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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1985
Water Committee Election: Orange County Supervisor Harriett Wieder was reelected chairwoman of the Southern California Water Committee at the committee's annual meeting last week in Los Angeles. Supervisor John Flyn of Ventura County was elected vice chairman. After her reelection to her second term as president, Wieder said she feels the coming year "promises to be a very productive and exciting chapter in the SCWC's development."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1994
Re "Landmark Accord Reached on Use of Bay-Delta Water," Dec. 16: The historic agreement reached by Gov. Pete Wilson and senior members of the Clinton Administration brings to an end the interminable squabbling that has stalemated reasonable water supply planning, development and use. The uncertainty of our water future, which has threatened California's economic recovery, is resolved--at least temporarily. The Southern California Water Committee applauds this pact to protect the delta and provide reliable water supplies to cities, farms and the environment; however, we must not lose sight of the need to extend the agreement and to construct badly needed water supply facilities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1988
On behalf of the Southern California Water Committee, I would like to thank The Times for covering the critical water issue. However, the overall tone of the article could lead Southern Californians into a false sense of security. The article allays fears of an imminent water shortage in our Southland and instead refers to the drought conditions in Northern California. It is crucial for us to realize the direct effects their cutbacks will have on us. "Without water there is no Southern California."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1992
In response to "California Is Getting Closer to a True Water Breakthrough," editorial, May 26: The Miller and Seymour bills both propose landmark water legislation formulas for Californians, but we're not being weaned from a 3,000-mile umbilical water cord to Washington The federal government is not directly responsible for providing intrastate facilities to transport water and we cannot ignore the critical role that facilities play in...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1986
Thank you for The Times' coverage of the Southern California Water Committee in Jeff Perlman's article, "Wieder's Water Committee Looks for Wellspring of Public Support" (April 7). However, I would like to have seen a more balanced treatment of the serious underlying issues concerning water and the committee's goals, objectives and activities. Southern California is highly dependent on water imported from other areas even in wet years. And we have already begun to lose supplies from one of Southern California's three critical imported sources as Arizona siphons off court-sanctioned entitlements from the Colorado River Aqueduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER
Ventura County Supervisor John K. Flynn has been honored for his work to create a water conservation coalition between Northern and Southern California. Two statewide conservation groups, the Environmental Water Leadership Council and the Local Government Commission, presented Flynn with an award on the opening evening of a three-day water conference over the weekend at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1986
Orange County Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder was reappointed chairwoman of the Southern California Water Committee during the organization's annual meeting. SCWC, a coalition of government, business and agricultural interests from eight Southern and central California counties founded in 1983, also approved a 1987 budget of more than $300,000 for educational and conservation programs at its annual meeting last week, committee officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1992
In response to "California Is Getting Closer to a True Water Breakthrough," editorial, May 26: The Miller and Seymour bills both propose landmark water legislation formulas for Californians, but we're not being weaned from a 3,000-mile umbilical water cord to Washington The federal government is not directly responsible for providing intrastate facilities to transport water and we cannot ignore the critical role that facilities play in...
OPINION
February 10, 1991
Your editorial "The Growing Need for Deeper Involvement" (Jan. 28) is right on target in pointing out the consequences of an unreliable water supply for the Southern California business community. This unstable resource, coupled with the lack of affordable housing, environmental restrictions, an untrained work force and a recession-bound economy, are beginning to weigh heavily on the minds and pocketbooks of local business leaders. But their concern is not enough. The business community must begin to realize that its very survival may depend on its involvement in these tough issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1985
I have learned that before most major problems can begin to be solved, you have to attract peoples' attention. Your editorial (Nov. 4), "Politics and Water," helped the Southern California Water Committee accomplish this. Thank you. Your editorial, however, seriously misconstrued my position. Let me state it. The Peripheral Canal is wrong plumbing; it always has been. Its construction would seriously impair water quality in the San Joaquin Delta. Furthermore, its clear that a significant majority of California's citizens won't support it. The establishment of a workable and effective water policy is necessary before any specific project is either proposed or built.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER
Ventura County Supervisor John K. Flynn has been honored for his work to create a water conservation coalition between Northern and Southern California. Two statewide conservation groups, the Environmental Water Leadership Council and the Local Government Commission, presented Flynn with an award on the opening evening of a three-day water conference over the weekend at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles.
