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NATIONAL
April 28, 2011 | By Richard Fausset and Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
A deadly storm front pummeled Alabama and at least five other Southern states, spawning tornadoes and leaving officials on Thursday facing a climbing death toll, major property damage and an intense search-and-rescue effort after one of the worst such disasters in decades. The number of deaths hit 162 in Alabama alone, with loss of life in Mississippi, Tennessee, Georgia, Virginia and Kentucky bringing the preliminary total to about 250. That number is expected to rise, officials said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 16, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers announced Thursday bipartisan legislation that would restore key protections of the Voting Rights Act that were thrown out by the Supreme Court last summer. The bill would also establish new criteria to determine whether states need to seek federal approval for proposed changes to voting rules. The legislation is a response to the high court's ruling in June that Southern states had been unfairly singled out by the long-standing formula used to determine which states must seek federal "pre-clearance" before changing their voting laws.
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NATIONAL
February 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Tornadoes tore across four Southern states, demolishing homes, ripping the roof off a shopping mall and blowing apart warehouses in a rare spasm of violent winter weather that killed at least 22 people and injured dozens more. The twisters that slammed Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee and Kentucky were part of a line of storms that raged across the nation's midsection at the end of a day of presidential contests.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
It was always the case that the nation's medically uninsured were disproportionately non-white, poor and southern. These people were the prime targets of the Affordable Care Act, which aimed to bring them coverage in part by the federally-funded expansion of Medicaid. Two surveys released Tuesday by the Kaiser Family Foundation show how the demographics of the uninsured will change, thanks to the ACA. More precisely, the surveys show how they will change as a result of inaction -- the failure of 25 states to expand Medicaid, which the ACA's drafters expected to address the coverage problems of the poor.
SCIENCE
August 30, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The United States continues to get fatter, with Mississippi and other Southern states leading the way, according to a report issued Tuesday by the advocacy group Trust for America's Health. The report found 29.5% of Mississippi residents were obese. Nine of the 10 states with the highest rates of obesity are in the South, the report says. At the other end of the spectrum, Colorado is the leanest state, with 16.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1990 | From Reuters
The government-owned Export-Import Bank of Japan is studying a request from three Southern U.S. states for subsidized loans, but a decision on the matter is still a way off, bank officials said today. The governors of Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi first raised the idea of the low-cost loans in September, 1988. The bank has been informally studying the possibility since then. "It is very premature," said Tadahiko Nakagawa, manager of the bank's international relations division.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2004 | Matea Gold, Times Staff Writer
John F. Kerry racked up four more wins in Democratic presidential primaries Tuesday, while on the campaign trail he continued to focus his fire on President Bush. Lopsided victories in Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas delivered Kerry a slew of new delegates. But his support was not universal. North Carolina Sen. John Edwards, who pulled out of the race last week, drew 16% of the vote in Louisiana -- enough to pick up a few new delegates.
NEWS
February 10, 1988 | Associated Press
Secretary of Education William J. Bennett announced today that his department has found four Southern states in full compliance with civil rights law in their college systems, while six others must take further steps to eliminate the vestiges of segregation. The six states that Bennett said are in partial violation of the law are Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Missouri, Oklahoma and Virginia.
NEWS
June 28, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty years after federal marshals forced Mississippi to open the doors of its best state colleges to black students, the Supreme Court ruled Friday that the state has not done nearly enough to dismantle its formerly segregated system of higher education. Mississippi, along with the other Southern states, has an "affirmative duty to dismantle its prior dual university system," the court declared, an obligation it said Mississippi has failed to meet.
NATIONAL
May 11, 2007 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
Rarely do experts extol the virtues of public education in the South. So it was notable when a report released Thursday said the Southeast led the nation in state-funded early childhood education. The Southern Education Foundation, a charity based in Atlanta, said the Southeast provided public prekindergarten to the largest percentage of 3- and 4-year-olds in the country: 19%, compared with 12% in the Northeast, 9% in the Midwest and 5.6% in the West.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - In a regional air pollution battle with partisan overtones, the Obama administration appeared to make headway Tuesday in persuading the Supreme Court to allow tougher federal environmental standards to prevent ozone and other emissions from coal-producing Midwestern and Southern states from wafting over Northeastern states. The politically charged dispute pits the Obama administration and environmentalists against mostly Republican-led states with less stringent industrial pollution controls, as well as the electric power industry.
