Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouthern California Research Institute
IN THE NEWS

Southern California Research Institute

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 27, 1997 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The physician owner and two employees of a Whittier pharmaceutical-research laboratory have agreed to plead guilty to charges that they conspired to falsify test results used by the Food and Drug Administration to determine the safety and effectiveness of new drugs, U.S. Atty. Nora M. Manella said Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 27, 1997 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The physician owner and two employees of a Whittier pharmaceutical-research laboratory have agreed to plead guilty to charges that they conspired to falsify test results used by the Food and Drug Administration to determine the safety and effectiveness of new drugs, U.S. Atty. Nora M. Manella said Friday.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1998 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of a Whittier Research Company was sentenced to 15 months in federal prison Tuesday for falsifying results of human drug tests submitted to the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Robert A. Fiddes, 53, of Palos Verdes, pleaded guilty to a charge of making false statements to the FDA about drugs being considered for approval. Two employees at Fiddes' Southern California Research Institute are scheduled to be sentenced on similar charges today by U.S. District Judge Robert M. Takasugi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2012 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Herbert Moskowitz, an experimental psychologist whose pioneering research on the effects of alcohol and drugs on driving helped produce standardized field sobriety tests and pushed policymakers to set lower legal limits for intoxicated driving in the U.S. and elsewhere, has died. He was 87. A former professor at UCLA and Cal State L.A., Moskowitz died Nov. 21 at his home in Encino of complications from leukemia, his son, Ivan, said. With a background in physics as well as psychology, Moskowitz devised rigorous experiments, including the early use of driving simulators, that demonstrated drivers' growing impairment as they consumed increasing amounts of alcohol.
NEWS
June 17, 1991 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a drug that has been blamed for stimulating the most abhorrent, mindless acts of violence. Users are reported to have blithely amputated parts of their body--pulling their teeth out with pliers or gouging out their eyes. Mothers were accused of scalding or maiming their infants. And felons are said to have terrified police officers when gunfire failed to halt their advance or when, in a superhuman show of strength, they popped their handcuffs.
NEWS
January 24, 1988 | KIMBERLY M. SHEARIN, Associated Press
A drunk-driving test introduced by the federal government four years ago is being applauded by police from Southern California to Rhode Island, although a few officers have difficulty accepting its simplicity. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, after 11 years of research, recommended the nystagmus gaze test as one of three drunk-driving tests to law enforcement agencies throughout the country. It is deceptively uncomplicated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1997 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president and two employees of a Whittier research company have agreed to plead guilty to conspiracy charges stemming from their falsification of test results used to evaluate drugs for the federal Food and Drug Administration, federal prosecutors said Friday. The Southern California Research Institute, also known as American Pharmaceutical Research Inc., had been hired by some major pharmaceutical manufacturers to test more than 80 drugs on human subjects, according to Assistant U.S. Atty.
NEWS
October 1, 1998 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Citations for driving under the influence don't always involve alcohol or illicit drugs. Under the California Vehicle Code, driving under the influence of a drug can also include over-the-counter or prescription medication, even something as seemingly harmless as cold medicine, if it impairs your ability to drive. "The California Vehicle Code does not distinguish between illicit and other drugs," says Sgt. Thomas Page of the Los Angeles Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1985 | BORIS YARO, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Police Sgt. Richard Studdard remembers how angry he was in 1971 when the doctor in a local hospital emergency room declined to offer an opinion on whether the handcuffed driver Studdard brought in was under the influence of some drug. The breath analysis machine had failed to register any alcohol, but motorcycle Officer Studdard knew the man was high on something. He was, after all, sliding off the chair to the floor.
NATIONAL
December 30, 2002 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
A high-pressure federal effort to toughen drunk driving laws across the nation is meeting resistance in a third of the states, where many politicians say the policy is counterproductive and misguided. Highway safety regulators in 1998 called on states to lower the allowable blood-alcohol level for drivers to 0.08%, or risk losing millions of dollars in federal highway grants.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|