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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1998
In the 1700s, Spanish explorer Gaspar de Portola named many rivers, mountains and valleys as he traveled and made maps of Southern California. That dusty route he took is now the multi-lane Interstate 5. As Southern California's population grows, its history can help us understand our current situation and give us clues into the future. To learn how Southern California has changed over the years, use the direct links on The Times Launchpoint Web site: http://www.latimes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2012 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Mother About to Wash Her Sleepy Child" by Mary Cassatt is a hallmark of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's collection. Warm and fuzzily familiar yet strikingly modern, the 1880 painting has been admired by critics and the public alike since its arrival in Los Angeles 50 years ago - when the museum was still part of a multi-purpose institution in Exposition Park. And where, you might wonder, did the artwork come from? Cassatt was an American Impressionist who spent much of her life in France, so it's not surprising to learn that the painting belonged to collectors in both countries before going on the market at a New York gallery in 1945.
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NEWS
October 24, 1996 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill McCawley has been fascinated by Southern California history since he was a kid growing up in Long Beach in the 1960s, a time when there were still wide open fields waiting to be explored by children hoping to find Indian arrowheads and dinosaur bones. He got his first real glimpse into the history of the area when he took a class at Cal State Long Beach taught by Frank Fenenga.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Anyone following the making of the region-wide, six-month-long 2011 visual arts extravaganza "Pacific Standard Time" knows it as a museum initiative, having grown out of an oral history project by the Getty Research Institute designed to document the birth of the L.A. art scene. And it will culminate with museums, as nearly 50 local institutions are staging exhibitions exploring one big theme: the history of art in Southern California from 1945 to 1980. Now, some of the city's leading commercial galleries are getting in the spirit, organizing their own shows that shine a light on the early days of the L.A. art scene.
NEWS
March 18, 1990
The Workman and Temple Family Homestead Museum in Industry is a six-acre historic site documenting nearly 90 years of Southern California history and culture. It features the historic homes of the Workman and Temple families and what is believed to be the oldest private cemetery in Los Angeles County. 15415 E. Don Julian Road. Information: (818) 968-8492.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2001 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just 12 days after Amelia Earhart disappeared dramatically in the Pacific while attempting an around-the-world flight, a trio of Russian aviators blazing a new polar route had to take an unexpected forced landing--in a Riverside County cow pasture.
BOOKS
July 24, 2005 | Ronald C. Woolsey, Ronald C. Woolsey is the author of several books, including "Migrants West: Toward the Southern California Frontier" and "Will Thrall and the San Gabriels: A Man to Match the Mountains."
Los Angeles and San Diego are bookends to a sprawling landscape of suburbs and industry, although it wasn't always so. Southern California, a land of little water and arid scenery, was willed into existence, an invention of boosters, health seekers, aqueduct builders and immigrants seeking work in plantation-style orange and lemon groves. "Ramona," a 19th century novel that captured the nation's imagination, is part of the inventive spirit that formed Southern California's identity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1996 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and JULIE TAMAKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was only decades ago that drive-in movie theaters joined mom and apple pie in a seemingly eternal pantheon of Americana. But the announcement that one of the last two drive-ins in the San Fernando Valley will be replaced by a gleaming 26-screen megaplex, seems to have marched the drive-in movie theater right into the dustbin of history. "This time, news of the death of the drive-in has not been exaggerated," said CSUN English professor Jack Solomon, an expert on Southern California culture.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some people who know her suspect that Joan Irvine Smith enjoys tweaking the Irvine Co.'s nose almost as much as the prospect of getting more money for her share in the company. The price for both, of course, was giving up her birthright--the last ties to land that had been in her family for more than a hundred years. A Michigan court referee decided Monday that she will get $149 million plus interest for the stock, less than the $330 million plus interest that she wanted.
