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March 3, 1995 | Reuters
A Guatemalan mayor was shot dead by gunmen who ambushed his car in the southern province of Jutiapa, police said Thursday. Mario Nery Escriba Elvira, 48, mayor of Quesada, was returning from the provincial capital of Jutiapa on Wednesday when the attack occurred, a police spokesman said.
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WORLD
March 30, 2011 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
As Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh struggles to retain power in the face of weeks-long protests, the central government's control over restive provinces in the north and south has weakened substantially in recent days, both officials and insurgent leaders said Tuesday. For years, Yemen has battled a tribal insurgency in the north and Islamic militants in the south, and both groups have capitalized on the political turmoil of the last two months to make territorial gains. The most visible indication of the losses came Monday when a large explosion occurred at a munitions factory in Jaar, a city in the southern province of Abyan, killing more than 100 people.
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WORLD
June 22, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 40 people have been killed across Pakistan by extremely hot weather, and the searing temperatures are expected to last at least a couple of more days. Most of the fatalities have occurred in the eastern province of Punjab, the country's most populous, where temperatures soared to 118 on Monday. At least 12 people have died in the southern province of Sindh, district officials there said.
WORLD
January 22, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
British troops who have served there tend to depart from standard military terminology when they talk about what kind of place it is. They use words like "spooky," "eerie," "haunted. " Or they might invoke a short, sharp profanity. They are speaking of Sangin, an enclave in Helmand province that is perhaps the Afghan war's most dangerous district. As a rule, a place so deadly is also strategic, and Sangin is no exception. In a province that supplies most of the world's opium, the district is an epicenter for narcotics processing and drug transport ?
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
At least 185 civilians have been killed in southern Burundi in the past two weeks, villagers said, accusing the army of murdering most of them. The army vigorously denied that it had killed civilians and blamed ethnic Hutu rebels for the attack. The killings, in the southern province of Makamba, coincided with the resumption of peace talks aimed at ending Burundi's five-year ethnic conflict. About 150,000 people, mostly civilians, have been killed since 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Abdel-Halim Moussa, 73, a former Egyptian interior minister who advocated a conciliatory approach toward Islamic insurgents, died of cancer Saturday in a Cairo hospital. Moussa was interior minister from 1990 to 1993, when Islamic extremists were waging a violent campaign to overthrow President Hosni Mubarak and replace his regime with strict Islamic rule. Moussa replaced Zaki Badr, who had advocated killing the radicals, which had only increased hostility between the militants and police.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | Times Wire Services
Ethnic clashes spread Saturday to rural areas of Sind province as motorcycle-riding gunmen shot and killed two Pakistani journalists, minutes after the pair had completed reports about the violence that has turned Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto's home province into a battleground.
NEWS
September 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
Serbian forces reportedly launched a new offensive against separatists in western Kosovo on Tuesday, a day after U.S. envoys failed to persuade Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic to halt the attacks. Serbian forces also accused ethnic Albanian rebels of mass executions of Serbian civilians and showed reporters the bodies of some of the alleged victims.
WORLD
March 30, 2011 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
As Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh struggles to retain power in the face of weeks-long protests, the central government's control over restive provinces in the north and south has weakened substantially in recent days, both officials and insurgent leaders said Tuesday. For years, Yemen has battled a tribal insurgency in the north and Islamic militants in the south, and both groups have capitalized on the political turmoil of the last two months to make territorial gains. The most visible indication of the losses came Monday when a large explosion occurred at a munitions factory in Jaar, a city in the southern province of Abyan, killing more than 100 people.
WORLD
November 1, 2007 | Doug Smith and Said Rifai, Times Staff Writers
Saying that Iraqi forces are now capable of dealing with the violence that persists in the south, Britain's defense secretary said Wednesday that his government intended to hand over security for the area by mid-December. Defense Secretary Des Browne acknowledged that sectarian power struggles and gangsterism continue in oil-rich Basra province, but said Iraqi forces were best able to address them now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2010 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
His friends say he was the kind of person who inspired others to slow down and appreciate life. And that's what people in Calaveras County did after Marine Lance Cpl. Gavin R. Brummund was killed in Afghanistan . Thousands stood solemnly in tribute along California Highway 4 as the grieving families of Brummund and his young widow returned home after claiming the Marine's body in Dover, Del. Merchants in the little towns of...
