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NEWS
September 2, 1986 | Associated Press
Thousands of allied troops will take part in large-scale military maneuvers in southern Europe this fall, military headquarters of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization announced Monday. The "Display Determination 86" exercise, which runs from Sept. 19 through Oct. 13 in Italy and Turkey, will include troops from Italy, Turkey and the United States, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe said in a statement.
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OPINION
November 6, 2013 | By Bruce Ackerman
President Obama is slowly extricating the U.S. from its Bush-era fixation on the Middle East. But he is turning his attention in the wrong direction. Europe, not Asia, should be his main focus. The future of liberal democracy will depend on its ongoing success in its Enlightenment heartland. If it can overcome current troubles and thrive in Europe and the Americas, this will inspire the worldwide democracy movement over the long run. If it fails in the West, no amount of Asian realpolitik will compensate for the collapse.
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WORLD
May 21, 2006 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
When the Vatican looks out at the state of the Western European family, it is alarmed. It sees parents and children at the mercy of overly secular nations awash in laws and practices that liberalize evils, from abortion to gay marriage. Church officials now have another trend to fret about. Divorce has been marching ever upward everywhere in Europe, but nowhere more so than in the continent's three most Roman Catholic countries.
OPINION
September 27, 2013 | By Timothy Garton Ash
So the German people have spoken, and Chancellor Angela Merkel has been reelected. That means the European Union will continue to be a tortoise. Next May, following the European Parliament elections, we will discover just how slow and unhappy a creature it is. Then, across the next decade, a larger, Aesopian question will be posed: Can the European tortoise outrun the American eagle and the Chinese dragon? Or can it at least keep pace with them? Resounding though Mutti ("Mom") Merkel's election victory was, Germany's new government still has to be formed.
WORLD
July 28, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
It was raining, but then an English summer wouldn't be English without a shower. The sprinkle quickly became a downpour -- well, not really a downpour, people said, because these are people who have as many words for rain as Eskimos have for snow. "It was just blankets of rain," said Maggie Clutterbuck, whose daughter's restaurant in the center of town had a basement full of water within hours.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Europe's recession stretched into the first three months of the year, making it the single-currency region's longest downturn and raising concerns about its effect on the U.S. recovery. The 17-nation Eurozone economy contracted 0.2% in the first quarter compared with the previous quarter, according to data released Wednesday by Eurostat, the region's statistical office. It was the sixth straight quarter of contraction, exceeding the five-quarter recession from 2008-09.
WORLD
August 14, 2013 | By Janet Stobart, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
LONDON -- Europe's economy is showing signs of recovery for the first time since 2011, according to figures released Wednesday by the European Commission. The second quarter of 2013 showed distinct if fragile 0.3% economic growth collectively over the previous quarter for the 17 countries that share the euro currency. The improvement was driven chiefly by Germany, where gross domestic product grew by 0.7% over the previous quarter, and France, with growth of 0.5%. Consumer spending, manufacturing and exports appear to have grown in both countries.
NEWS
July 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Hundreds of wildfires burned across southern Europe, which remained in the grip of a heat wave that has driven temperatures as high as 120 degrees. The sizzling weather accompanied the worst drought to strike the Balkans in 50 years, which has already caused record crop losses since it began in late May. Ambulances patrolled the streets in southern Romanian cities to pick up people who had fainted in the 106-degree heat.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. Adm. Arthur S. Moreau Jr., commander of NATO forces in southern Europe, died Monday of a heart attack, military officials said. He was 55. Moreau, who also was commander of U.S. Naval Forces in Europe, died at a military hospital in this port city. His death was announced by a U.S. Navy spokesman in London, Capt. Gordon Peterson, and confirmed in Naples by the Allied Forces in Southern Europe.
OPINION
September 27, 2013 | By Timothy Garton Ash
So the German people have spoken, and Chancellor Angela Merkel has been reelected. That means the European Union will continue to be a tortoise. Next May, following the European Parliament elections, we will discover just how slow and unhappy a creature it is. Then, across the next decade, a larger, Aesopian question will be posed: Can the European tortoise outrun the American eagle and the Chinese dragon? Or can it at least keep pace with them? Resounding though Mutti ("Mom") Merkel's election victory was, Germany's new government still has to be formed.
WORLD
August 14, 2013 | By Janet Stobart, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
LONDON -- Europe's economy is showing signs of recovery for the first time since 2011, according to figures released Wednesday by the European Commission. The second quarter of 2013 showed distinct if fragile 0.3% economic growth collectively over the previous quarter for the 17 countries that share the euro currency. The improvement was driven chiefly by Germany, where gross domestic product grew by 0.7% over the previous quarter, and France, with growth of 0.5%. Consumer spending, manufacturing and exports appear to have grown in both countries.