OPINION
February 10, 1991
Your editorial "The Growing Need for Deeper Involvement" (Jan. 28) is right on target in pointing out the consequences of an unreliable water supply for the Southern California business community. This unstable resource, coupled with the lack of affordable housing, environmental restrictions, an untrained work force and a recession-bound economy, are beginning to weigh heavily on the minds and pocketbooks of local business leaders. But their concern is not enough. The business community must begin to realize that its very survival may depend on its involvement in these tough issues.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | From United Press International
Two committees formed to study water policy issues--one in the San Francisco Bay Area and one in Southern California--said Thursday that they have joined forces to seek an end to California's water wars. The groups are the Southern California Water Committee, chaired by Ventura County Supervisor John Flynn, and the Bay Area's Committee for Water Policy Consensus, headed by Contra Costa County Supervisor Sunne McPeak.
NEWS
October 22, 1988 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
The chances are only 1 in 10 that California's water shortage will extend into a third consecutive dry year, state experts said Friday at a symposium on the prospects for further drought. The projection was made by the state Department of Water Resources as part of its "Drought Contingency Planning Guidelines for 1989." A preliminary draft of the plan was shown to Southern California water agencies Friday in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1988
On behalf of the Southern California Water Committee, I would like to thank The Times for covering the critical water issue. However, the overall tone of the article could lead Southern Californians into a false sense of security. The article allays fears of an imminent water shortage in our Southland and instead refers to the drought conditions in Northern California. It is crucial for us to realize the direct effects their cutbacks will have on us. "Without water there is no Southern California."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1986
Orange County Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder was reappointed chairwoman of the Southern California Water Committee during the organization's annual meeting. SCWC, a coalition of government, business and agricultural interests from eight Southern and central California counties founded in 1983, also approved a 1987 budget of more than $300,000 for educational and conservation programs at its annual meeting last week, committee officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1994
Re "Landmark Accord Reached on Use of Bay-Delta Water," Dec. 16: The historic agreement reached by Gov. Pete Wilson and senior members of the Clinton Administration brings to an end the interminable squabbling that has stalemated reasonable water supply planning, development and use. The uncertainty of our water future, which has threatened California's economic recovery, is resolved--at least temporarily. The Southern California Water Committee applauds this pact to protect the delta and provide reliable water supplies to cities, farms and the environment; however, we must not lose sight of the need to extend the agreement and to construct badly needed water supply facilities.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | From United Press International
Two committees formed to study water policy issues--one in the San Francisco Bay Area and one in Southern California--said Thursday that they have joined forces to seek an end to California's water wars. The groups are the Southern California Water Committee, chaired by Ventura County Supervisor John Flynn, and the Bay Area's Committee for Water Policy Consensus, headed by Contra Costa County Supervisor Sunne McPeak.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1986
Thank you for The Times' coverage of the Southern California Water Committee in Jeff Perlman's article, "Wieder's Water Committee Looks for Wellspring of Public Support" (April 7). However, I would like to have seen a more balanced treatment of the serious underlying issues concerning water and the committee's goals, objectives and activities. Southern California is highly dependent on water imported from other areas even in wet years. And we have already begun to lose supplies from one of Southern California's three critical imported sources as Arizona siphons off court-sanctioned entitlements from the Colorado River Aqueduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1986
Wallace Stegner, a fine author, has written a mournful article (Opinion, Dec. 29), "Water in the West: Growing Beyond Nature's Limits," on the despoliation of the West. He would have the arid areas remain arid for spiritual and artistic purposes. His underlying premise is that what nature wrought man should not change. This is certainly an attractive thesis until we consider the remainder of the equation--the abode and sustenance of man. How development proceeds today depends on a myriad of decisions by public agencies, businesses, and individuals.
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