Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouthern California Politics
IN THE NEWS

Southern California Politics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the Sunday before Election Day, 1990, thousands of San Diego churchgoers returned to their cars after services only to encounter a sermon of another sort. "Cast your ballot for a pro-life, pro-family future," said a political flyer that had been placed on windshields. "The candidates on this slate espouse strong, traditional family values and oppose the senseless killing of innocent, unborn children for reasons of sex selection, birth control and convenience."
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 1, 2007 | Brian Doherty, BRIAN DOHERTY is a senior editor of Reason magazine and the author of "Radicals for Capitalism: A Freewheeling History of the Modern American Libertarian Movement."
THE science fiction writer Robert A. Heinlein was born in Missouri, and his fiction was mostly set in the future and on distant planets. But there's no question that Heinlein -- born 100 years ago this week -- was one of Southern California's great prophets. He lived in Los Angeles in the 1930s and '40s, and first turned to writing because of looming mortgage payments after his failed campaign in 1938 to represent Hollywood in the Assembly.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2001 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles mayoral finalist James K. Hahn is sticking so close to Mayor Richard Riordan, hoping for an endorsement for the June 5 runoff, that you could call him "Maxi-Me." (At 6 feet 3, Hahn is too tall to qualify as "mini" anything.) Despite the hardly secret years-long antipathy between the two, Hahn was in the audience at a Los Angeles Times Festival of Books event honoring Riordan's work for literacy, then found his way upstairs afterward to a private reception, hovering close.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2001 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles mayoral finalist James K. Hahn is sticking so close to Mayor Richard Riordan, hoping for an endorsement for the June 5 runoff, that you could call him "Maxi-Me." (At 6 feet 3, Hahn is too tall to qualify as "mini" anything.) Despite the hardly secret years-long antipathy between the two, Hahn was in the audience at a Los Angeles Times Festival of Books event honoring Riordan's work for literacy, then found his way upstairs afterward to a private reception, hovering close.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani canceled a fund-raising trip to Southern California, saying on Monday that he has still not decided whether to run for the Senate against First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton or what course of treatment he'll take for his prostate cancer. Giuliani said he still needs to consult with doctors and decide whether to undergo surgery or radiation treatment. "Last week, because of things involving my personal life, my family and everything else, I didn't have the time," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1996 | Judith Michaelson, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
Mornings you can hear Bill Handel on KFI-AM, decrying the notion "that somehow illegal aliens should have the benefits of education and health care, and the right to work in this state. . . . 'Gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme'--and you pay for it. That's right, America, you pay for these Mexicans and Hondurans and El Salvadorans and Guatemalans who come up over the border."
BUSINESS
May 27, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Prosperity has returned at last to Southern California's economy. Now if only wisdom were to follow, we could be assured the region will fulfill its great potential in the years ahead. But the ballot initiatives for Tuesday's statewide primary election are characterized by argument and division, not wisdom. And that promises to reinforce a worrisome trend of bitter differences that constantly threatens progress in Southern California's economy.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Two years after approval of a far-reaching strategy to restore blue skies to the smoggy South Coast Air Basin by the year 2010, there is a growing consensus among environmentalists, business executives, government officials and air quality regulators themselves that the goal cannot be met.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the prodding of Gov. George Deukmejian, agricultural officials initiated a new effort Wednesday to counter growing public opposition to the application of pesticides over Southern California neighborhoods infested with the Mediterranean fruit fly. Medfly project officials held the first of what they said would be a series of weekly press conferences to tell their side of the eradication effort.
NEWS
July 17, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's Iranian Americans, reclusive and apolitical since the U.S. hostage crisis two decades ago, are beginning to use their considerable numbers and wealth to influence policy inside and outside Iran. No longer do they call themselves "Persian" or "Middle Eastern" to escape American animosity born when militant students laid siege to the U.S. Embassy in Tehran on Nov. 4, 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Not again, Southern California leaders groaned Friday as they absorbed the Census Bureau's recommendation against adjusting its 2000 head count upward to factor in more than 3 million overlooked Americans. As it did in the 1990s, the region may lose billions of dollars in federal funds if Congress and the Bush administration accept the recommendation and extend it beyond the realm of election redistricting.
NEWS
July 17, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's Iranian Americans, reclusive and apolitical since the U.S. hostage crisis two decades ago, are beginning to use their considerable numbers and wealth to influence policy inside and outside Iran. No longer do they call themselves "Persian" or "Middle Eastern" to escape American animosity born when militant students laid siege to the U.S. Embassy in Tehran on Nov. 4, 1979.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani canceled a fund-raising trip to Southern California, saying on Monday that he has still not decided whether to run for the Senate against First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton or what course of treatment he'll take for his prostate cancer. Giuliani said he still needs to consult with doctors and decide whether to undergo surgery or radiation treatment. "Last week, because of things involving my personal life, my family and everything else, I didn't have the time," he said.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1998 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Prosperity has returned at last to Southern California's economy. Now if only wisdom were to follow, we could be assured the region will fulfill its great potential in the years ahead. But the ballot initiatives for Tuesday's statewide primary election are characterized by argument and division, not wisdom. And that promises to reinforce a worrisome trend of bitter differences that constantly threatens progress in Southern California's economy.
NEWS
April 13, 1998 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political awakening of the new immigrant barrios of Southern California began with the enduring dreams of an exiled Mexican college student whose travels took him to a crowded town hall meeting in Watts. It began, too, with a small group of former Salvadoran revolutionaries who one day found themselves, against all expectations, pledging allegiance to a country they had once despised. And it began with an anti-Proposition 187 leaflet placed in the hand of a 15-year-old girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1996 | Judith Michaelson, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
Mornings you can hear Bill Handel on KFI-AM, decrying the notion "that somehow illegal aliens should have the benefits of education and health care, and the right to work in this state. . . . 'Gimme, gimme, gimme, gimme'--and you pay for it. That's right, America, you pay for these Mexicans and Hondurans and El Salvadorans and Guatemalans who come up over the border."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Not again, Southern California leaders groaned Friday as they absorbed the Census Bureau's recommendation against adjusting its 2000 head count upward to factor in more than 3 million overlooked Americans. As it did in the 1990s, the region may lose billions of dollars in federal funds if Congress and the Bush administration accept the recommendation and extend it beyond the realm of election redistricting.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The overriding axiom of California politics since a massive shift of power in the 1960s has been that the votes and money--and therefore successful candidates--lie south of the Tehachapi Mountains. But look what happened in Tuesday's primary election: Democrats nominated almost a solid slate of northerners for statewide office.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the Sunday before Election Day, 1990, thousands of San Diego churchgoers returned to their cars after services only to encounter a sermon of another sort. "Cast your ballot for a pro-life, pro-family future," said a political flyer that had been placed on windshields. "The candidates on this slate espouse strong, traditional family values and oppose the senseless killing of innocent, unborn children for reasons of sex selection, birth control and convenience."
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Two years after approval of a far-reaching strategy to restore blue skies to the smoggy South Coast Air Basin by the year 2010, there is a growing consensus among environmentalists, business executives, government officials and air quality regulators themselves that the goal cannot be met.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|