Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouthern California
IN THE NEWS

Southern California

SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
Climate change and extreme weather could set back decades of improvement in California's air quality, a new report by the state's pollution control officers says. A higher number of extreme heat days from global warming will boost smog formation and increase severe wildfires that release harmful smoke into the air, according to an annual report released Wednesday by the California Air Pollution Control Officers' Assn. "The achievements we've made to date could be put in peril,” said Jack Broadbent, air pollution control officer for the San Francisco Bay Area and president of the association, which represents the 35 air districts throughout the state.
Advertisement
SPORTS
April 22, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
When it comes to best senior receiver in Southern California this fall, the college football recruiters are saying that Equanimeous St. Brown of Anaheim Servite is No. 1. UCLA is the latest to offer the 6-foot-5 St. Brown, joining USC, Notre Dame, Arizona State, Colorado, Stanford and Tennessee, among others. St. Brown caught 42 passes for 725 yards and six touchdowns as a junior. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Andrew Khouri
New California foreclosure starts rose in the first quarter, although they remain at pre-bust levels. Default notices -- the first step in the state's foreclosure process -- jumped 6% from the previous quarter to 19,215, research firm DataQuick said Tuesday. New foreclosure filings rose 3.5% from the first quarter of 2013. DataQuick analyst John Karevoll said the rise from the fourth quarter, the lowest level since 2005, probably came from lenders working through their delinquent loan pipelines and not from more financial distress.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
Southern California's office market has improved ever so slightly - once again for landlords. In the just-finished first quarter of 2014, the overall vacancy rate fell less than a percentage point and monthly rents ticked up a nickel per square foot. The slight upward shift in occupancy was typical of the last several quarters. The region's office rental market stabilized after the recession, but has not picked up steam the way it did during previous economic recoveries. Nevertheless, vacancy is reaching its lowest level since 2008, when the Great Recession hit and prompted a downward trend in office use that finally is turning around, albeit at a glacial pace.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - A longtime board member of the country's largest public pension fund is in trouble again with California's political watchdog. Priya Mathur, board vice president of the $288-billion California Public Employees' Retirement System, has a penchant for not filing timely reports to the Fair Political Practices Commission. And she failed again for 2012 and 2013. Since she was first elected in 2002, Mathur, a financial analyst for the Bay Area Rapid Transit District, has been fined $13,000 for five reporting violations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
Steelhead trout once packed the natural pools of Southern California's spawning rivers - that is, until the waterways were transformed into concrete drainage canals in the 1930s to protect the burgeoning flatlands from flooding. The last steelhead in the Los Angeles River was a 25-incher caught off a bridge in Glendale in 1940, two years after that stretch was paved. Today, the region's steelhead population hovers around 500 - 10% of what it was seven decades ago. "The good news is that steelhead are remarkably resilient if given half a chance," Jerry Schubel, president and chief executive of the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, said last week as crews were installing plumbing and temperature controls in an exhibit he said was designed to "reveal some of the secrets of this fish and inspire conservation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
A man authorities dubbed the “family annihilator” for allegedly bludgeoning his mother, wife and three sons to death with a hammer nearly 40 years ago may be living in Southern California, FBI officials said. William Bradford Bishop Jr., 77, hasn't been seen since the day after authorities say he killed his family in Maryland in March 1976. After driving to rural North Carolina, where he allegedly burned and buried the bodies, Bishop bought a pair of sneakers in Jacksonville, N.C., and disappeared, the FBI said in a news release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
Authorities say the killing on March 1, 1976, began after William Bradford Bishop Jr. learned he'd been passed over for a promotion at the State Department earlier in the day. Bishop had been receiving psychiatric care for depression and suffered from insomnia when, the FBI alleges, he took a hammer to his wife, mother and kids at their home in Bethesda, Md. His wife, Annette; his 68-year-old mother, Lobelia; and three sons - William Bradford III,...
FOOD
April 18, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
There's no way around it. In most cases, eating sustainably is probably going to be more expensive and less convenient than simply running down the street to your neighborhood grocery. But if you're interested in where your food comes from and how it gets from the field to your kitchen, here are some Southern California organizations that are making it easier to cook responsibly. Community Seafood: Though Southern California no longer has the thriving commercial fishing community it once did, three women, Sarah Rathbone, Kim Selkoe and Courtney Dietz, are working to connect 40 to 50 of the remaining local fishermen with home cooks in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Despite the migration of film production from Southern California, the Los Angeles region saw double-digit percentage gains in feature-film production in the first three months of this year. Feature films generated 1,588 production days in the first quarter, a 24% increase over the same period last year, according to figures released Tuesday by FilmL.A. Inc., the nonprofit group that handles film permits for the city and county. The category outperformed its five-year quarterly average by nearly 40%, although the figures were still well below peak levels in the late 1990s.  Additionally, the films were mostly lower-budget projects, those with  budgets of under $75 million.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|