Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouthern California Institute
IN THE NEWS

Southern California Institute

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne
Raimund Abraham, an Austrian-born architect known for his powerfully enigmatic drawings and fierce idealism, and whose narrow, blade-like 2002 Austrian Cultural Forum building in New York is among the most forceful pieces of architecture built in the last decade, was killed early Thursday when the car he was driving collided in downtown Los Angeles with a Metropolitan Transportation Authority bus. He was 76. The accident, at 5th and Main streets, came...
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
It was in Los Angeles that Tokyo-born Shigeru Ban, the 2014 winner of the Pritzker Prize, first studied architecture. Well, in Santa Monica, to be exact. Ban attended the fledgling Southern California Institute of Architecture in the late 1970s, right after finishing high school in Japan. "I wanted to go to Cooper Union and study with John Hejduk, but I found out that Cooper Union didn't accept foreign students," Ban said of the experimental New York school. "They only accepted foreign students transferring from another U.S. school.
Advertisement
REAL ESTATE
June 25, 1989
Steven C. Fiano, a fifth-year architecture student at Cal Poly Pomona, has been awarded the second annual $1,000 William Z. Landworth Memorial Scholarship by the associates of the Los Angeles chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Two other scholarships of $500 each went to Barbara Anne Bestor, a graduate student at Southern California Institute of Architecture, and Pablo Maida, a Fourth-year student at Woodbury University.
SPORTS
November 26, 2013 | Chris Erskine
In 1972, teen workers at a couple of Anaheim fast food joints gathered - like Pilgrims - to compete in their first-ever Thanksgiving football showdown. On Thursday, they will mark their 42nd Turkey Bowl, a tribute not just to tradition, but to lunacy and camaraderie, to bloody knees and the sort of sludgy soreness that seeps into your bones for a couple of days after. That's right, 42 years. "I think we have only a couple of more to go," says one of the ringleaders, Steve Enke, now 57. "In the 1990s, we said, let's make it to 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2009
Ball-Nogues: An article last Sunday about architects Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues stated that the duo would be installing an 18-inch suspension project inside L.A.'s Centinela Area Building and Safety Permit Office. The project is 18 feet in size. In addition, a reference to their work on a three-story plastic form at this year's Coachella festival should have included the fact that the project was done in collaboration with students at the Southern California Institute of Architecture.
REAL ESTATE
June 25, 1989
Two summer programs are being offered by the Southern California Institute of Architecture for professionals and the public. The Professional Development Program focuses on contemporary issues in architecture and urban design, real estate development, presentation techniques and related subjects. It offers day and evening courses or weekend workshops starting Monday through Aug. 31. The school will again offer Making and Meaning, an intensive five-week course for those contemplating a career in architecture.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
It was in Los Angeles that Tokyo-born Shigeru Ban, the 2014 winner of the Pritzker Prize, first studied architecture. Well, in Santa Monica, to be exact. Ban attended the fledgling Southern California Institute of Architecture in the late 1970s, right after finishing high school in Japan. "I wanted to go to Cooper Union and study with John Hejduk, but I found out that Cooper Union didn't accept foreign students," Ban said of the experimental New York school. "They only accepted foreign students transferring from another U.S. school.
MAGAZINE
May 11, 1997
As a young architect and former Frank Gehry employee, I take exception to Nicolai Ouroussoff's assertion that during the early '90s, "Unlike the East Coast scene . . . there was no clear theoretical center here" ("Basic Instinct," April 6). Most of the architects he mentions--including Buresh, Lubowicki, Mayne, Moss and Rotondi--were teaching at the Southern California Institute of Architecture, better known as SCI-Arc. As a graduate student at London's Architectural Assn. in 1990, all I heard about was the Los Angeles scene and SCI-Arc.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Marissa Gluck
It's unlikely that residents of Mount Washington ever envisioned a metal-clad trapezoid sitting on this bend of Cazador Street, but the design - dubbed the Big and Small House by its architect, Simon Storey - is full of surprises. The home sits on a lot once considered unbuildable because of its steep grade and diminutive size - at 2,500 square feet, about half the typical L.A. lot. Inside, however, the 900-square-foot house feels large and airy despite those space constraints. Owners Joyce Campbell and Jon Behar met Storey a decade ago, when he was a graduate student at the Southern California Institute of Architecture, and hired him to remodel their Mount Washington house.
