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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1994 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Ahmet Hadzimujagic and his wife, Aida, led a charmed existence. He was a successful architect. She was a doctor. They owned a bed and breakfast in Srebrenica, then a popular resort town famous for its mineral springs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2009 | Anna Gorman
Before sunrise at an underground parking garage in Los Angeles, Rafael Lugo briefed more than a dozen officers about the day's target: Guatemalan. Skinny. Five feet 10 at most. Likely wearing a blue sweat shirt and a black ball cap. The man, Oliverio Grijalva Carrillo, was suspected of fatally shooting a man in a Guatemalan bar in September before fleeing to the U.S. "He loves to fight," Lugo said in a brusque New York accent. "That's the word out on the street." "Does he speak English?"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They began gathering early Wednesday at the Pico-Union office of El Rescate, a social service group in the heart of Southern California's Central American immigrant community. Everybody had the same question, repeated by Ana Delgado of Long Beach: "Do we have to apply now under the new law?" Thousands of Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants must file papers with immigration courts by Friday or lose their chance to stay permanently in the United States.
MAGAZINE
May 23, 2004 | Arthur R. Vinsel, Arthur R. Vinsel is a San Pedro writer.
My grandmother was a little old Scotswoman who always wore black, even black hats with crinkly black flowers, until her 1951 passing. But her stories were colorful tartan tales of castles, pirates, angels, Indians, even a royal execution. They were more real to me than holy Scripture. Her name was Mary Adam Cannon. She was a frail, bent, white-haired lady born in Kirkintilloch (Church-in-the-Lake), a village beyond that great city Glasgow on the River Clyde.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents of the boxy Craftsman bungalows and Spanish Colonial homes acknowledge that their downtown neighborhood is already overshadowed by jails, courthouses, and numerous social service organizations. But now they say the small community that they've struggled to foster could be destroyed by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, which is planning an expansion project that will mean yet another jail, armed guards, and more traffic in the area.
NEWS
July 21, 1990 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soi Hoang will graduate from Verdugo Hills High School in June, and he hopes to play college volleyball someday. If he does well, he could make an All-American team. That would be a new experience for Hoang, who played on a high school team with students of just about every nationality except Americans. Verdugo Hills finished second in its division of the city playoffs this spring with a team made up entirely of players from Vietnam, China and the Philippines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1990 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter F. Buffa swept onto the City Council four years ago here by avoiding the ubiquitous development debate, focusing his campaign instead on addressing the needs of the city's growing Latino and immigrant community. When Buffa, who has since become mayor, runs for reelection in November, Costa Mesa's treatment of its immigrant community will probably be a hot topic--this time, however, presenting Buffa with a thorny dilemma.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California immigrant rights advocates vowed Friday to fight any attempts by cities to withhold federal grant money from programs that aid illegal aliens, saying the efforts will only heighten already growing animosity toward undocumented workers. The Department of Housing and Urban Development said Thursday that the city of Costa Mesa can enact a policy denying funds to charities and other groups if they refuse to bar illegal aliens from their programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1989 | ANDREA FORD, Times Staff Writer
It did not take long for the little geysers of hatred to erupt earlier this month after local news outlets gave prominent play to what was described as a "melee" between Samoans, who had been attending a bridal shower in Cerritos, and Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies. "One guy called me the next day and wouldn't give his name, but he was furious," Samoan community activist June Pouesi recalled. " 'Why don't you Samoans learn to live here?' he wanted to know.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a summer day in 1990, then 26-year-old Hao Thi Tran, her mother and two sisters were on a plane about to land at Los Angeles International Airport. The four women had changed into ao dais , the traditional Vietnamese dresses that are worn over flowing pants. They were anxious to be reunited with family members they had not seen in 10 years. "We stepped off the plane, and they recognized us first," said Tran, the youngest of nine children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They began gathering early Wednesday at the Pico-Union office of El Rescate, a social service group in the heart of Southern California's Central American immigrant community. Everybody had the same question, repeated by Ana Delgado of Long Beach: "Do we have to apply now under the new law?" Thousands of Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants must file papers with immigration courts by Friday or lose their chance to stay permanently in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents of the boxy Craftsman bungalows and Spanish Colonial homes acknowledge that their downtown neighborhood is already overshadowed by jails, courthouses, and numerous social service organizations. But now they say the small community that they've struggled to foster could be destroyed by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, which is planning an expansion project that will mean yet another jail, armed guards, and more traffic in the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1996 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To understand the future of American politics, look closely at Dana Point and at Orange County, a Stanford University professor says, and keep in mind that in a few years whites will cease to be the majority in California. Around the year 2000, the state estimates, whites will make up less than half of California's more than 31 million people.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1994 | ERROL A. COCKFIELD Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
One might say Mehrdad Pakravan owes a lot to the late Ayatollah Khomeini. Pakravan, who emigrated from Iran in 1978, founded Caltex Trading Inc. in Encino in 1979. That same year, a militant Islamic revolution, led by Khomeini, ousted the government of the late Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, setting off a mass exodus of Iranians fleeing the control of conservative Islamic clergymen.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a summer day in 1990, then 26-year-old Hao Thi Tran, her mother and two sisters were on a plane about to land at Los Angeles International Airport. The four women had changed into ao dais , the traditional Vietnamese dresses that are worn over flowing pants. They were anxious to be reunited with family members they had not seen in 10 years. "We stepped off the plane, and they recognized us first," said Tran, the youngest of nine children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1994 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Ahmet Hadzimujagic and his wife, Aida, led a charmed existence. He was a successful architect. She was a doctor. They owned a bed and breakfast in Srebrenica, then a popular resort town famous for its mineral springs.
NEWS
November 17, 1990 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearby homeowners complained about a thriving immigrant squatter encampment on a Carlsbad hillside, so San Diego County officials took action. Inspectors declared the site a health hazard, forcing shanties to be bulldozed and migrant families evicted. Lawmakers in Costa Mesa, seeking to reduce the proliferation of immigrant day laborers on city streets, tried to cut financial support to charities that provided food, clothing and other aid to undocumented workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1996 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To understand the future of American politics, look closely at Dana Point and at Orange County, a Stanford University professor says, and keep in mind that in a few years whites will cease to be the majority in California. Around the year 2000, the state estimates, whites will make up less than half of California's more than 31 million people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1992 | TERRY SPENCER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service officials announced Wednesday that the agency will move its main immigrant asylum hearing center from Los Angeles to downtown Anaheim by June. The move has angered immigrant rights leaders, who say the majority of asylum seekers live near downtown Los Angeles. But Anaheim city leaders, who previously were reluctant to have the center move to downtown Anaheim because of parking and crowds, have dropped their opposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1991 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Pomona man was sentenced to five years in federal prison Tuesday, completing the successful prosecution of a ring that smuggled undocumented immigrants from central Mexico to Southern California and held them for ransom. Moises Barraza Armenta, 20, was the last of six people to be sentenced after prosecutors used for the first time a federal hostage-taking law designed to combat international terrorism to win stiff sentences for a crime committed inside the United States.
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