WORLD
April 4, 2010 | By Mark Magnier
The Islamic teacher sat on the wooden porch of his house smiling politely, his infant son playing at his feet. Those who study the Koran are automatically suspect, Dul Nasir Hama said, adding that he's not a terrorist nor are his students part of the insurgency. As he spoke, a Thai army patrol skirted the grounds of his madrasa in Pattani, a jungle area of southern Thailand with a long history of violent clashes between Malay Muslims and Thai Buddhists. "They're afraid to come in here," he said.
WORLD
March 14, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Usama Redha
Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's slate had an early lead Saturday as partial results trickled in from the parliamentary elections last weekend. With 10% to 30% of the vote counted in 11 of Iraq's 18 provinces, Maliki's State of Law slate was winning in Baghdad and four southern provinces, Iraq's Independent High Electoral Commission reported. But his lead could easily be wiped away, with final election results expected to take at least a month to certify. State of Law, which bills itself as nonsectarian, had predicted it would win 100 seats in the 325-member parliament, taking Baghdad and Iraq's nine southern provinces.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2010 | By Jean Merl
One of Eboni Roebuck's favorite memories of her brother, Marine Lance Cpl. Omar G. Roebuck, is also one of her most recent: She, her brother and their father, John, had set out from their Moreno Valley home on motorcycles -- their favorite form of transportation -- and had ridden through the late-summer sunshine to a little diner with an ocean view in San Clemente. They had lunch and enjoyed the day together, she recalled, adding, "It was nice and sunny, a beautiful day." Soon after, Omar Roebuck left for Helmand province in Afghanistan, on the Pakistani border.
WORLD
December 31, 2009 | By Tony Perry
It's not yet 10 a.m., and Lt. Col. William McCollough must confront a pair of problems that threaten to undercut Marine success in this onetime Taliban stronghold. Two members of the community council, the group organized by Marines to instill confidence among villagers in their government, have been killed, probably by Taliban fighters. The Afghan police response has been sluggish. Meanwhile, rumors are sweeping the farming community that there is favoritism and corruption in the U.S.-sponsored program to distribute wheat seed and fertilizer.
WORLD
August 1, 2009 | Laura King
The month began with a fatal roadside bombing and ended with word that an American had died of wounds suffered in a firefight. After nearly eight years of warfare in Afghanistan, July proved by far the deadliest month yet for U.S. troops and their foreign allies. Bombs and rocket attacks, ambushes and aviation accidents killed many of the 72 foreign troops, including 43 Americans, according to data at the website icasualties.org. Previously, the highest monthly U.S.
WORLD
December 31, 2009 | By Tony Perry
It's not yet 10 a.m., and Lt. Col. William McCollough must confront a pair of problems that threaten to undercut Marine success in this onetime Taliban stronghold. Two members of the community council, the group organized by Marines to instill confidence among villagers in their government, have been killed, probably by Taliban fighters. The Afghan police response has been sluggish. Meanwhile, rumors are sweeping the farming community that there is favoritism and corruption in the U.S.-sponsored program to distribute wheat seed and fertilizer.
WORLD
January 22, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
British troops who have served there tend to depart from standard military terminology when they talk about what kind of place it is. They use words like "spooky," "eerie," "haunted. " Or they might invoke a short, sharp profanity. They are speaking of Sangin, an enclave in Helmand province that is perhaps the Afghan war's most dangerous district. As a rule, a place so deadly is also strategic, and Sangin is no exception. In a province that supplies most of the world's opium, the district is an epicenter for narcotics processing and drug transport ?
WORLD
May 8, 2009 | Laura King
Anti-U.S. protests erupted Thursday in a provincial capital near a string of desert villages where scores of Afghan civilians were killed this week during clashes between insurgents and U.S.-led troops. U.S. military officials, meanwhile, expressed doubts that all the deaths in the Bala Baluk district of western Farah province were the result of airstrikes called in by American special operations forces.
WORLD
November 1, 2007 | Doug Smith and Said Rifai, Times Staff Writers
Saying that Iraqi forces are now capable of dealing with the violence that persists in the south, Britain's defense secretary said Wednesday that his government intended to hand over security for the area by mid-December. Defense Secretary Des Browne acknowledged that sectarian power struggles and gangsterism continue in oil-rich Basra province, but said Iraqi forces were best able to address them now.
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