OPINION
June 29, 2013 | By Michael J. Klarman
Two blockbuster cases decided in the final week of the Supreme Court's 2012-13 term invalidated critical provisions of federal statutes. In United States vs. Windsor, the court struck down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act of 1996, which defined marriage for purposes of federal law as a union between a man and a woman. In Shelby County vs. Holder, the court invalidated a key provision of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, effectively eliminating the requirement that certain jurisdictions submit proposed election-law changes to federal officials for review before implementation.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A sharply divided Supreme Court has struck down a key part of the historic Voting Rights Act of 1965, freeing the Southern states from federal oversight of their election laws and setting off a fierce reaction from civil rights advocates and Democratic leaders. The court's conservative majority moved boldly Tuesday to rein in a law revered by civil rights groups that is credited with transforming the South by ensuring blacks could register and vote. In doing so, the court eliminated a tool that the Justice Department used hundreds of times to prevent cities, counties and states from adopting allegedly discriminatory voting rules.
SCIENCE
April 17, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Infant mortality in the U.S. has declined 12% since 2005 after holding steady for many years, according to data released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The infant mortality rate in 2011 was 6.05 deaths per every 1,000 live births, down from 6.87 in 2005, according to the report from the National Center for Health Statistics. Some of the biggest gains were seen in Southern states, though the region still has the highest infant mortality rates overall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2013 | By Anthony York
With the field in the Los Angeles mayor's race now whittled down to two, more state legislators from Southern California are taking sides. Councilman Eric Garcetti announced a trio of endorsements Monday from state Sens. Kevin De Leon (D-Los Angeles) and Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) as well as former Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez. “These three legislative leaders will be powerful voices in this election and will help me build support in neighborhoods throughout our city," Garcetti said in a statement.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2013 | By David Horsey
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia is alleged to be one of the great intellects of conservative jurisprudence, but his comments during oral arguments over a challenge to the 1965 Voting Rights Act displayed all the mental acuity of a third-tier talk radio bozo. Shelby County, Ala., is making the case against the voting law. Section 5 of the act empowers the federal government to negate new local and state voting rules if they would lead to discrimination against minority voters.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - In a regional air pollution battle with partisan overtones, the Obama administration appeared to make headway Tuesday in persuading the Supreme Court to allow tougher federal environmental standards to prevent ozone and other emissions from coal-producing Midwestern and Southern states from wafting over Northeastern states. The politically charged dispute pits the Obama administration and environmentalists against mostly Republican-led states with less stringent industrial pollution controls, as well as the electric power industry.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A sharply divided Supreme Court has struck down a key part of the historic Voting Rights Act of 1965, freeing the Southern states from federal oversight of their election laws and setting off a fierce reaction from civil rights advocates and Democratic leaders. The court's conservative majority moved boldly Tuesday to rein in a law revered by civil rights groups that is credited with transforming the South by ensuring blacks could register and vote. In doing so, the court eliminated a tool that the Justice Department used hundreds of times to prevent cities, counties and states from adopting allegedly discriminatory voting rules.
NATIONAL
February 27, 2013 | By David G. Savage and David Lauter, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The historic Voting Rights Act appeared to be in deep trouble Wednesday after the Supreme Court's conservative justices argued during a racially charged debate that targeting the South for special scrutiny was no longer fair. The unusually tense discussion split along ideological lines. Justices from the left and right took turns arguing the case - and arguing with one another over whether racism and racial discrimination remain problems. At one point, Justice Antonin Scalia referred to the law as a "perpetuation of racial entitlement," a phrase that irked Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who voiced strong objection earlier this week to a Texas prosecutor's focus on defendants' race.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court will take up a case from Alabama next week to decide whether to strike down a key part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a landmark measure that made voting a reality for blacks in the South and won extension by a near-unanimous vote from Congress in 2006. Critics on the right agree the law was a success, but they contend it is now outdated and unfair to the South. They also say it is used mostly as a way to force states to draw electoral districts that favor black or Latino candidates.
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