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Southern California Physicians Insurance Exchange

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1992 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accusing Dr. Ivan C. Namihas of lying on his medical insurance application, the company that approved a policy for the embattled Tustin gynecologist asked a judge Friday to declare the coverage null and void and to clear the company of any legal liabilities. The legal action came after the Medical Board of California formally voted this week to revoke Namihas' medical license.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1992 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accusing Dr. Ivan C. Namihas of lying on his medical insurance application, the company that approved a policy for the embattled Tustin gynecologist asked a judge Friday to declare the coverage null and void and to clear the company of any legal liabilities. The legal action came after the Medical Board of California formally voted this week to revoke Namihas' medical license.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
State Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi announced Tuesday that a third medical malpractice insurer, The Doctors Co., has agreed to rebate $18.5 million under the terms of Proposition 103 to 9,500 doctors who are its policyholders. Two other malpractice companies, Norcal Mutual and the Southern California Physicians Insurance Exchange, had earlier agreed to give back a total of $50.6 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1986
Your editorial calling for a look at the books of the insurance industry before more tort reforms are enacted is a simple-minded repetition of Ralph Nader's slogans for more government control of every business. It also shows gross ignorance of how this business is regulated. You say the liability crisis is real, but incredibly go on to suggest that insurance companies may not need all that premium money. Any doubts about the high cost of the crisis, and its cause, can be resolved by looking at self-insured governmental entities, here or elsewhere, who pay no premiums to insurance companies and yet are staggered by the cost of lawsuits.
NEWS
January 22, 1991
Sanford F. Rothenberg, former president of the Los Angeles County Medical Assn., past chief of neurosurgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and vice president of Southern California Physicians Insurance Exchange, which he helped found in the 1970s at the height of the malpractice insurance crisis, is dead. Rothenberg, a graduate of USC and UC Berkeley School of Medicine, was 71 when he died of cancer Friday at his Century City home.
NEWS
October 6, 1985
Allan Parachini's article gives a distorted view of the true picture of the practice of medicine. It seems designed to inflame people to sue doctors and cause even more nuisance claims. While that result may not have been Parachini's goal, it is clearly the goal of Ralph Nader, who has spent decades trying to undercut the practice of medicine. The article appears to cover pros and cons of the Nader "study" about physician discipline, but displays gross ignorance of what is really going on. Percentages of doctors disciplined means nothing unless the criteria are established and are universal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1986 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A woman whose child suffered brain damage when doctors waited 10 hours to perform a Caesarean section has accepted a settlement worth $2.9 million from two doctors and Fountain Valley Regional Hospital, according to attorneys involved in her lawsuit. Erica Jacobson of Fountain Valley claimed that her first pregnancy had been uneventful until one Sunday evening in 1983 when she felt severe pains and checked into the hospital at 11 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1986 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
Four-year-old Annie Arredondo will never see the new home her parents plan to buy. Annie is the victim of a hereditary disorder called retinoblastoma, a congenital ailment that causes malignant tumors, which required the removal of her eyes at age 2. On Wednesday, her parents, Roy and Diana, agreed to an out-of-court settlement of their malpractice claim against Annie's doctor estimated to be worth $1 million.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1988 | S. J. DIAMOND
On their first visit to a doctor's office, new patients may be asked to skim and sign an arbitration agreement, promising that if the doctor messes up their case, they'll take the dispute to an arbitration hearing instead of to court. "I figure it's just to protect the doctors," says a woman who wouldn't sign her obstetrician's form, "because juries can award big money." True, a patient could get less from arbitration. But less, as they say, is more.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Tustin gynecologist Ivan C. Namihas, who escaped state criminal charges despite more than 100 sexual abuse complaints by his patients, was indicted Wednesday on mail fraud charges for allegedly billing patients and insurers for unnecessary tests and treatments.
NEWS
December 23, 1994 | MARYANN HAMMERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fran and Keith Gochmanosky wanted justice. Their 9-year-old son had undergone surgery to have 70% of his tongue removed because his pediatrician had overlooked a tumor in the boy's mouth. Distraught over the realization that their son would be haunted throughout his life--every time he speaks, interviews for a job or kisses a girl--the Gochmanoskys decided to take the doctor to court.
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