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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2001
Re "Irvine School Expels Mascot," May 18: Woodbridge High School bends over backward to appease American Indians' objections to their mascot, but it wasn't enough for activist Eugene Herrod, a board member of the Fountain Valley-based Southern California Indian Center. I am up to my eyeballs with the petty sensitivity of issues like this, which tend to make mountains out of less than molehills. The next thing you know there will a federal fund to study the number of organizations with Indian mascots, Indian names etc. which "offend" others like Herrod.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2001
Re "Irvine School Expels Mascot," May 18: Woodbridge High School bends over backward to appease American Indians' objections to their mascot, but it wasn't enough for activist Eugene Herrod, a board member of the Fountain Valley-based Southern California Indian Center. I am up to my eyeballs with the petty sensitivity of issues like this, which tend to make mountains out of less than molehills. The next thing you know there will a federal fund to study the number of organizations with Indian mascots, Indian names etc. which "offend" others like Herrod.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1994 | LYNN FRANEY
California's largest powwow and Native American arts and crafts show will take place this weekend at the Orange County Fairgrounds in Costa Mesa. Thousands are expected at the 26th annual powwow sponsored by the Southern California Indian Center Inc. They will be able to participate in or watch Native American dances, sample dishes such as the Native American taco--fried dough topped with beans, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and onions--and purchase handmade jewelry and pottery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1995
People with no health insurance and little tradition of using Western medicine often don't realize they have a treatable illness such as hypertension until they end up in the emergency room. A new project reaches two groups with specific health problems, Samoan immigrants and American Indians. It offers to older women in each group health advice and assistance that they can share with their families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1989 | AURELIO ROJAS, United Press International
More than 200 years of painful experiences have engendered a mistrust of government agencies among American Indians, who have gravitated to Los Angeles more than any other U.S. urban center. John Castillo is assistant executive director of the Southern California Indian Center, a nonprofit organization that serves as a conduit between the nation's largest urban Indian population and government social agencies. "Indians won't go to government offices, but they'll come to us," said Castillo, whose organization is staffed primarily by Indians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1990 | WENDY PAULSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sound of jangling bells, drumbeats and wailing chants reverberated as dozens of dancers stomped the ground in a slow-moving, circular pattern. A flurry of bright colors--red, yellow, purple, magenta, green and blue--adorned hundreds of people outfitted with fringed tunics, beadwork, headdresses, feathers, jewelry, moccasins and more.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is an Orange County-based journalist
Here on the West Coast, the Indian powwow is a tradition as ancient as Sputnik. Unlike the Plains Indians, for whom the powwow is an ancient and venerated tradition, the tribes of California never gathered that way and, among themselves, still don't. But when many American Indians throughout the country began to move to urban areas in the second half of the century, the intertribal powwow became a way for Indians from many parts of the nation to stay in touch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1995
People with no health insurance and little tradition of using Western medicine often don't realize they have a treatable illness such as hypertension until they end up in the emergency room. A new project reaches two groups with specific health problems, Samoan immigrants and American Indians. It offers to older women in each group health advice and assistance that they can share with their families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
A black thunderbird sends a message from the Creator to the crows fluttering through a burnt sky, and the crows then deliver that message to the people. That Indian legend is depicted on a goatskin drum at the 23rd Annual Powwow at the Orange County Fairgrounds this weekend. The drum, made by Toby Christopher, is one of many handcrafted items on display and for sale at the powwow, which is one of the largest in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 966-5848
The California Council on Developmental Disabilities recently gave a $50,000 grant to Garden Grove-based Southern California Indian Center Inc. to fund its services for the developmentally disabled. The grant will help the center, at 13252 Garden Grove Blvd., No. 100, develop mental health programs for American Indians with disabilities, provide in-home mental health counseling, help screen fetal alcohol syndrome and monitor medications prescribed by physicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1994 | LYNN FRANEY
California's largest powwow and Native American arts and crafts show will take place this weekend at the Orange County Fairgrounds in Costa Mesa. Thousands are expected at the 26th annual powwow sponsored by the Southern California Indian Center Inc. They will be able to participate in or watch Native American dances, sample dishes such as the Native American taco--fried dough topped with beans, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and onions--and purchase handmade jewelry and pottery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1990 | WENDY PAULSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sound of jangling bells, drumbeats and wailing chants reverberated as dozens of dancers stomped the ground in a slow-moving, circular pattern. A flurry of bright colors--red, yellow, purple, magenta, green and blue--adorned hundreds of people outfitted with fringed tunics, beadwork, headdresses, feathers, jewelry, moccasins and more.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is an Orange County-based journalist
Here on the West Coast, the Indian powwow is a tradition as ancient as Sputnik. Unlike the Plains Indians, for whom the powwow is an ancient and venerated tradition, the tribes of California never gathered that way and, among themselves, still don't. But when many American Indians throughout the country began to move to urban areas in the second half of the century, the intertribal powwow became a way for Indians from many parts of the nation to stay in touch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1989 | AURELIO ROJAS, United Press International
More than 200 years of painful experiences have engendered a mistrust of government agencies among American Indians, who have gravitated to Los Angeles more than any other U.S. urban center. John Castillo is assistant executive director of the Southern California Indian Center, a nonprofit organization that serves as a conduit between the nation's largest urban Indian population and government social agencies. "Indians won't go to government offices, but they'll come to us," said Castillo, whose organization is staffed primarily by Indians.
NEWS
December 19, 1989
The Southern California Indian Center offers a variety of services for American Indians, including reading classes, parenting classes, job referrals and vocational training. There are offices in North Hollywood, Carson, Commerce, Los Angeles and Garden Grove, and staff members are available to speak at churches, schools and community groups.
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