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Southern California Trade

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BUSINESS
May 3, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the heels of exceptionally strong growth last year, Southern California trade will slow dramatically in the coming months due to a sluggish global economy, a strong dollar and political turmoil in Asia, according to a report being released today. Two-way trade through the state's leading gateway--the five-county Los Angeles Customs District--will expand by a modest 2.8% to $236.5 billion in 2001, down from last year's 16.7% expansion, predicts the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp.'
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OPINION
November 29, 2007
There are long nets slung under the Gerald Desmond Bridge at the Port of Long Beach to catch the chunks of concrete that periodically fall off the crumbling 1968 span, which is built too low to the water to allow the new generation of giant container ships to pass beneath.
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BUSINESS
January 14, 2000 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Southern California's trade-related businesses handled an unprecedented flood of overseas goods last year, as the nation's busiest ports at Long Beach and Los Angeles took in record cargo volume. The onslaught aided growth at local distribution facilities, transportation companies, freight-forwarding concerns and other trade-sector businesses in the region. Many companies had to scramble to find workers to keep up with an unrelenting flow of cargo. "Yes, we had a good year.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2001 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the heels of exceptionally strong growth last year, Southern California trade will slow dramatically in the coming months due to a sluggish global economy, a strong dollar and political turmoil in Asia, according to a report being released today. Two-way trade through the state's leading gateway--the five-county Los Angeles Customs District--will expand by a modest 2.8% to $236.5 billion in 2001, down from last year's 16.7% expansion, predicts the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp.'
BUSINESS
August 3, 1992 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exports were supposed to be an engine that would help drive the U.S. economy out of recession. Since February, however, U.S. export growth has slumped as major trading partners--particularly Japan and Europe--have been plagued by weakening economies. But in Southern California, export growth has remained relatively strong, providing a rare gleam in the local economic gloom and helping to offset poor domestic sales. Take the example of Stonefish Inc.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Asia's financial crisis will slow Southern California's dynamic international business sector, with two-way trade projected to expand a mere 2.3% this year to $190 billion, according to a forecast released Friday by the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. That is a sharp slowdown from last year, when trade through the Los Angeles Customs District jumped 9.3% over the previous year. This year's moderate growth will come entirely from imports, which are expected to expand 8.5% to $121.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an unlikely diplomatic setting. Instead of international talks in the elegant mansions of Embassy Row, there was talk of oranges and aerospace firms in the meeting rooms of the Los Angeles Convention Center--one floor above an auto show. Several dozen ambassadors had flown from Washington to attend and, certainly, diplomatic skills were in order. They were there to woo and be wooed, negotiating--along with their Southern California hosts--a fine line of commercial self-interest.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every time the economy hits the skids, cobbler James Hedge sees more customers walk into his small Ventura shop asking for repairs of old, worn shoes that would be thrown away in more confident times. "There's a regular flow of people now," said Hedge, co-owner of Paramount Shoe Repair. Judging by more conventional standards, economist Stephen Levy thinks that Southern California and the whole state are very close to a recession.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exports account for more than 850,000 jobs in the five-county Los Angeles region, far more than previously assumed, a new study disclosed Thursday. An estimated 14% of the total employment in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties is directly or indirectly related to export manufacturing and services, well above the 10% share that has been the standard rule of thumb, according to the Cal State Long Beach study.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
It's being called the most important development of the next two decades for Southern California's economy. It promises to create 700,000 jobs and to generate billions of dollars in business development. Yet most people, if they've heard of it at all, are vague on just what the Alameda Corridor is.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2001 | Evelyn Iritani
The Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. and the World Trade Center Assn. of Los Angeles-Long Beach have joined forces to promote the region's international ties. As of April 1, the WTCA will become a subsidiary of the development corporation. The merged organization will provide a one-stop shop for business assistance and international trade services.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2000 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Southern California's trade-related businesses handled an unprecedented flood of overseas goods last year, as the nation's busiest ports at Long Beach and Los Angeles took in record cargo volume. The onslaught aided growth at local distribution facilities, transportation companies, freight-forwarding concerns and other trade-sector businesses in the region. Many companies had to scramble to find workers to keep up with an unrelenting flow of cargo. "Yes, we had a good year.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Asia's financial crisis will slow Southern California's dynamic international business sector, with two-way trade projected to expand a mere 2.3% this year to $190 billion, according to a forecast released Friday by the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp. That is a sharp slowdown from last year, when trade through the Los Angeles Customs District jumped 9.3% over the previous year. This year's moderate growth will come entirely from imports, which are expected to expand 8.5% to $121.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exports account for more than 850,000 jobs in the five-county Los Angeles region, far more than previously assumed, a new study disclosed Thursday. An estimated 14% of the total employment in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties is directly or indirectly related to export manufacturing and services, well above the 10% share that has been the standard rule of thumb, according to the Cal State Long Beach study.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
It's being called the most important development of the next two decades for Southern California's economy. It promises to create 700,000 jobs and to generate billions of dollars in business development. Yet most people, if they've heard of it at all, are vague on just what the Alameda Corridor is.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an unlikely diplomatic setting. Instead of international talks in the elegant mansions of Embassy Row, there was talk of oranges and aerospace firms in the meeting rooms of the Los Angeles Convention Center--one floor above an auto show. Several dozen ambassadors had flown from Washington to attend and, certainly, diplomatic skills were in order. They were there to woo and be wooed, negotiating--along with their Southern California hosts--a fine line of commercial self-interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1989 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One Monday in October, Greg Smith arrived at work to find his Freddie Krueger dolls missing--all 3,700 of them. The dolls--$92,000 worth of stuffed likenesses of the gruesome "Nightmare on Elm Street" film character--had come from Taiwan, via the Port of Long Beach. Like much of the merchandise imported today, they were packed in a cargo shipping container. Upon its arrival, the container was loaded by crane onto a trailer.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1993 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam in the 1990s is gradually emerging from a "twilight zone" where things aren't always the way they are supposed to be, says Pham Chi Lan, secretary general of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Vietnam. Addressing a gathering of Southern California business people last week--a day after the United States eased its trade embargo on Lan's country--she acknowledged that economic reforms started in the last decade have been stymied by vestiges of the old system of central planning.
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