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January 27, 1990 | DAN BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES and Dan Byrne, a former news editor of The Times, competed in the 1982-83 BOC Challenge, a solo around-the-world race
The "Roaring 40s" of the South Atlantic and Indian oceans sprang a trap on three solo sailors in the Globe Challenge around-the-world sailboat race. The bleak, cold, storm-whipped Southern Ocean capsized one boat, dismasted another and crippled a third with a knockdown near 40 degrees south latitude. All three skippers--Frenchmen Philippe Poupon and Jean Yves Terlain and South African Bertie Reed--are out of the 27,000-nautical-mile non-stop race that began Nov.
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SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Amina Khan
The mysterious "bio-duck" sounds in the ocean that have baffled seafarers for decades are actually calls from unseen populations of minke whales, scientists say. The discovery detailed in the journal Biology Letters will allow researchers to better track these animals even when they're out of sight. “Our results solve the mystery around the source of the bio-duck sound, which is one of the most prevalent sounds in the Southern Ocean during austral winter and can now be attributed unequivocally to the Antarctic minke whale,” the study authors wrote.
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WORLD
March 31, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The United Nations' highest court on Monday ruled that Japan's Antarctic whaling operations are not for "scientific purposes" as Tokyo claims and ordered an immediate halt to the practice. In a 12-4 ruling, the International Court of Justice said Japan failed to demonstrate during a three-week trial last year that its claimed right to harvest about 1,000 whales each year was for scientific research. "The evidence does not establish that the program's design and implementation are reasonable in relation to achieving its stated objectives," the court's presiding judge, Peter Tomka, read from the ruling . The court ordered Japan to cease its whaling operations in the Southern Ocean "with immediate effect.
WORLD
March 31, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The United Nations' highest court on Monday ruled that Japan's Antarctic whaling operations are not for "scientific purposes" as Tokyo claims and ordered an immediate halt to the practice. In a 12-4 ruling, the International Court of Justice said Japan failed to demonstrate during a three-week trial last year that its claimed right to harvest about 1,000 whales each year was for scientific research. "The evidence does not establish that the program's design and implementation are reasonable in relation to achieving its stated objectives," the court's presiding judge, Peter Tomka, read from the ruling . The court ordered Japan to cease its whaling operations in the Southern Ocean "with immediate effect.
SPORTS
February 25, 1998 | RICH ROBERTS
An American has never won sailing's supreme test, the Whitbread Round the World Race, but San Francisco's Paul Cayard has a stranglehold on it after winning the most difficult leg by more than 500 miles. Cayard, 38, brought the Swedish-sponsored Whitbread 60 EF Language with half an American crew into Sao Sebastiao, Brazil, early Tuesday morning at the end of the fifth and most difficult leg, a 6,670-nautical-mile sail through the icy Southern Ocean from New Zealand around Cape Horn.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1992 | JAMES A. MICHENER, Michener is the author of more than 40 books, most recently a memoir titled "The World Is My Home" (Random House). His next book is "Mexico," a novel to be published later this year.
IN THE YEARS WHEN I TRAVELED the three major oceans of the world--Pacific, Atlantic, Indian--and wrote about them, I often speculated as to how they were defined geographically. In the north I had no problem. The Indian Ocean was terminated dramatically by India itself. The Pacific ended where the Aleutian Islands cut it off, with Alaska and Siberia looming behind. And the Atlantic was defined by Greenland, Iceland and the huge islands of eastern Canada.
SPORTS
August 30, 1986 | DAN BYRNE
Here are the chief risks faced by the solo sailors in the BOC Challenge: COLLISION Being run down by a merchant ship is an ever-present hazard. Sailboats are hard to spot at night. The merchant ship's radar is usually scanning 25 miles ahead. A sailboat's blip is easy to miss at that distance, and once inside that 25-mile radar radius, a sailboat can be run down without the merchantman's crew even knowing it hit something.
SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Amina Khan
The mysterious "bio-duck" sounds in the ocean that have baffled seafarers for decades are actually calls from unseen populations of minke whales, scientists say. The discovery detailed in the journal Biology Letters will allow researchers to better track these animals even when they're out of sight. “Our results solve the mystery around the source of the bio-duck sound, which is one of the most prevalent sounds in the Southern Ocean during austral winter and can now be attributed unequivocally to the Antarctic minke whale,” the study authors wrote.
SPORTS
August 7, 1985 | RICHARD BUFFUM
The ultimate in sailing challenges is the BOC Challenge Single-handed Race Around the World. As one of the interested says, "Hundreds of men and women have climbed Everest; only a handful have raced alone around the world via Cape Horn." He is Georgs Kolesnikov, 43, of Newport Beach. Such an adventure has been his lifelong dream. When he was a teen-ager, he drew what he called a "continent and island-hopping course around world" on a National Geographic map.
SPORTS
February 8, 1987 | DAN BYRNE, Dan Byrne, a former news editor for the Los Angeles Times, was one of the finishers of the 1982-83 BOC Challenge.
They heard it on their ham radios. Dennis Connor had won back the America's Cup, and even the defeated Australians cheered by the thousands as Stars & Stripes was towed victoriously into port after the final race. The 16 skippers left in the solo around-the-world sailboat race might have smiled to themselves. They are competing in what one of them called the "empty stadium." At best, sailboat racing ranks between championship darts and marbles as a spectator sport.
