Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouthern California Gardens
IN THE NEWS

Southern California Gardens

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
October 18, 1987 | ROBERT SMAUS, Robert Smaus is an associate editor of the Los Angeles Times Magazine.
I MAKE SURE I get to four shows every year--the auto, boat, fishing and garden shows. I like to see what's new, talk to others about my interests and do a little daydreaming. For the first three events, I'm good for about a half-day of looking and talking, but for the Los Angeles Garden Show, held every October at the Los Angeles State and County Arboretum in Arcadia, I always find myself coming back a second day.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
In December, Southern California public gardens aren't so much about what's growing as what's glowing. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, the Living Desert in Palm Desert and the San Diego Botanic Garden open for nighttime lights or luminaria displays. And Scrooge drops in for weekends at Descanso Gardens in La CaƱada Flintridge. Here's a list of holiday happenings at these gardens: Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont: Follow the more than 1,000 candle-lighted luminarias along a loop trail in the garden at night on weekends leading up to Christmas.
Advertisement
OPINION
June 22, 1986
What a pleasure to read your appreciative editorial (June 15) about Victoria Padilla's wonderful book, "Southern California Gardens." I reread it often, and am constantly struck with the wealth of historical information on our horticultural heritage that she put into that one book. Every plant and garden lover in Southern California is in her debt. BESS CHRISTENSEN Lompoc
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
It's time for our annual list of spring garden tours and events, for all you planners. Be sure to check organizers' websites for more information and updates, because some events do sell out. Additions to the list and suggestions are welcome via reader comments. April 6-7: More than 40 gardens, each planted with at least 50% California native plants, will be featured in the 10th annual self-guided tour organized by the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wildflowers and Native Plants . 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days.
OPINION
June 15, 1986
We fell into conversation with Victoria Padilla recently, hoping to learn that she was considering a new edition of her classic "Southern California Gardens." She is not. The book was published in 1961 by the University of California Press in collaboration with the Southern California Horticultural Institute, and now brings upwards of $80 in used-book stores, for there simply is no rival to this extraordinary illustrated history.
HOME & GARDEN
November 14, 2009 | Ilsa Setziol
Fall bulb catalogs are sweetened with alluring eye candy, including those lollipop-shaped alliums. Their large, globed flower heads consist of petite star-like blossoms that shoot from stems rising 2 to 4 feet. But unless you want to dig up the bulbs and refrigerate them for weeks every year, most alliums are temptations to be resisted. Southern California has the warm, dry summers these bulbs favor but not the cold winters they usually require. Joan Citron, editor of "Selected Plants for Southern California Gardens," has tried about 10 kinds in her Reseda garden.
OPINION
April 6, 1986
Two of our gardens' nicest adornments of the moment came a long way to get here, but we have not had much luck finding out the details. Clivia provides that flash of molten yellow, red and orange in shady spots, the brilliant flower stalks emerging from dark-green strap-shaped leaves. Raphiolepis, a now common evergreen shrub, also is at its prime these days, covered with clusters of small, delicate pink blossoms.
MAGAZINE
June 15, 2003
Susan Heeger's series of articles on California native plants was right on the mark (Special Garden Issue, May 18). Angelenos had better start adapting to the realities of our climate, which means adjusting our gardening and landscaping fashions. Heeger's articles also suggested that nonnative plants could be used during those times when native plants tend to look a little weary. However, if more Angelenos were to begin cultivating native plants, more would become commercially available.
HOME & GARDEN
December 12, 2009 | By Lili Singer
Bulbs are the antithesis of an instant landscape, yet many gardeners will wait months for brown, desiccated nubbins to flaunt their foliage, raise their buds to the sun and finally burst into bloom. Fall is the time to plant bulbs, though you'd never know it by visiting Southern California nurseries. Stores should have baskets of bulbs, but gardeners instead often find themselves turning to catalogs and websites, particularly if the search is for miniature narcissus. These peewee daffodils, most of which hail from southwestern Europe and northwestern Africa, often fare well in Southern California gardens.
