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NEWS
May 28, 1988 | MICHAEL WELZENBACH
Just as everyone is Irish on St. Patrick's Day, everyone is a wee bit of a Scot during the Annual Scottish Festival at Orange County Fairgrounds in Costa Mesa today and Sunday. We can't all have names that begin with Mac, but don't let that stop you from attending. Robert A. Reoch, the organizer of this year's event and "Chieftain of the Games" for the last seven years, has never let it stop him.
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NEWS
December 8, 1999 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armando Rodriguez spoke only Spanish when he left his native Mexico 12 years ago to find work in Los Angeles. So he came to this country prepared to learn a new tongue. After getting a job as a restaurant dishwasher and kitchen assistant, Rodriguez quickly absorbed new words and expressions by chatting with co-workers and customers. He picked up so much that he never needed to enroll in a formal language class. That's how he came to speak . . . Hebrew. "Lamah loh?" ("Why not?"), Rodriguez asked.
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NEWS
February 19, 1989 | MATHIS CHAZANOV and ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writers
Refugee resettlement efforts in Southern California are about to be overwhelmed by thousands of Jews and Armenians who are backed up in Italy and the Soviet Union waiting for permission to enter the United States. "There is just not enough money and services to serve these people in an expeditious way," said Bruce Whipple, director of the Los Angeles office of the nonprofit International Rescue Committee, which helps find jobs, housing and language training for refugees.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Central American presidents will carry the divisive issue of immigration to next month's Summit of the Americas in Miami, where they plan to tell President Clinton that only improved economies can stanch the northward flow of illegal immigrants.
NEWS
December 8, 1999 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armando Rodriguez spoke only Spanish when he left his native Mexico 12 years ago to find work in Los Angeles. So he came to this country prepared to learn a new tongue. After getting a job as a restaurant dishwasher and kitchen assistant, Rodriguez quickly absorbed new words and expressions by chatting with co-workers and customers. He picked up so much that he never needed to enroll in a formal language class. That's how he came to speak . . . Hebrew. "Lamah loh?" ("Why not?"), Rodriguez asked.
NEWS
January 22, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across the social and cultural experiment known as Southern California--where scores of nationalities from around the world have created a sprawling patchwork of coexistence--an immediate challenge of the Persian Gulf conflict is keeping peace at home. Among the region's millions are 700,000 Jews and 300,000 Arab-Americans--Iraqis, Kuwaitis, Palestinians, Jordanians and others.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Central American presidents will carry the divisive issue of immigration to next month's Summit of the Americas in Miami, where they plan to tell President Clinton that only improved economies can stanch the northward flow of illegal immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1989 | DAVID FERRELL and JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the final Christmas of the 1980s draws near, Arturo Hassan waits every hour for telephone facsimiles out of Panama City--frightening, sometimes contradictory reports that starkly dispel the notion of peace on Earth. The faxes are provided to him by a source he feels compelled to keep secret. They reach him several times a day at his office in Pasadena, detailing every turn in the bloody assault by U.S. troops on fugitive Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega and his forces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wail of air raid sirens on TV strikes terror into the heart of 17-year-old Pourya Khourassani of University High School, catapulting him back to the days when Iraqi missiles rained down on his native Tehran and filled the night air with screams, explosions and breaking glass. For Khourassani's Iraqi classmate Rashid, the footage of U.S.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | BARBARA KOH, Times Staff Writer and Growing numbers of people--mainly newly arrived immigrants--live and work in Southern California with only minimal command of English. To get a flavor of their experience, three bilingual reporters spent time on the streets around Los Angeles, speaking almost no English. Of course, they had the advantage of being able to understand what others were saying to and about them. Marita Hernandez spoke Spanish, Barbara Koh spoke Mandarin and George Stein spoke Russian. Here are their accounts:
The Century City Post Office is tucked in a block-long office complex under renovation, near a health club and a realty office. It's below street level, its entrance set back from the sidewalk. I couldn't find it without asking. "What address? Deli? What are you looking for?" the building security guard guessed. After I said letter in English, he pointed and said, "Take a left, take the outside sidewalk, and turn left." He repeated the instructions, adding, "Mail letter . . . mailbox."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wail of air raid sirens on TV strikes terror into the heart of 17-year-old Pourya Khourassani of University High School, catapulting him back to the days when Iraqi missiles rained down on his native Tehran and filled the night air with screams, explosions and breaking glass. For Khourassani's Iraqi classmate Rashid, the footage of U.S.
NEWS
January 22, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across the social and cultural experiment known as Southern California--where scores of nationalities from around the world have created a sprawling patchwork of coexistence--an immediate challenge of the Persian Gulf conflict is keeping peace at home. Among the region's millions are 700,000 Jews and 300,000 Arab-Americans--Iraqis, Kuwaitis, Palestinians, Jordanians and others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1989 | DAVID FERRELL and JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As the final Christmas of the 1980s draws near, Arturo Hassan waits every hour for telephone facsimiles out of Panama City--frightening, sometimes contradictory reports that starkly dispel the notion of peace on Earth. The faxes are provided to him by a source he feels compelled to keep secret. They reach him several times a day at his office in Pasadena, detailing every turn in the bloody assault by U.S. troops on fugitive Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega and his forces.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | MATHIS CHAZANOV and ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writers
Refugee resettlement efforts in Southern California are about to be overwhelmed by thousands of Jews and Armenians who are backed up in Italy and the Soviet Union waiting for permission to enter the United States. "There is just not enough money and services to serve these people in an expeditious way," said Bruce Whipple, director of the Los Angeles office of the nonprofit International Rescue Committee, which helps find jobs, housing and language training for refugees.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | BARBARA KOH, Times Staff Writer and Growing numbers of people--mainly newly arrived immigrants--live and work in Southern California with only minimal command of English. To get a flavor of their experience, three bilingual reporters spent time on the streets around Los Angeles, speaking almost no English. Of course, they had the advantage of being able to understand what others were saying to and about them. Marita Hernandez spoke Spanish, Barbara Koh spoke Mandarin and George Stein spoke Russian. Here are their accounts:
The Century City Post Office is tucked in a block-long office complex under renovation, near a health club and a realty office. It's below street level, its entrance set back from the sidewalk. I couldn't find it without asking. "What address? Deli? What are you looking for?" the building security guard guessed. After I said letter in English, he pointed and said, "Take a left, take the outside sidewalk, and turn left." He repeated the instructions, adding, "Mail letter . . . mailbox."
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | MICHAEL WELZENBACH
Just as everyone is Irish on St. Patrick's Day, everyone is a wee bit of a Scot during the Annual Scottish Festival at Orange County Fairgrounds in Costa Mesa today and Sunday. We can't all have names that begin with Mac, but don't let that stop you from attending. Robert A. Reoch, the organizer of this year's event and "Chieftain of the Games" for the last seven years, has never let it stop him.
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