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Southern California Flower Market

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BUSINESS
February 17, 2008
Thank you so much for your informative article about the Southern California Flower Market. ("Downtown a hothouse for flourishing flower market," Feb. 13.) I had always thought the market's suppliers were local growers, so it was interesting to learn about the "flood of imported flowers." A few days ago, I read another story about the deplorable working conditions many South American flower workers face -- long hours, inadequate protection against toxic chemicals, all sorts of health problems and poverty-level wages.
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BUSINESS
February 17, 2008
Thank you so much for your informative article about the Southern California Flower Market. ("Downtown a hothouse for flourishing flower market," Feb. 13.) I had always thought the market's suppliers were local growers, so it was interesting to learn about the "flood of imported flowers." A few days ago, I read another story about the deplorable working conditions many South American flower workers face -- long hours, inadequate protection against toxic chemicals, all sorts of health problems and poverty-level wages.
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MAGAZINE
June 24, 1990 | Robin Tucker and Downtown Los Angeles Flower Market, 754 Wall St.; (213) 622-1966. and
PURPLISH PINK hydrangeas. Burgundy snapdragons. Sky-blue irises. A Saturday morning visit to the wholesale flower market in downtown Los Angeles ensures a colorful start to a weekend. Bunches of blooms are sold at bargain prices, but you have to get an early start--the market is open only from 6 a.m. to noon (vendors remain open a little later on Saturday, until 1 p.m.), though the action actually starts to wind down by about 8:30 a.m.
MAGAZINE
June 24, 1990 | Robin Tucker and Downtown Los Angeles Flower Market, 754 Wall St.; (213) 622-1966. and
PURPLISH PINK hydrangeas. Burgundy snapdragons. Sky-blue irises. A Saturday morning visit to the wholesale flower market in downtown Los Angeles ensures a colorful start to a weekend. Bunches of blooms are sold at bargain prices, but you have to get an early start--the market is open only from 6 a.m. to noon (vendors remain open a little later on Saturday, until 1 p.m.), though the action actually starts to wind down by about 8:30 a.m.
FOOD
October 31, 2001
"Bachelor Loaf" breads from Oliver's Backerei are a nice size for singles or small families. Each has seven or eight slices and weighs just less than a pound. Use the bread for sandwiches or toast. Seeded six-grain, whole-wheat and country white bachelor loaves, $1.29 to $2.39, from Trader Joe's and Wild Oats stores, and Erewhon, 7660 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 937-0777.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2008 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
James Hatano looks across the floor of the sprawling Southern California Flower Market and acknowledges that he is one of the last links to a bygone age of flower selling in Los Angeles. Hatano, 81, grows poppies, sunflowers, baby's breath and delphiniums on a small rented farm in Rancho Palos Verdes and sells them from a stall at the market. Recalling fondly how Japanese farmers founded the market in 1913, he can't miss the stunning transformation around him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cat is out of the bag about the stealth campaign to save the carnations in the Los Angeles flower district. The popular mainstay of girls' bouquets and guys' boutonnieres was becoming a main course for rodents that sneaked into sprawling floral markets in downtown L.A. "The rats like the little seeds in carnations. We'd see petals all over the floor in the refrigerator and know they'd come in to eat," said grower Philip Sandoval, who sells blossoms at the Southern California Flower Market.
MAGAZINE
February 16, 1992 | Judith Sims, Edited by Mary McNamara
The sellers--100 or so--start arriving as early as 10 p.m. the day before, unloading their wares from giant trucks, small pickups, station wagons, plain old cars. Predominantly Asian-American men, they are the tenants of the Southern California Flower Market and American Florist's Exchange in downtown Los Angeles, which, combined, make up the second-largest floral mall in the country.
IMAGE
August 8, 2010 | By Daina Beth Solomon, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Within the concrete heart of downtown Los Angeles, an area three blocks long and two blocks wide fills with daily shipments of blossoms in every color, size, shape and fragrance imaginable. Bold sunflowers. Delicate baby's breath. Boisterous red roses. Pastel snap dragons. Golden orchids flecked with red. Fluffy white carnations. This is the Los Angeles Flower District — which claims to be the largest wholesale flower market in the United States. Although it caters to wholesale buyers, its marts and shops are open to the public — to everyone who loves wandering through endless floral vistas while observing an industry at work and finding some good bargains, too. Most shoppers visit the two biggest and oldest marts, the Los Angeles Flower Market and the Southern California Flower Market.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is the day to say, "I love you." If you want to prove it, say it with roses. To send your love a dozen red roses today will cost at least $60, and more likely $75. If you want to buy the very best with the longest stems and the richest color, the tab can climb to $100 a dozen. Throw in $5 to $15 for delivery, depending on the location, and you have made a substantial investment in romance.
NEWS
June 21, 1998 | MARNELL JAMESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Monica Meyka collected a lot of frogs before she landed her prince. "It had to do with that whole fairy-tale business," said her sister Marisa. Monica, now 26, began collecting frogs five years ago, about the time she met Rafael Iglesias, 25, the man she married May 30 at Our Lady of Solitude Church in East Los Angeles. The collection now includes some 200 frogs: pictures, figurines, sculptures, garden stones, you name it.
NEWS
December 10, 1998 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jennifer Convy is shopping for holiday decorations, and her first stop is the L.A. Flower District. "This is a resource lots of people don't think about, but I always start any decorating project here. The flower market and an art sup ply store can fill a lot of needs." She is zipping along the 700 block of Wall Street, where more than 100 vendors meld into the bustling hub of downtown L.A.'s flower distribution, which includes the Southern California Flower Market.
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