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Southern Christian Leadership Conference

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NATIONAL
March 25, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
Richard Jackson was walking past the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's handsome $3-million headquarters this month, just blocks from the grave of its first president, Martin Luther King Jr. Jackson, an aspiring rap producer, hadn't heard about the outbreak of scandal and infighting rocking the storied civil rights group. But the 32-year-old also confessed, a little sheepishly, that he had trouble recalling their story at all: "Who are they, exactly?" he said. Such is the plight of the modern-day SCLC.
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OPINION
February 11, 2014 | By Betty DeRamus
Black History Month reminds me of a really great golden oldies station, always blaring the same handful of terrific tunes. Every February, it plays Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks and Harriet Tubman soul - with a chorus or two of the George Washington Carver blues. Now don't get me wrong. This is my kind of history, and my kind of heroes, and I understand why we must tell every generation their stories. I just think that including some fresh tales too would produce a far fuller picture of how blacks enriched America.
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NEWS
July 26, 1998 | From Associated Press
Forty-one years after his father co-founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Martin Luther King III was sworn in as its new leader and announced a membership drive to revitalize the image of the financially ailing organization. King, 40, replaced the Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, whose 20-year reign was troubled by questions about the group's mission and difficulty in raising funds.
NATIONAL
June 9, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
Asked once to sum up what it means to be a Christian, the Rev. Will D. Campbell said: "We are all bastards, but God loves us anyway. " That belief compelled his unusual life as a Southern Baptist minister who rejected organized religion, played a prominent role in central events of the civil rights movement and ministered to a broad range of humanity -- including country music stars like Waylon Jennings and members of the Ku Klux Klan -- from his...
NATIONAL
August 6, 2007 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
Three years ago, when Charles Steele Jr. became president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, he worked out of a cramped headquarters without power or light. The embattled civil rights group's funds were scant, and so, too, was it's sense of mission. Its fortunes have since changed, and the organization that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. co-founded is marking its 50th anniversary today with the opening of a $3-million international headquarters here.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announced it has joined the boycott of Colorado over a new state measure that prohibits enactment of anti-bias legislation protecting homosexuals. SCLC President Joseph E. Lowery said the civil rights organization endorsed the boycott because "we think it's just un-American to single out a class of people to deny them their civil rights."
NEWS
July 29, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, considered the dean of the civil rights movement, is resigning as leader of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the organization he co-founded with the Revs. Martin Luther King Jr., Ralph Abernathy Sr. and other clergymen. Inheriting a group in turmoil and in debt 20 years ago, Lowery, 74, guided it on a new course that embraced more mainstream social and economic polices and restored its financial health.
NEWS
April 6, 1988
Marchers in a cross-country pilgrimage for the poor stepped off from the small Memphis, Tenn., motel where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. died 20 years ago. "We're trying to stir up the countryside. We're trying to bring people out to express their outrage about poverty," said the Rev. Joseph Lowery, president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, a civil rights organization founded by King.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Rev. Simmie Lee Harvey, 90, a civil rights stalwart who worked alongside the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and helped plan the march on Washington in 1963, died Sept. 10 in New Orleans of complications from a stroke, according to Rhodes Funeral Home. He had been hospitalized for about two weeks. Harvey was a co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which was created in 1957 to advance racial equality. The Washington march he helped plan culminated in King's "I Have a Dream" speech.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. Will D. Campbell was a poor white boy from Mississippi who preached his first sermon from a pulpit stocked with a Bible from the Ku Klux Klan. But this son of the segregated South - a self-avowed "good ol' boy with crazy ideas" - did not follow the conventional career path for a Southern Baptist minister in the 1950s. He became the only white man admitted to the founding meeting of the seminal Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957. That same year, when nine black students attempted to integrate Central High School in Little Rock, Ark., he was one of three white ministers who guided them past a fierce white mob. Later, when civil rights workers targeted Nashville lunch counters, he rounded up sympathetic whites to nudge the business owners toward integration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2011 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
The Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth, a blunt-talking preacher who braved beatings, bombings and fire-hosings to push Birmingham, Ala., to the forefront of the civil rights movement and advanced the historic fight with a confrontational strategy that often put him at odds with its most charismatic leader, died Wednesday. He was 89. Shuttlesworth had been in poor health for the last year and was hospitalized with breathing problems three weeks ago at Birmingham's Princeton Baptist Medical Center, where he died, said family spokeswoman Malena Cunningham.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
Richard Jackson was walking past the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's handsome $3-million headquarters this month, just blocks from the grave of its first president, Martin Luther King Jr. Jackson, an aspiring rap producer, hadn't heard about the outbreak of scandal and infighting rocking the storied civil rights group. But the 32-year-old also confessed, a little sheepishly, that he had trouble recalling their story at all: "Who are they, exactly?" he said. Such is the plight of the modern-day SCLC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2009 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The Southern Christian Leadership Conference, a civil rights group partly founded by Martin Luther King Jr., has threatened to fire the president of its Los Angeles chapter because he supports same-sex marriage. The Rev. Eric P. Lee, president of the local SCLC chapter for two years, became an outspoken advocate of same-sex marriage during the recent campaign against Proposition 8, an amendment to the state Constitution that banned such unions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Rev. Simmie Lee Harvey, 90, a civil rights stalwart who worked alongside the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and helped plan the march on Washington in 1963, died Sept. 10 in New Orleans of complications from a stroke, according to Rhodes Funeral Home. He had been hospitalized for about two weeks. Harvey was a co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, which was created in 1957 to advance racial equality. The Washington march he helped plan culminated in King's "I Have a Dream" speech.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2007 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
Three years ago, when Charles Steele Jr. became president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, he worked out of a cramped headquarters without power or light. The embattled civil rights group's funds were scant, and so, too, was it's sense of mission. Its fortunes have since changed, and the organization that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. co-founded is marking its 50th anniversary today with the opening of a $3-million international headquarters here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES
English and history were never Vinh Phan's favorite subjects. So when his English teacher asked the class to write an essay on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for a contest, Vinh didn't think much about it at first. "I thought it was just an assignment," said the 16-year-old, a junior at Kennedy High School in Granada Hills. But after reading about the famous civil rights leader in the library, Vinh said he began to get very inspired. "I had never really thought about him," Vinh said.
NEWS
October 27, 1997 | Associated Press
After months of speculation, Martin Luther King III has emerged as the most likely candidate to take over as the head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Several SCLC board members Sunday confirmed a report that King, the son of the group's co-founder Martin Luther King Jr., is the heir apparent. The SCLC's board of directors is expected to meet this week to vote on the appointment of the group's new leader. But the final decision will be made by SCLC delegates.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2005 | From Associated Press
The civil rights group founded by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. opened its five-day annual meeting Saturday, a year after the gathering was racked by turmoil so intense that police had to be called to keep the peace. As the Southern Christian Leadership Conference meeting began, members said they had restored the group's financial footing and planned to expand overseas in search of long-term stability. President Charles Steele Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2004 | Joy Buchanan, Times Staff Writer
More than 100,000 people are expected to line Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard this morning for the 19th annual Kingdom Day parade in honor of the slain civil rights leader. But the local chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, a national organization that King founded, will not be among scores of parade participants. "Dr. King never led a parade," said the Rev. Norman Johnson, executive director of the conference's Los Angeles chapter.
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