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BUSINESS
April 9, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Intercare, which had hoped its operations would be strengthened by its purchase of a competing chain of Southern California health clinics last year, said it will report a "substantial loss" for the fiscal year ended Jan. 31. Officials of the Culver City company had no immediate estimate on how large the loss might be, but company Chairman Philip J. Fagan Jr.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2012 | By Erin Loury, Los Angeles Times
Nothing irks Dr. Bichlien Nguyen more than the herbal supplement ads that fill the airwaves of Vietnamese television and radio. "You'll have bottle No. 1 that will treat your kidney disease, and bottle No. 2 can treat anything from cancer to high blood pressure to diabetes," said Nguyen, an oncologist in Fountain Valley. "It's a mess, it's really bad. " Herbal products and dietary supplements do not receive the same testing and regulatory scrutiny that the Food and Drug Administration applies to drugs.
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NEWS
June 18, 1988 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Though many visitors go to them to shed pounds and inches, health spas offer another allure: They give guests the chance to take a break from their daily pressures and rejuvenate their minds as well as their bodies. After all, to clear the mind and put things back in perspective, there's nothing like enjoying a few days when the weightiest decision is whether to take the 2 p.m. pool aerobics or a muscle-toning class, spa guests say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2011
After reports that a dangerous drug-resistant bacterium, carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae , or CRKP, had spread to at least 356 patients in Southern California last year, Times staff writer Molly Hennessy-Fiske spoke with Dr. Kavita Trivedi, medical epidemiologist with the California Department of Public Health's Antimicrobial Stewardship Program Initiative, about what can be done to reduce the spread of such drug-resistant "superbugs....
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | MATT LAIT and DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
McDonnell Douglas Corp. facilities throughout the Southland are releasing hazardous levels of cancer-causing chemicals that pose "serious health risks" to hundreds of thousands of people, according to a pair of lawsuits filed this week by the state attorney general's office. The suits seek to ensure that McDonnell Douglas notify residents around its facilities of the potential health risks, and that it be ordered to reduce its emission levels of the chemicals.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the foothills of San Bernardino County to the coast of Orange County and the valleys of Los Angeles, Southern Californians breathed the cleanest air on record in the 1990 smog season that officially ended Wednesday, records show. Officials said regulations lowering emissions from cars and industry deserve much of the credit for the dramatic improvement in air quality, but favorable weather also contributed.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The first-ever city by city breakdown of deaths from heart disease and stroke in California shows that residents of Los Angeles suburbs have the highest heart disease risk, while those in the San Francisco Bay Area and the coast of San Diego County have the lowest. Although deaths from cardiovascular diseases in California have declined almost 50% since 1972, an estimated 87,000 people die from them each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1992
McDonnell Douglas Corp. facilities in the Southland are releasing hazardous levels of cancer-causing chemicals that pose "serious health risks" to hundreds of thousands of people, according to lawsuits filed this week by the state attorney general's office. The lawsuits seek to have McDonnell Douglas notify people living near its facilities of the potential health risks and to have the courts order the company to reduce its emissions of the chemicals.
NEWS
December 10, 1989
Although cigarette smoke is far more deadly, air pollutants such as ozone and fine particulate matter are the greatest environmental health threats in Southern California. Exposure to highly polluted air can cause immediate breathing difficulties as well as headaches and eye irritation. With years of exposure, the normal aging of the lungs may speed up. This may contribute to the development of disabling bronchitis and emphysema.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles may have developed a reputation as Tinsel Town across the country, but the region's well-known film industry is now dwarfed in size by a business that was virtually non-existent 20 years ago: health care. Employment in the health industry in Los Angeles County grew to about 240,000 workers in 1986 from 143,000 in 1972, making it the fifth-largest employer behind financial services, tourism, aerospace and wholesale trade, according to figures Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal report released Thursday on a syphilis outbreak in Southern California last year underscores fears that gay and bisexual men's participation in risky sexual practices has increased. More alarming, Centers for Disease Control researchers said, was the finding that at least 34 gay or bisexual men who were part of the 130-case outbreak in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties were aware that they had HIV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI and MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Southern California hospitals are scrambling to treat flu patients and victims of respiratory disease amid a growing shortage of nurses and hospital beds. Feverish patients are waiting as long as six hours to be seen in some emergency rooms, and doctors fear that the wait will only grow as the flu season peaks in coming weeks. Ambulances have increasingly been diverted from overwhelmed hospitals to facilities that aren't as busy.
NEWS
September 10, 1999 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Expanding its role into new territory, the Southland's air pollution agency is crafting a sweeping strategy to reduce the health threat people face from breathing diesel exhaust and other carcinogenic chemicals polluting the air. The ambitious plan, already under attack by the trucking industry, could lead to the nation's first comprehensive regulations for battling airborne toxic substances.
NEWS
September 12, 1998 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cases of viral meningitis have more than tripled in Southern California this year, health officials reported Friday. But they said that the surge in the highly infectious, flu-like disease is not a cause for heightened public concern. This more benign viral form of meningitis, an inflammation of the membrane of the nervous system, sometimes leads to hospitalization for patients who have lost food and fluids through vomiting, experts said.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Checking residential neighborhoods for toxic hot spots, the South Coast Air Quality Management District on Tuesday launched a major venture to determine the cancer risk Southern Californians face from breathing polluted air in their communities, especially people in poor, minority areas. The study, which will last 10 months, is the largest in a decade to monitor California communities for toxic air pollution.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Checking residential neighborhoods for toxic hot spots, the South Coast Air Quality Management District on Tuesday launched a major venture to determine the cancer risk Southern Californians face from breathing polluted air in their communities, especially people in poor, minority areas. The study, which will last 10 months, is the largest in a decade to monitor California communities for toxic air pollution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI and MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Southern California hospitals are scrambling to treat flu patients and victims of respiratory disease amid a growing shortage of nurses and hospital beds. Feverish patients are waiting as long as six hours to be seen in some emergency rooms, and doctors fear that the wait will only grow as the flu season peaks in coming weeks. Ambulances have increasingly been diverted from overwhelmed hospitals to facilities that aren't as busy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal report released Thursday on a syphilis outbreak in Southern California last year underscores fears that gay and bisexual men's participation in risky sexual practices has increased. More alarming, Centers for Disease Control researchers said, was the finding that at least 34 gay or bisexual men who were part of the 130-case outbreak in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties were aware that they had HIV.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Infant mortality rates in Los Angeles and five other Southern California counties dipped and birth outcomes mostly improved in the first half of this decade as more women sought prenatal care in their first trimester of pregnancy, according to a March of Dimes report released Wednesday. "In general, the health of babies and mothers has improved during the 1990s," said Dr. J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1997 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It happens every year at this time in Southern California. The winds whip up the microscopic male sex cells from plants, what we usually call pollen. Airborne by the tens of millions, these barbed spheres are intended to fertilize other plants. Instead, many find their way into the moist nostrils and lungs of humans, causing allergies that can wreak havoc until summer. "It's starting off to be a bad season," said Dr. Arthur Turk, an allergist practicing in Huntington Beach and Tustin.
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