REAL ESTATE
May 14, 1989 | ROBERT SMAUS, Times Garden Editor and
Southern California gardens are growing up and, as a result, are getting shadier and shadier as trees (and some houses with their second story additions) cast longer or deeper shadows. What do you plant in these shady gardens? You begin with shrubs. Camellias can be the backbone of any shady garden, excelling on the north side of the house or under trees that are not too dense. A shrub called yesterday-today-and-tomorrow, Brunfelsia pauciflora 'Floribunda,' looks somewhat like a camellia and grows to about the same size but has flowers that turn purple, then fade to lavender and finally white (hence the common name)
HOME & GARDEN
December 12, 2009 | By Lili Singer
Bulbs are the antithesis of an instant landscape, yet many gardeners will wait months for brown, desiccated nubbins to flaunt their foliage, raise their buds to the sun and finally burst into bloom. Fall is the time to plant bulbs, though you'd never know it by visiting Southern California nurseries. Stores should have baskets of bulbs, but gardeners instead often find themselves turning to catalogs and websites, particularly if the search is for miniature narcissus. These peewee daffodils, most of which hail from southwestern Europe and northwestern Africa, often fare well in Southern California gardens.
HOME & GARDEN
November 14, 2009 | Ilsa Setziol
Fall bulb catalogs are sweetened with alluring eye candy, including those lollipop-shaped alliums. Their large, globed flower heads consist of petite star-like blossoms that shoot from stems rising 2 to 4 feet. But unless you want to dig up the bulbs and refrigerate them for weeks every year, most alliums are temptations to be resisted. Southern California has the warm, dry summers these bulbs favor but not the cold winters they usually require. Joan Citron, editor of "Selected Plants for Southern California Gardens," has tried about 10 kinds in her Reseda garden.
HOME & GARDEN
February 21, 2009 | Debra Prinzing
Last summer, architect Hugh Maguire stumbled upon the 1931 book "California Gardens" by Winifred Starr Dobyns. While flipping through it, he was startled to find three black-and-white images of what was unmistakably his former backyard in an old Pasadena neighborhood. "Sure enough, there was the wisteria trellis and a scoop-topped gate," he says. "And then I saw the herringbone brick path -- that was the real confirmation."
MAGAZINE
June 15, 2003
Susan Heeger's series of articles on California native plants was right on the mark (Special Garden Issue, May 18). Angelenos had better start adapting to the realities of our climate, which means adjusting our gardening and landscaping fashions. Heeger's articles also suggested that nonnative plants could be used during those times when native plants tend to look a little weary. However, if more Angelenos were to begin cultivating native plants, more would become commercially available.
HOME & GARDEN
May 5, 2001 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two of the best parts about this season: an abundance of spring blooms and garden shows. At these shows, gardeners can find rare and unusual plants, exchange ideas with other plant enthusiasts and attend informative horticultural talks. One of the most popular shows, the 12th annual Southern California Spring Garden Show, runs through Sunday at South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2000 | Patricia Ward Biederman
Lili Singer is the person every Southern California gardener wants to know. For 12 years she was the witty, unstumpable voice of KCRW-FM's "The Garden Show," canceled in 1996 to the consternation of every Angeleno with a problematical begonia or troubled bougainvillea. Until recently, she was co-editor of "The Southern California Gardener," a newsletter focused on local gardens that attracted 7,000 subscribers.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | DEBRA J. HOTALING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Today's topic: snails. "I can't kill them," admits Lili Singer, surveying her backyard. "I can't stand to hear them squish." Phyllis Benenson shakes her head. "I'm ruthless with snails," she says passionately. "I have no problem stepping on them. I cut tomato worms in half with scissors. . . ." Singer shudders. "I know, I know, you pick the snails up very carefully and take them across the street to the empty lot," Benenson says. "No, that was the grasshoppers." "Then what do you do with snails?
NEWS
April 6, 2000 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
A reader wrote recently: "I have just acquired a plot in a community garden, and I am looking forward to starting a vegetable garden." She added, "I am from England and am somewhat confused by the long growing season here in L.A. I would be grateful for any pointers you could share and any resources." Another reader who moved here from the East Coast was surprised to read that early spring was not the time to plant sweet peas (or any edible-podded peas for that matter).
Los Angeles Times Articles
|