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Southern California Indian Center Inc

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
A black thunderbird sends a message from the Creator to the crows fluttering through a burnt sky, and the crows then deliver that message to the people. That Indian legend is depicted on a goatskin drum at the 23rd Annual Powwow at the Orange County Fairgrounds this weekend. The drum, made by Toby Christopher, is one of many handcrafted items on display and for sale at the powwow, which is one of the largest in California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1999 | Jason Kandel, (714) 966-5848
The California Council on Developmental Disabilities recently gave a $50,000 grant to Garden Grove-based Southern California Indian Center Inc. to fund its services for the developmentally disabled. The grant will help the center, at 13252 Garden Grove Blvd., No. 100, develop mental health programs for American Indians with disabilities, provide in-home mental health counseling, help screen fetal alcohol syndrome and monitor medications prescribed by physicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1994 | LYNN FRANEY
California's largest powwow and Native American arts and crafts show will take place this weekend at the Orange County Fairgrounds in Costa Mesa. Thousands are expected at the 26th annual powwow sponsored by the Southern California Indian Center Inc. They will be able to participate in or watch Native American dances, sample dishes such as the Native American taco--fried dough topped with beans, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and onions--and purchase handmade jewelry and pottery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1998 | GREGORY MENA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Clad in a leather gown covered with yellow and purple beads, Arlene Thompson sought shade and a break from dancing as drums thumped and singers shrieked. "The dancing is mainly for ourselves," said Thompson, who travels from a Navajo reservation in Chinle, Ariz., to perform the Women's Northern Traditional Buckskin Dance at powwows across the nation. "It keeps our spirits and our health up, and it keeps our families together."
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | DUKE HELFAND
Over the years, Rose Moreno was active in community groups, her husband's union and her church. But in each organization, the American Indian said, she always felt a "coolness" from others. Moreno said her experience is far different at the Southern California Indian Center Inc., at 5900 S. Eastern Ave., where she attends weekly senior citizen gatherings. "When I go to the center I feel welcomed. There's a warmth there that I don't get anywhere else," said Moreno, 75.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A German polka band dressed in lederhosen spent much of Saturday playing oompah music within earshot of an Arab-American musician tapping out Middle Eastern chords on an electric keyboard. The smell of Japanese beef teriyaki mingled with the aroma of Mexican burritos, Armenian shish kebab and American beer.
NEWS
July 18, 1995
There are scores of services and books that deal with families and family alternatives. A few of them: SOCIAL SERVICES * ADOPTION / FOSTER CARE Aviva Center 1701 Camino Palermo, Los Angeles 90046. (213) 876-0550 Provides specialized foster care for abused adolescents, summer camp for homeless children. (state, county funding) Bienvenidos Foster Family Agency 1740 Gillette Rd, Ste. 100, Pomona 91769 (909) 622-8099 Abandoned and abused children matched to foster families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1990 | Shannon Sands compiled this Yuletide list
A growing number of Orange County's middle-class and low-income families are facing a meager holiday this year, in part because of the area's high cost of living. Many local organizations, agencies and churches are trying to make the holidays brighter for needy families. Share Our Selves 1550 Superior Ave. Costa Mesa 92627 (714) 642-3451 or 549-2001 After a long hiatus, SOS is opening again this week.
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Old bicycles and young kids don't go together: Eager legs that want to go fast can't turn cranks looped with rusty chains, and loose handlebars and seats make navigating a struggle. Yet, at a 6-month-old group home in Fullerton, Star 6 Children's Foundation, abused and neglected boys ride dilapidated bikes. "The [bikes] were in good shape, but kids are hard on things like that, like all kids are, so a couple of them got busted up," said Richard Gayton, director of the group home.
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