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Southern California Population

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NEWS
March 19, 1991
Southern California's population explosion has made the region home, for the first time, to three of the nation's five largest counties, according to a Census Bureau report released Monday. Los Angeles County, with a population of more than 8.8 million, retains its 1980 rank as the nation's largest county. Holding on to second and third places are Chicago's Cook County, with 5.1 million people, and Houston's Harris County, with 2.8 million. Rounding out the top five are San Diego County with 2.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2011 | By Michael Miller, Los Angeles Times
The old church building looks forlorn at Warner Avenue and Nichols Street in Huntington Beach, its windows boarded up and the sign that juts over the sidewalk mostly smashed. From a distance, the structure doesn't give many indications of the role it once played in Orange County. Near the front door, though, a small cornerstone bears the words "Japanese Presbyterian Church A.D. 1934. " And that's the history that some in Orange County hope to save. The former Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Church — located on a 3.7-acre property along with a historic house, mission and minister's quarters — has belonged to Rainbow Disposal since 2004.
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NEWS
July 23, 1992 | SHAWN HUBLER and PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an uncharacteristically sobering economic forecast, the region's major government planning group said Wednesday that about 6 million more people--nearly enough to fill two Los Angeles-sized cities--are expected to be added to Southern California's population by 2010. Unless action is taken, officials of the Southern California Assn. of Governments warned, the growth could prove crippling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2010 | By Cara Mia DiMassa and Doug Smith
Southern California is getting its population groove back, according to new U.S. census data. All six counties showed moderate population growth from 2008 to 2009, with all but San Diego County growing at a stronger rate than the year before. It's the latest sign that the region is recovering from the declines in population seen in the middle of the decade, some experts said. "Things aren't wonderful in Southern California, but you are seeing some industries that are growing or in the process of rebounding," said Jack Kyser, senior vice president and chief economist for the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | SHAWN HUBLER and PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an uncharacteristically sobering economic forecast, the region's major government planning group said Wednesday that about 6 million more people--nearly enough to fill two Los Angeles-size cities--are expected to be added to Southern California's population by 2010. Unless action is taken, officials of the Southern California Assn. of Governments warned, the growth could prove crippling.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raising questions about how to accommodate growth, a new report forecasts that the population of a six-county Southern California region will increase about 43%--to about 22.35 million--by 2020. The population of Orange County is expected to reach 3.24 million during the period, an increase of 25%. A continuing strong birth rate in the region, particularly among Latinos, will be the main cause of the growth, forecasters said.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The population of young people in Southern California grew by more than 20% during the 1990s, double the pace of the region's adult population, census data show. The Southern California numbers are a dramatic version of trends across the state. Overall, California's youth population grew by 10% while the adult population grew by 8%. The census numbers put an exclamation point on trends that children's advocates have watched with growing concern.
NEWS
September 1, 1989 | ALAN CITRON, Times Staff Writer
On a wind-swept bluff overlooking the San Pedro coastline, a shallow trench covered with weeds marks the spot where World War II infantrymen once guarded against a Japanese invasion. The trench stands as a memorial to the war's profound impact on the Southland for historians such as Donald Young, who oversees the site as curator of the Ft. MacArthur Military Museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's ongoing census count deserves accolades, especially for its improved outreach to minorities and immigrants, community leaders and local government officials told a federal watchdog panel Monday. In 1990, the state had the largest population undercount in the nation, and a third of the Californians missed--close to 300,000--lived in the Los Angeles area, said Lt. Gov. Cruz M. Bustamante, the newest member of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2000 | From Staff and Wire Service Reports
A Census Bureau review of 15 local offices cited by the head of a congressional oversight committee for a possible recount has ended without finding any anomalies, the bureau's director announced Friday. Santa Ana, East Los Angeles and Commerce were among the offices that Rep. Dan. Miller (R-Fla.) suspected of possible fraud because of how quickly they completed their work. The areas have large minority and immigrant communities, which traditionally have been difficult to count.
MAGAZINE
May 4, 2003 | Preston Lerner, Preston Lerner last wrote for the magazine about how film and television are setting design trends.
appening upon Amy and Brad Henderson's resplendently untamed front yard amid the working-class conformity of Lawndale is as startling as stumbling across a McDonald's in the middle of a jungle. Or maybe that should be a jungle in the middle of a McDonald's. There's no meticulously maintained rectangle of lawn in this dale, no border of fastidiously trimmed shrubs, no planters full of cheerful flowers and precious ornaments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and ERIN TEXEIRA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Almost two dozen stable, ethnically balanced cities emerged in Southern California over the last decade, upending the notion that swift racial turnover inevitably follows when whites start to leave a region. The proportion of Southland cities where two or more ethnic or racial groups live in substantial numbers almost doubled between 1980 and 2000. In 1980 about a fifth of Southland cities (33 of 149) fit in that category.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The numbers that flowed from Census 2000 last week were breathtaking in their description of how Latinos and Asians had displaced whites and African Americans in Southern California. But put the five-county region under a microscope and narrow your focus. Go below the county level, below the city level, down to the census-tract level, where a few thousand people live, where change was experienced subtly, slowly, sometimes imperceptibly, over 3,652 days.
NEWS
March 30, 2001
The numbers in these stories come from the first release of California data from the 2000 census. The release, which will be used to redraw legislative district lines, covers population down to the block level, voting-age population and information on race and Latino origin. Later this year and into 2002, the Census Bureau will release additional information analyzing population by age, gender, and economic and social statistics.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California's long-predicted new ethnic order became reality in the 1990s, as Latinos ascended to dominance in Los Angeles and nonwhites came to outnumber whites regionwide by more than 3 million, census data released Thursday showed. As the millennium dawned, the combined population of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Riverside counties hit 16,373,645--surpassing the statewide total in 1960 and topping all other states in 2000 except Texas and New York.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The population of young people in Southern California grew by more than 20% during the 1990s, double the pace of the region's adult population, census data show. The Southern California numbers are a dramatic version of trends across the state. Overall, California's youth population grew by 10% while the adult population grew by 8%. The census numbers put an exclamation point on trends that children's advocates have watched with growing concern.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1995 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bolstered by an anticipated economic revival, the Los Angeles area will grow by 2.3 million residents over the next decade, the largest numerical gain of any metropolitan area in the nation, according to the study scheduled to be released today by the Palo Alto-based Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy. The population of the area--which includes Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties--will grow 14.6% to about 18.
NEWS
March 10, 1991 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Explosive population growth in Southern California could give Latinos a potential voting majority in four new congressional districts, three in the state Senate and seven in the state Assembly, representatives of Latino organizations told a legislative committee Saturday. Asian-Pacific American groups also argued for a bigger role in California government on the basis of a 119% increase in population in Los Angeles County during the 1980s, to 955,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Not again, Southern California leaders groaned Friday as they absorbed the Census Bureau's recommendation against adjusting its 2000 head count upward to factor in more than 3 million overlooked Americans. As it did in the 1990s, the region may lose billions of dollars in federal funds if Congress and the Bush administration accept the recommendation and extend it beyond the realm of election redistricting.
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