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BUSINESS
March 5, 1990 | From United Press International
State Agency Files RICO Suit: The State Compensation Insurance Fund said it had filed a civil racketeering suit in U.S. District Court against a group of its former customers. The suit charges that seven Southern California labor leasing companies conspired to misrepresent their business and misreport their payrolls to reduce the cost of their workers' compensation coverage from State Compensation, the independent state agency which is the largest workers' compensation carrier in California.
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BUSINESS
January 29, 2009 | Ronald D. White
Southern California Gas Co. and the union representing its workers are running out of negotiating time on a labor contract that expires this weekend. A strike could begin as early as midnight Saturday against the company that serves more than 20.3 million consumers in Southern California. On Sunday, Local 132 of the Utility Workers Union of America, AFL-CIO, asked its members for an authorization vote that would give the union the right to call a walkout if negotiations fail.
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BUSINESS
September 25, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's easy to miss the turnoff for Francisco Saravia. Pick the wrong time to pass one of the trucks that creep along the two-lane highway, belching smoke at trailing motorists, and you will have passed the entrance. A small woods hides the village from the main road. But follow the right strip of pavement for a few curving miles and you might believe you have driven straight out of rural Mexico into a Los Angeles suburb.
NEWS
June 19, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first comprehensive study of Southern California's day laborers has found a surprising range of experience and wages among the men who gather on urban street corners and in hardware store parking lots, indicating that a significant share prefer the unstable work to more traditional low-wage jobs. UCLA researchers over the past two years interviewed 481 jornaleros at 87 sites, including eight hiring centers built and operated by cities and nonprofit organizations.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1988 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
Working 9 to 5 may not be everyone's idea of a great way to make a living, but in much of Southern California, having clerical skills can just about guarantee a job, a new survey suggests. One-fourth to one-half of employers in most parts of the Southland expect to be hiring office workers during the first six months of 1989, according to a survey of 1,500 California businesses by Irvine-based Thomas Temporaries.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1992 | HARRY BERNSTEIN, TIMES LABOR COLUMNIST
Skilled workers in the construction industry were once referred to as the "aristocrats of labor," so it isn't surprising that in the early part of this century most of them successfully encouraged their children--almost always boys--to learn their trades. The pay was, and still is, relatively good, although the work is often interrupted by everything from bad weather to economic downturns. But construction work, while strenuous, often is more satisfying to people than routine office jobs.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most of her friends will be at work this Friday, Barbara Davenport plans to do her Christmas shopping. Davenport, a payroll coordinator at Builders Emporium's corporate headquarters in Irvine, will be able to avoid the weekend shopping crush because she is participating in a company program allowing her to work only four days a week. As a result, three-day weekends have become a way of life for Davenport in the past 14 months.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA
The Thomas Staffing survey also knocked down a widely held perception that the use of alternative work arrangements such as flex-time, job sharing and telecommuting have become commonplace. In its study, 80% of Southern California companies said they don't offer such alternative work schedules for their employees. Slack believes that will soon change. The tightening job market will force employers to adopt more innovative approaches to attract and retain workers, he said.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leading health plan being debated in Congress places a far weaker safety net under workers in Southern California than in other areas because it exempts the small businesses that account for an unusually large segment of the region's employment. The reform proposal crafted by Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) and endorsed by President Clinton exempts firms with fewer than 25 workers permanently from any future mandates requiring businesses to help pay for health benefits.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leading health plan being debated in Congress places a far weaker safety net under workers in Southern California than in other areas because it exempts the small businesses that account for an unusually large segment of the region's employment. The reform proposal crafted by Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) and endorsed by President Clinton exempts firms with fewer than 25 workers permanently from any future mandates requiring businesses to help pay for health benefits.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA
The Thomas Staffing survey also knocked down a widely held perception that the use of alternative work arrangements such as flex-time, job sharing and telecommuting have become commonplace. In its study, 80% of Southern California companies said they don't offer such alternative work schedules for their employees. Slack believes that will soon change. The tightening job market will force employers to adopt more innovative approaches to attract and retain workers, he said.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1998 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the mammoth manufacturing trade show Westec '98 rolls into the Los Angeles Convention Center next week, area companies will get a glimpse of the latest tools of the trade. Too bad all those high-tech cutters, lathes and CAD/CAM systems won't come with the skilled operators needed to run them.
NEWS
May 25, 1996 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you were looking for a good machinist, Southern California use to be the place to find one. Now it's a place where employers import their machinists from other countries. They hold jobs open for years because they can't find workers to fill them. And they spend years--seven or more--trying to teach employees on the job because they can't recruit them ready-trained. "You don't find qualified machinists anymore," said Antonio Candia of ACL Development, a Canoga Park machine shop.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leading health plan being debated in Congress places a far weaker safety net under workers in Southern California than in other areas because it exempts the small businesses that account for an unusually large segment of the region's employment. The reform proposal crafted by Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) and endorsed by President Clinton exempts firms with fewer than 25 workers permanently from any future mandates requiring businesses to help pay for health benefits.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leading health plan being debated in Congress places a far weaker safety net under workers in Southern California than in other areas because it exempts the small businesses that account for an unusually large segment of the region's employment. The reform proposal crafted by Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) and endorsed by President Clinton exempts firms with fewer than 25 workers permanently from any future mandates requiring businesses to help pay for health benefits.
NEWS
January 21, 1994 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI and JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although thousands of Angelenos remained at least temporarily out of work Thursday, some labor experts predicted that Monday's devastating earthquake would ultimately cost fewer jobs than the 30,000 lost after the 1992 Los Angeles riots. Still, state officials said they are preparing for a surge in unemployment insurance claims from workers displaced by the magnitude 6.6 temblor.
NEWS
January 21, 1994 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI and JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although thousands of Angelenos remained at least temporarily out of work Thursday, some labor experts predicted that Monday's devastating earthquake would ultimately cost fewer jobs than the 30,000 lost after the 1992 Los Angeles riots. Still, state officials said they are preparing for a surge in unemployment insurance claims from workers displaced by the magnitude 6.6 temblor.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Because home prices soared and once-far-flung suburbs became economic hubs, more Southern Californians are living in one county and working in another, the U.S. Census Bureau reported today. Meanwhile, on a national scale, established metropolitan areas, including Los Angeles, are drawing a smaller proportion of their work force from outlying areas, reflecting "a continued decentralization of workplaces as well as residences," said Census Bureau analyst Phillip Salopek, who authored the study.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Because home prices soared and once-far-flung suburbs became economic hubs, more Southern Californians are living in one county and working in another, the U.S. Census Bureau reported today. Meanwhile, on a national scale, established metropolitan areas, including Los Angeles, are drawing a smaller proportion of their work force from outlying areas, reflecting "a continued decentralization of workplaces as well as residences," said Census Bureau analyst Phillip Salopek, who authored the study.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Because home prices soared and once-far-flung suburbs became economic hubs, more Southern Californians are living in one county and working in another, the U.S. Census Bureau reported today. Meanwhile, on a national scale, established metropolitan areas, including Los Angeles, are drawing a smaller proportion of their work force from outlying areas, reflecting "a continued decentralization of workplaces as well as residences," said Census Bureau analyst Phillip Salopek, who authored the study.
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