiser, an emissary from Santa Ana's Madison Elementary School, knew this case would be tough: The boy was about to be expelled from first grade. He could not behave. He often missed school altogether. At the boy's home, Barnheiser found hard-working, Mexican-born parents who overloaded the boy with household chores and took him out of school to translate for them. In the Spanish of the barrio, she persuaded them to attend school-sponsored English, parenting and counseling classes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Peter Shaffer's psychological drama "Equus" and Bill Johnson's melodramatic study "Dirty Work at the Crossroads" are among the best of Southland high school productions featured today through Sunday at Plummer Auditorium. The two plays, along with Jim Leonard Jr.'s "And They Dance Real Slow in Jackson," are the winners of the Southern California Educational Theatre Assn.'s 19th annual festival. Leonard's work, directed by Walt Stuart for La Jolla High, will be offered tonight at 8 p.m.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|