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NEWS
June 26, 1985
The Hospital Council of Southern California recently received an award from President Ronald Reagan for outstanding private sector initiative. The council was one of 100 organizations recognized by the President for their efforts in finding private solutions to critical social problems. The council was the only health care-related organization in the Western United States so honored.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1987 | ROXANE ARNOLD, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to at least temporarily end the crisis that prompted some Los Angeles hospitals to turn away victims of sexual assault, Mayor Tom Bradley announced Monday that the Southern California Hospital Council has accepted the city's offer to increase reimbursement rates for rape exams from $16 to $200.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1987 | ROXANE ARNOLD, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to at least temporarily end the crisis that prompted some Los Angeles hospitals to turn away victims of sexual assault, Mayor Tom Bradley announced Monday that the Southern California Hospital Council has accepted the city's offer to increase reimbursement rates for rape exams from $16 to $200.
NEWS
April 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Thousands of foreign nurses recruited to ease the U.S. nursing shortage will be forced to return home because federal immigration officials refuse to extend their temporary visas, a newspaper reported Sunday. The foreign-born nurses were admitted to the United States under H-1 visas at the request of employers because of the dire need for their skills, the New York Times reported. The Labor Department officially certified the nursing shortage, the newspaper said, and the American Nurses Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1992
The numbers of riot-related emergency room visits in a section of a chart in Sunday's editions were incorrectly attributed to the Southern California Hospital Council. Listed below are the numbers of visits for 15 hospitals treating many of the riot victims in areas of the greatest devastation, according to a recent poll by the council. (A total of 87 hospitals saw victims of the unrest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1986
Marcida Dodson's article (July 17) about the fine interpreter program for deaf patients at Chapman General Hospital received much interest here at the Dayle McIntosh Center for the Disabled in Garden Grove. We also are concerned with provision of communication assistance for the deaf in medical emergencies. While we applaud the high quality of the program, we want to inform The Times' readers about another option for deaf patients. Commend (Communication Medical Emergency Network for the Deaf)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1988 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
A consumer health advocacy group has filed an administrative complaint against Holy Cross Medical Center in Mission Hills challenging what has become an increasingly widespread policy at Southern California hospitals--refusal to treat Medi-Cal patients. Holy Cross began refusing to hospitalize Medi-Cal patients for all but emergency treatment last month after hospital officials complained that Medi-Cal reimbursement rates were too low to offset their costs.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | Researched by Michael Meyers, Tracy Thomas and Helene Webb
The worst urban riot in contemporary U.S. history exacted its heaviest tolls in inner-city neighborhoods, but other areas throughout Los Angeles County suffered as well. The violence that left dozens dead, thousands injured and caused hundreds of millions of dollars in property damage in Los Angeles also triggered unrest in the nation.
NEWS
June 26, 1985
The Hospital Council of Southern California recently received an award from President Ronald Reagan for outstanding private sector initiative. The council was one of 100 organizations recognized by the President for their efforts in finding private solutions to critical social problems. The council was the only health care-related organization in the Western United States so honored.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1989 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beset with mounting losses and a shrinking clientele, the Roman Catholic order that owns St. Jude Hospital Yorba Linda is weighing whether to close the community hospital or convert it to another use, administrators said Thursday. Among the possibilities being explored are closing, selling or converting the 106-bed hospital to a psychiatric facility, or dedicating it to "elder care," said Thomas J. Porath, vice president of St.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | TIM RUTTEN
Over the last decade, California voters have been asked to pass judgment on ballot initiatives hideously varied and complex. We have been asked to decide whether to rewrite our system of property taxation and our criminal code, and how best to regulate nuclear energy and auto insurance. But we never have had thrust upon us a decision as knotty and far-reaching as that demanded by Proposition 161, the so-called Death With Dignity Act.
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