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Southern California Social Survey

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NEWS
March 31, 1989 | LOIS TIMNICK, Times Staff Writer
Half of Southern California women would consider having children without a husband or a live-in partner if they were childless and approaching the end of child-bearing age, a UCLA social survey has found. Only 10% of childless respondents said they do not want children, with the majority citing lack of money and time as the main reasons they have postponed pregnancy.
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NEWS
March 31, 1989 | LOIS TIMNICK, Times Staff Writer
Half of Southern California women would consider having children without a husband or a live-in partner if they were childless and approaching the end of child-bearing age, a UCLA social survey has found. Only 10% of childless respondents said they do not want children, with the majority citing lack of money and time as the main reasons they have postponed pregnancy.
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BUSINESS
January 6, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
Southern Californians are ambivalent about the future of the economy here, despite a robust national economic expansion and moderate inflation, according to a recent survey by the Institute for Social Science Research at the University of California, Los Angeles. The survey is the first in what is planned to be an annual opinion sampling on a wide variety of economic and social issues in Southern California, according to John R. Petrocik, the institute's associate director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Residents of the Los Angeles metropolitan area consider AIDS a major threat to society at large and fear they are due to become victims of crime, but most nonetheless hold a basic optimism about their lot in life, according to a new poll released Wednesday by UCLA. At the same time, more than a third said they have less confidence in Washington's ability to solve problems than five years ago and consider many government officials to be "crooked."
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
He was a Jewish/Unitarian minister hitchhiking at the corner of Venice and Sepulveda. And he had no idea the woman who picked him up had long sought to be what she considered a "politically correct" single mom. Before meeting him, she had even placed an ad for a man to father her child in the liberal Mother Jones magazine, figuring "men of the political left were more open to alternate forms of parenting." But years later, after failing to woo a set of desirable genes with her classified come-on, L.A. Weekly Health Editor Carolyn Reuben had given up classified ads for serendipity.
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