OPINION
July 20, 2013 | Doyle McManus
RIMINI, Italy - You think we have it bad, caught between a stagnant economy and gridlocked politics? Then take a trip to Europe, where the economy is going not sideways but backward - and the politics are too. Europe's numbers should be familiar by now, but they're still awful. In the United States, President Obama's much-derided stimulus package helped end our recession in 2009; in Europe, with no comparable stimulus, the recession isn't over. Unemployment in the 17 countries that share the euro is higher than 11%, and it's still heading up. The International Monetary Fund says the Eurozone's economies won't start growing again until next year, if then.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Europe's recession stretched into the first three months of the year, making it the single-currency region's longest downturn and raising concerns about its effect on the U.S. recovery. The 17-nation Eurozone economy contracted 0.2% in the first quarter compared with the previous quarter, according to data released Wednesday by Eurostat, the region's statistical office. It was the sixth straight quarter of contraction, exceeding the five-quarter recession from 2008-09.
WORLD
November 14, 2012 | By Lauren Frayer
MADRID -- Millions of workers went on strike and joined anti-austerity protests throughout much of southern Europe on Wednesday, in the first joint labor action across countries suffering the worst of the continent's debt crisis. Workers walked off the job in Spain, Portugal, Italy and Greece, with smaller protests in France, Belgium and Cyprus. Tens of thousands of people packed Madrid's wide avenues, waving trade union flags and forming picket lines around shops that remained open.
WORLD
September 16, 2012 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO - Melanito Biyouha tries to remember the languages she's heard today at her restaurant in Sao Paulo's African corner. "English, Bassa, Wolof, Swahili, umm … Lingala," she said. "And of course Portuguese, both with Angolan, Mozambican and Brazilian accents. " She speaks Portuguese with a Cameroonian accent, she said. Almost 500 years since slavery set Brazil on the path to establishing the largest African-heritage population outside Africa, Biyouha's restaurant has become a home base for the first significant voluntary influx of Africans into the country.
OPINION
June 14, 2012 | Doyle McManus
Milan, Italy - From the American side of the Atlantic, the debate over Europe's economic future often sounds like a bloodless, mind-numbing discussion of currency zones, bank recapitalization and interest rates. But in countries with fragile economies like Spain and Italy, it takes on real-life urgency. Pain is everywhere. Unfinished construction sites litter classic landscapes, monuments to businesses that have failed and bank loans that didn't come through. In Italy, where I have spent the last three weeks, the unemployment rate has topped 10% and news broadcasts have given lavish coverage to a wave of suicides by small-business owners who couldn't meet payrolls or tax bills.
OPINION
October 4, 2005 | Charles A. Kupchan, CHARLES A. KUPCHAN, a professor of international affairs at Georgetown University and a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, is the author of "The End of the American Era" (Vintage, 2003).
WHEN IT UNVEILED a plan last month offering parents new financial incentives to have more children, the French government was seeking to redress a looming and deeply worrisome demographic crisis -- one that affects not just France but all of Europe. The French have one of Europe's highest fertility rates -- about 1.9 children per woman -- compared with only 1.3 in Germany, Italy and Spain. But because a fertility rate of 2.
WORLD
August 25, 2005 | From Associated Press
Romanian officials said Wednesday that seven people had drowned overnight when flood waters surged into their homes, and more than 250 residents of a submerged section of the Swiss capital, Bern, were evacuated by helicopter. Some flood victims waded into their homes to shovel mud while crews cleared debris from streets. Heavy rains across central and southern Europe have killed 34 people this week, authorities said, adding that the number could climb because some people were missing.
OPINION
January 9, 2009
On the surface, the battle between Russia and Ukraine that has choked off natural-gas supplies to much of Europe in the dead of a cold winter is a purely commercial dispute. Deeper down, it's something more menacing -- part of what looks like a calculated strategy by Russia to regain influence over countries that were once part of the Soviet empire and to neutralize European opposition. Gazprom, Russia's state gas monopoly, is as much a policy arm of the Kremlin as it is a company.
WORLD
July 28, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
It was raining, but then an English summer wouldn't be English without a shower. The sprinkle quickly became a downpour -- well, not really a downpour, people said, because these are people who have as many words for rain as Eskimos have for snow. "It was just blankets of rain," said Maggie Clutterbuck, whose daughter's restaurant in the center of town had a basement full of water within hours.
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