NEWS
January 14, 1996
Re "Whatever Happened to the Architect Groupies?" (Jan. 2): The architects missed their opportunity to "penetrate the public consciousness" by not putting their show on TV during the '80s. The American Institute of Architects' awards should have been presented on TV with music, dancers and the envelope. Awards shown only in architectural magazines reached an audience limited to those who competed for the awards. The public was not educated to know that many stars and runners-up exist in the world of architecture and they are beautiful, eccentric, temperamental and sometimes sexy.
NEWS
October 11, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
The Czech Republic entry in the 2013 Solar Decathlon won the architecture portion of the 19-team university competition Friday, but as the event sped toward its conclusion Sunday at the Orange County Great Park in Irvine, a team of students from Austria surged into the overall lead. Czech Technical University students placed first in the architecture judging with a minimalist studio partially wrapped in wood slat canopy. As we noted in a previous article , the design not only cools living spaces with beautiful simplicity but also creates ethereal moments when walking through the structure.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
It might be the most carefully hidden building boom in American architectural history. Over the last 40 years, beginning with strict drug-sentencing laws introduced in 1973 by New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller and quickly copied around the country, the number of prisons in this country has more than tripled, from 600 to nearly 2,000. In California, where the inmate population surged a staggering tenfold from 1975 to 2010, the construction of jails and prisons has accelerated even more quickly.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2013 | By Marcia Adair
The first day of school, one of America's great communal experiences. Pencils are sharpened, backpacks bought and outfits laid out, found to be totally lame, OMG, and laid out again. But what today's kids in Los Angeles public schools will experience on Days 2 through 180 is significantly different from what their parents enjoyed when it comes to music, art, drama and field trips. For a variety of reasons, funds available to school boards for education in California have been devastated over the last 20 years, to levels some in the industry call the worst in U.S. history.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
"Everything Loose Will Land" has landed. And its timing could hardly be better. The exhibition at the MAK Center in West Hollywood, curated by UCLA architectural historian and critic Sylvia Lavin, is a wry study of the ways Los Angeles artists and architects worked with, leaned on, stole from and influenced one another in the 1970s. In a larger sense, it charts the way Southern California architects threw off the influence of establishmen Modernism and helped remake the profession in that decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
Two Southern California cultural institutions will be honored at the White House on Wednesday. The Discovery Science Center in Santa Ana and the Rancho Cucamonga Public Library are among the 10 institutions selected from among 33 finalists around the country to receive a 2013 National Medal for Museum and Library Service -- the nation's highest honor for community service in those two fields. First Lady Michelle Obama - along with representatives of the The Institute of Museum and Library Services - will present the awards.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Marissa Gluck
It's unlikely that residents of Mount Washington ever envisioned a metal-clad trapezoid sitting on this bend of Cazador Street, but the design - dubbed the Big and Small House by its architect, Simon Storey - is full of surprises. The home sits on a lot once considered unbuildable because of its steep grade and diminutive size - at 2,500 square feet, about half the typical L.A. lot. Inside, however, the 900-square-foot house feels large and airy despite those space constraints. Owners Joyce Campbell and Jon Behar met Storey a decade ago, when he was a graduate student at the Southern California Institute of Architecture, and hired him to remodel their Mount Washington house.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
"Everything Loose Will Land" has landed. And its timing could hardly be better. The exhibition at the MAK Center in West Hollywood, curated by UCLA architectural historian and critic Sylvia Lavin, is a wry study of the ways Los Angeles artists and architects worked with, leaned on, stole from and influenced one another in the 1970s. In a larger sense, it charts the way Southern California architects threw off the influence of establishmen Modernism and helped remake the profession in that decade.
HOME & GARDEN
September 23, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Its creators call it CHIP — the Compact, Hyper-Insulated Prototype. But onlookers say the 733-square-foot house looks like a pillow or even a spacesuit because of its quilted exterior: Insulation is stretched around the frame rather than stuffed inside it. Despite those first impressions — or perhaps because of them — CHIP is turning heads on the National Mall in Washington D.C. this week along with 19 other competitors in the U.S. Department of...
BUSINESS
April 22, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
L.A.'s renegade, nomadic architecture school is finally putting down roots. The Southern California Institute of Architecture, one of the top-rated schools in the country for design, bought itself a home in downtown Los Angeles on Thursday. SCI-Arc, as it is commonly known, paid $23.1 million for a highly unorthodox school building. SCI-Arc bought a century-old rail freight depot that is a quarter of a mile long and about 37 feet wide. The school has been a tenant in the building for 10 years, having failed in an earlier attempt to buy the property.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|