SPORTS
July 12, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
We are baseball. We are Jackie Robinson sprinting through an overgrown sandlot in Pasadena. We are Walter Johnson stalking through a dreary oil field in Olinda. We are Eddie Murray and Ozzie Smith fighting through the clutter to discover greatness in south Los Angeles. At the same high school. On the same team. We are Don Drysdale and Robin Yount playing in San Fernando Valley towns separated by 11 miles, Bob Lemon and Tony Gwynn playing for Long Beach high schools separated by five minutes.
OPINION
February 22, 2009 | Joe Mathews, Joe Mathews is a contributing writer to Opinion and an Irvine senior fellow at the New America Foundation.
Nearly two years before we learn the results of the 2010 governor's race, the identity of the likely winner is clear: Northern California. More than half of California's population may live south of the Tehachapi Mountains, but the state -- in matters of politics, governance and civic engagement -- is tilting decidedly north. Just look at the race to succeed Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
EARLY next month, much of the local art world will decamp for Paris for a taste of its history as seen through French eyes. "Los Angeles 1955-1985," the Pompidou Center's survey of L.A. art during an invigorating period, will open March 8 with about 350 works by 87 artists, and though the roster is broad, it's been a hot topic of conversation and contention. Is it a love letter to Los Angeles artists from Paris? A skewed view of L.A. art from the Eiffel Tower? A French interpretation of the L.A.
BOOKS
July 24, 2005 | Ronald C. Woolsey, Ronald C. Woolsey is the author of several books, including "Migrants West: Toward the Southern California Frontier" and "Will Thrall and the San Gabriels: A Man to Match the Mountains."
Los Angeles and San Diego are bookends to a sprawling landscape of suburbs and industry, although it wasn't always so. Southern California, a land of little water and arid scenery, was willed into existence, an invention of boosters, health seekers, aqueduct builders and immigrants seeking work in plantation-style orange and lemon groves. "Ramona," a 19th century novel that captured the nation's imagination, is part of the inventive spirit that formed Southern California's identity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2001 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just 12 days after Amelia Earhart disappeared dramatically in the Pacific while attempting an around-the-world flight, a trio of Russian aviators blazing a new polar route had to take an unexpected forced landing--in a Riverside County cow pasture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2000 | Cecilia Rasmussen
In a boarding house in El Monte, before the Civil War, a young woman held court, recounting a tale of living among Indians who had treated her kindly--an unimaginable concept in the frontier West. Olive Oatman, "Cloudwoman" to the tribe of Mojave Indians among whom she had lived, had been unrecognizable when she returned to white society: bare-breasted, wearing a bark skirt, tanned and painted skin and with an indelible dark blue tattoo covering her chin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 19th century Los Angeles, county officials had a simple way to discourage ballot fraud. Handwritten logs gave physical descriptions of voters that often included scars and deformities from the era's rough frontier work. Laborer and Irish immigrant Richard Dwyer, for example, was missing his left foot, according to an inky entry in the leather-bound 1896 registration book.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Iraq invaded Kuwait, curious motorists passing through the Mojave Desert have stopped to ask the way to Bagdad, the California ghost town named in the 1800s for the Middle Eastern capital. "Every day they come into our gas station or restaurant and ask, 'Where's Bagdad? We can't find it,' " said Buster Burris, 81, owner of the town of Amboy, population 27, eight miles east of where maps indicate Bagdad is located. Burris tells them Bagdad is but a memory these days.
MAGAZINE
November 21, 1999 | PATT MORRISON
surely there exists some spindly branch of psychology that can explain why we so often get all worked up about piffle but ignore matters that could split the world asunder.
NEWS
March 15, 1999 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, Susan Cunningham motored around the main drag and back streets of this isolated Mojave desert community, doing her own inventory of a little town in trouble. Pen and paper in hand, the local Chamber of Commerce vice president counted the vacant homes and abandoned storefronts in her unincorporated burg of 2,100 residents on the wind-blown border of Kern and San Bernardino counties, 120 miles northeast of Los Angeles.
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