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Southern California Tourism

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BUSINESS
December 6, 1997 | YUNG KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the threat posed by economic turmoil in Asia, Southern California tourism officials on Friday expressed cautious optimism about the industry's prospects for 1998. The number of Asians visiting Southern California leaped 21% last year to 2.4 million, out of a total of 45 million visitors. That number could drop significantly as a result of economic turmoil in Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia. "It will be expensive for the people of those countries to travel to the U.S.
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OPINION
July 28, 2006 | D.J. Waldie, D.J. WALDIE is the author of "Where We Are Now: Notes from Los Angeles."
This is one in an occasional series of summertime essays. Summer came late to Southern California. Starting in the 1870s, it was a season specifically for outdoor leisure in the East, where the well-to-do fled to cool Adirondack lodges and the sweating urban masses subwayed to beach playgrounds such as Coney Island. But Southern California was solely a winter destination, an October to April place where the old or the tubercular could retreat from the damp and the cold.
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OPINION
July 28, 2006 | D.J. Waldie, D.J. WALDIE is the author of "Where We Are Now: Notes from Los Angeles."
This is one in an occasional series of summertime essays. Summer came late to Southern California. Starting in the 1870s, it was a season specifically for outdoor leisure in the East, where the well-to-do fled to cool Adirondack lodges and the sweating urban masses subwayed to beach playgrounds such as Coney Island. But Southern California was solely a winter destination, an October to April place where the old or the tubercular could retreat from the damp and the cold.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1997 | YUNG KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the threat posed by economic turmoil in Asia, Southern California tourism officials on Friday expressed cautious optimism about the industry's prospects for 1998. The number of Asians visiting Southern California leaped 21% last year to 2.4 million, out of a total of 45 million visitors. That number could drop significantly as a result of economic turmoil in Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia. "It will be expensive for the people of those countries to travel to the U.S.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1988 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
The holidays are coming to the Southland's theme parks--and some people are going to be sick. For the first time, three tourist attractions--Magic Mountain, Universal Studios and Disneyland--are opening major new rides in the middle of winter. All three will offer enough dips and dives to thrill and chill even the most ho-hum patron. But while some customers may end up queasy, industry insiders expect that profits will be healthy indeed.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all accounts, the tourism industry in the Southern end of the state enjoyed a stellar year in 1996. With no natural or man-made disasters to deter them, visitors streamed into the region and spent freely. Disneyland and Universal Studios Hollywood boasted record attendance. Hotel occupancy was more than healthy. Conventions were booked in unheard-of volumes, particularly in Los Angeles. And 1997 will be a strong year as well, industry observers say, although maybe not as strong as 1996.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1992 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks now, Tony Everfield has been planning a June vacation with his three children to Disneyland. But after watching two nights of rioting across Los Angeles on the television, Everfield was racked Friday by second thoughts. "I don't want my kids involved in seeing the violence," said the Oakland chef. "Los Angeles was a beautiful city. It just looks awful from what I've seen on the news. It will frighten the hell out of you.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1998 | STEPHEN GREGORY
Tourism: Southern California tourism next year is expected to surpass this year's record showing, given projected growth in conventioneers and foreign visitors, even from financially troubled Asia. More than 23.8 million visitors are expected next year, up 2% from this year. Leisure travel from Britain and Germany is expected to be up strongly. Japanese tourism is also projected to grow by 3%, after a 5% dip this year.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1987 | MARY ANN GALANTE
Disneyland is more popular than ever. Anaheim's Magic Kingdom will soon announce record attendance of almost 13 million visitors during the fiscal year ended Sept. 30, sources said this week. That compares to about 12 million in each of the two previous years. Although the park has not yet released turnstile numbers, sources confirmed Tuesday that Disneyland will report in several weeks that attendance approached 13 million in fiscal 1987.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1999 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Southern California's tourism industry, a key pillar of the local economy, is expected to see its eighth straight year of steady growth as a strong national economy and improving economies abroad keep sending visitors to the region, according to a new industry report. The continued stream of tourists will push occupancy at Los Angeles County hotels to 76% in 2000 and allow hotel operators to charge, on average, an additional $5 per night over this year's rates.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1997 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By all accounts, the tourism industry in the Southern end of the state enjoyed a stellar year in 1996. With no natural or man-made disasters to deter them, visitors streamed into the region and spent freely. Disneyland and Universal Studios Hollywood boasted record attendance. Hotel occupancy was more than healthy. Conventions were booked in unheard-of volumes, particularly in Los Angeles. And 1997 will be a strong year as well, industry observers say, although maybe not as strong as 1996.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1988 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
The holidays are coming to the Southland's theme parks--and some people are going to be sick. For the first time, three tourist attractions--Magic Mountain, Universal Studios and Disneyland--are opening major new rides in the middle of winter. All three will offer enough dips and dives to thrill and chill even the most ho-hum patron. But while some customers may end up queasy, industry insiders expect that profits will be healthy indeed.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
A bright spot in the local economy - tourism - continues to generate big numbers for Los Angeles County's hotels, restaurants and other hospitality businesses. Tourists spent $16.4 billion in 2012, most of it on lodging, food and drinks, according to a study commissioned by the Los Angeles Tourism & Convention Board. By comparison, the group said, tourists spent $15.4 billion in 2011. Tourism last year also generated more than $2 billion in state and local taxes, according to the study by Los Angeles economics research firm Micronomics.
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