WORLD
March 20, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian and W.J. Hennigan
The U.S. Navy dispatched its most technologically advanced search aircraft to an empty quarter of the Indian Ocean on Thursday to look for two large pieces of debris that may provide the first physical evidence in the investigation of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Experts were hopeful that the debris would not turn out to be another of the false leads and misinterpreted data that have dogged the investigation into why the Boeing 777 carrying 239...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2010 | By Catherine Saillant,, Los Angeles Times
A spotter jet over the Indian Ocean late Thursday made contact with 16-year-old Abby Sunderland, the Thousand Oaks solo sailor who was adrift in rough seas and heavy winds in her quest to circumnavigate the globe, a spokesman for the teen's family said. The Qantas Airways jetliner with dozens of harbor patrol spotters on board made radio contact with Sunderland. Her boat was upright, but the mast had been knocked off by rough seas. She was in good health and had plenty of food and was waiting for the arrival of a fishing boat in about a day, said Jeff Casher, a technical advisor for the voyage.
SPORTS
February 25, 1998 | RICH ROBERTS
An American has never won sailing's supreme test, the Whitbread Round the World Race, but San Francisco's Paul Cayard has a stranglehold on it after winning the most difficult leg by more than 500 miles. Cayard, 38, brought the Swedish-sponsored Whitbread 60 EF Language with half an American crew into Sao Sebastiao, Brazil, early Tuesday morning at the end of the fifth and most difficult leg, a 6,670-nautical-mile sail through the icy Southern Ocean from New Zealand around Cape Horn.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1992 | JAMES A. MICHENER, Michener is the author of more than 40 books, most recently a memoir titled "The World Is My Home" (Random House). His next book is "Mexico," a novel to be published later this year.
IN THE YEARS WHEN I TRAVELED the three major oceans of the world--Pacific, Atlantic, Indian--and wrote about them, I often speculated as to how they were defined geographically. In the north I had no problem. The Indian Ocean was terminated dramatically by India itself. The Pacific ended where the Aleutian Islands cut it off, with Alaska and Siberia looming behind. And the Atlantic was defined by Greenland, Iceland and the huge islands of eastern Canada.
SPORTS
January 27, 1990 | DAN BYRNE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES and Dan Byrne, a former news editor of The Times, competed in the 1982-83 BOC Challenge, a solo around-the-world race
The "Roaring 40s" of the South Atlantic and Indian oceans sprang a trap on three solo sailors in the Globe Challenge around-the-world sailboat race. The bleak, cold, storm-whipped Southern Ocean capsized one boat, dismasted another and crippled a third with a knockdown near 40 degrees south latitude. All three skippers--Frenchmen Philippe Poupon and Jean Yves Terlain and South African Bertie Reed--are out of the 27,000-nautical-mile non-stop race that began Nov.
SPORTS
February 8, 1987 | DAN BYRNE, Dan Byrne, a former news editor for the Los Angeles Times, was one of the finishers of the 1982-83 BOC Challenge.
They heard it on their ham radios. Dennis Connor had won back the America's Cup, and even the defeated Australians cheered by the thousands as Stars & Stripes was towed victoriously into port after the final race. The 16 skippers left in the solo around-the-world sailboat race might have smiled to themselves. They are competing in what one of them called the "empty stadium." At best, sailboat racing ranks between championship darts and marbles as a spectator sport.
SPORTS
January 10, 1987 | DAN BYRNE, Dan Byrne, a former news editor at the Los Angeles Times, was among 10 finishers of the first single-handed sailing race around the world in 1983
Britain's Harry Harkimo, at 61 the oldest sailor in the BOC single-handed race around the world, arrived today in Sydney, Australia, aboard his 41-foot sloop Double Cross, the last to finish the second leg of the race that began here in September. Two things dominated the thoughts and conversation of the 18 racers as they prepared for the next and longest leg, the 8,200 nautical-miles across the South Pacific, around Cape Horn to Rio de Janeiro. It will start Jan. 18.
WORLD
March 20, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian and W.J. Hennigan
The U.S. Navy dispatched its most technologically advanced search aircraft to an empty quarter of the Indian Ocean on Thursday to look for two large pieces of debris that may provide the first physical evidence in the investigation of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Experts were hopeful that the debris would not turn out to be another of the false leads and misinterpreted data that have dogged the investigation into why the Boeing 777 carrying 239...
SPORTS
January 10, 1987 | DAN BYRNE, Dan Byrne, a former news editor at the Los Angeles Times, was among 10 finishers of the first single-handed sailing race around the world in 1983
Britain's Harry Harkimo, at 61 the oldest sailor in the BOC single-handed race around the world, arrived today in Sydney, Australia, aboard his 41-foot sloop Double Cross, the last to finish the second leg of the race that began here in September. Two things dominated the thoughts and conversation of the 18 racers as they prepared for the next and longest leg, the 8,200 nautical-miles across the South Pacific, around Cape Horn to Rio de Janeiro. It will start Jan. 18.
SPORTS
August 30, 1986 | DAN BYRNE
Here are the chief risks faced by the solo sailors in the BOC Challenge: COLLISION Being run down by a merchant ship is an ever-present hazard. Sailboats are hard to spot at night. The merchant ship's radar is usually scanning 25 miles ahead. A sailboat's blip is easy to miss at that distance, and once inside that 25-mile radar radius, a sailboat can be run down without the merchantman's crew even knowing it hit something.
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