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Southern California Labor

NEWS
December 22, 1992 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Because home prices soared and once-far-flung suburbs became economic hubs, more Southern Californians are living in one county and working in another, the U.S. Census Bureau reported today. Meanwhile, on a national scale, established metropolitan areas, including Los Angeles, are drawing a smaller proportion of their work force from outlying areas, reflecting "a continued decentralization of workplaces as well as residences," said Census Bureau analyst Phillip Salopek, who authored the study.
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BUSINESS
June 10, 1992 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of men who put drywall in new homes all over Southern California have walked off the job, shutting down work at housing tracts from Los Angeles to the Mexican border. The men, most of them Latinos, say they are paid less now than 10 years ago, before home builders and their subcontractors broke the union during the last recession. Since then, the labor force for the Southern California drywall business has become overwhelmingly Latino.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1992 | HARRY BERNSTEIN, TIMES LABOR COLUMNIST
Skilled workers in the construction industry were once referred to as the "aristocrats of labor," so it isn't surprising that in the early part of this century most of them successfully encouraged their children--almost always boys--to learn their trades. The pay was, and still is, relatively good, although the work is often interrupted by everything from bad weather to economic downturns. But construction work, while strenuous, often is more satisfying to people than routine office jobs.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Sanders, once accustomed to a six-figure income and the perks of the executive life, now is struggling as a fledgling entrepreneur and often wonders whether he ever again will be a top boss at a big company. Mario Orellano, laid off as a plumber at Lockheed Corp. and dismayed over the high cost of housing in the Southland, plans to pack up and try to find a new job and home in Las Vegas.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1991 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business had grown steadily at the Ralphs market in La Crescenta, during times of growth and during times of recession--until this year. Even in this affluent suburb, where household incomes average $60,674 a year, people are spending less on Dove Bars and more on staples such as flour, sugar and cooking oil. "The first thing my manager asked was, 'Where did all the business go?' " said Ralphs Grocery Co. Chairman Byron Allumbaugh after a recent visit to the store.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1991 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The television set in the employee break room was already switched to Gulf War news coverage when Alfredo Vela showed up for work early Monday morning at City Hall in the City of Commerce. Vela watched reports of the massive allied ground offensive with a handful of other workers--a far cry from the anxious crowd of more than a dozen employees who used to gather during the early days of the war.
NEWS
October 26, 1990 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As truck driver Dave Brown, 32, lined up to apply for jobless benefits at a San Diego unemployment office one day last week, the cross-country food hauler looked uncomfortably around the quiet room. "This is such a terrible feeling," said Brown, who lost his job earlier this month, leaving him out of work for the first time since he started earning a living 12 years ago. "I'm about as close to the economy as a lay person gets, and I think something bad is going to happen soon."
BUSINESS
September 25, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's easy to miss the turnoff for Francisco Saravia. Pick the wrong time to pass one of the trucks that creep along the two-lane highway, belching smoke at trailing motorists, and you will have passed the entrance. A small woods hides the village from the main road. But follow the right strip of pavement for a few curving miles and you might believe you have driven straight out of rural Mexico into a Los Angeles suburb.
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