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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1999 | RICHARD TAFEL, Richard Tafel is executive director of Log Cabin Republicans, a nationwide group of gay Republicans
A strategic shift the Republican Party made nearly 30 years ago has helped to slowly poison its image before the American people, and it may be the Achilles' heel that brings it down in 2000. In 1972, the core of President Nixon's reelection campaign was not break-ins and wire-tapping but rather the "Southern strategy," or as the Nixon team called it, "positive polarization."
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OPINION
April 25, 2014 | By Paul Thornton
How Lincolnesque is the Party of Lincoln? Depends on who you ask. According to reader Joan Smith of Northridge, the Republican Party that freed the slaves in the 19th century and stood in opposition to civil rights-averse Southern Democrats in the 1960s doesn't deserve a bad rap. In a letter to the editor published Sunday, Smith wrote: “The Republican Party since the time of Abraham Lincoln has championed civil rights, while the Democratic Party...
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NEWS
June 10, 1994 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Jack Kemp, likely a strong candidate for the 1996 Republican presidential nomination, has told GOP office seekers who want his help this year that he will campaign for them only if they actively canvass for votes in minority neighborhoods.
OPINION
September 6, 2013
Re "GOP thrives at local level," Sept. 4 Randy Pope, a conservative city councilman in the Sacramento suburb of Oakley, complains that his freedoms are restricted because regulations limit his choice of light bulbs, toilets and shower heads. He confuses freedom with unrestrained resource-guzzling. A democracy is not a place where someone can overconsume resources selfishly. All those other pesky people need access to resources too. With Pope's other liberties obviously intact, he has confused freedom with greed, which he is still free to express in a major U.S. newspaper.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton's support among black voters is hemorrhaging, the Rev. Jesse Jackson pledged Thursday to support his party's presidential nominee--but he made it clear that his backing will be perfunctory at best. Clinton's campaign--including his choice of Tennessee Sen. Albert Gore Jr.
OPINION
April 25, 2014 | By Paul Thornton
How Lincolnesque is the Party of Lincoln? Depends on who you ask. According to reader Joan Smith of Northridge, the Republican Party that freed the slaves in the 19th century and stood in opposition to civil rights-averse Southern Democrats in the 1960s doesn't deserve a bad rap. In a letter to the editor published Sunday, Smith wrote: “The Republican Party since the time of Abraham Lincoln has championed civil rights, while the Democratic Party...
OPINION
September 6, 2013
Re "GOP thrives at local level," Sept. 4 Randy Pope, a conservative city councilman in the Sacramento suburb of Oakley, complains that his freedoms are restricted because regulations limit his choice of light bulbs, toilets and shower heads. He confuses freedom with unrestrained resource-guzzling. A democracy is not a place where someone can overconsume resources selfishly. All those other pesky people need access to resources too. With Pope's other liberties obviously intact, he has confused freedom with greed, which he is still free to express in a major U.S. newspaper.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Bill Clinton's choice of philosophical soul mate and geographical neighbor Albert Gore Jr. as a running mate reveals much about the course the Arkansas governor plans to take to the White House. The striking aspect of the Tennessee senator's selection is that it directly contravenes the thinking of many Democrats who believed that Ross Perot's likely independent candidacy would offer Clinton a chance to formulate a winning Southern strategy.
NEWS
February 17, 1988 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
With a teary embrace of his mother and an Olympic-style gold medal around his neck, Michael S. Dukakis met his cheering supporters here Tuesday night to declare the largest margin of victory in the history of contested Democratic presidential primaries in New Hampshire. "Last week in Iowa, our message started to shine through," a grinning Dukakis told a packed victory party. "We won the bronze. Tonight our message came through loud and clear.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Rick Santorum has won the Mississippi GOP presidential primary, according to an Associated Press projection, following his earlier triumph in neighboring Alabama on Tuesday. The dual victories are a major boost to the former Pennsylvania senator's campaign at a time when the primary calendar favors him. He's spending tonight in Louisiana, another deeply conservative state which holds a March 24 primary. Speaking at his campaign headquarters there, Santorum rallied his supporters with what he portrayed as another against-the-odds turn in his underdog campaign.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
Rick Santorum has won the Mississippi GOP presidential primary, according to an Associated Press projection, following his earlier triumph in neighboring Alabama on Tuesday. The dual victories are a major boost to the former Pennsylvania senator's campaign at a time when the primary calendar favors him. He's spending tonight in Louisiana, another deeply conservative state which holds a March 24 primary. Speaking at his campaign headquarters there, Santorum rallied his supporters with what he portrayed as another against-the-odds turn in his underdog campaign.
OPINION
November 2, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
"Demography is destiny. " After Barack Obama's election in 2008, the phrase was on the lips of progressive prognosticators everywhere. A permanent alignment had arrived. The growing ranks of Latinos, the reliably liberal voting patterns of blacks, the Republican Party's longstanding problem with single women, plus the fact that surveys found young people ? a.k.a. millennials ? to be the most liberal generation in decades all proved that the aging, white GOP was destined for near-eternal rump status.
NATIONAL
October 24, 2006 | Peter Wallsten, Times Staff Writer
A new Republican Party television ad featuring a scantily clad white woman winking and inviting a black candidate to "call me" is drawing charges of race-baiting, with critics saying it contradicts a landmark GOP statement last year that the party was wrong in past decades to use racial appeals to win support from white voters.
OPINION
June 9, 2005
As the Organization of American States gathered in Fort Lauderdale this week, President Bush took a break from his focus on democratizing the Mideast to fly to Florida on Monday to insist that the group become more aggressive about monitoring, and defending, democracy in its 34-member nations. The sense of urgency expressed by Bush and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice in their speeches is warranted. Even as the OAS met, Bolivia's fragile democracy was being overrun by mob rule.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2004 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
A week ago, Betsy Tabor knew virtually nothing about John Edwards. But she left impressed after watching the North Carolina senator with the youthful good looks and Southern accent talk to an overflow crowd last Wednesday at a VFW hall in this coastal city. So Tabor returned Monday for another sampling, joining some 700 people to hear Edwards speak beneath the soaring curved ceiling of Portsmouth's 175-year-old South Church.
OPINION
December 21, 2002
Leaders within the Republican Party, including President Bush, forced Sen. Trent Lott to resign his leadership position on Friday. His ill-advised comments have publicly exposed the reason why Republicans repeatedly fail to make inroads with Southern minority voters. Those minority voters have known that Republicans in the South are different from other Republicans. The growth of the Republican Party in the once-solid Democratic South is the result of various long-term, conscious plans to entice conservative white Southerners into the party by using racial "code words."
NEWS
September 7, 1987 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
Georgia Sen. Sam Nunn's decision not to enter the 1988 Democratic presidential campaign has dramatically raised the stakes in the South's Super Tuesday primary next March, especially for the two candidates who have so far mounted the strongest bids for the nomination--Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis and Missouri Rep. Richard A. Gephardt.
OPINION
November 2, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
"Demography is destiny. " After Barack Obama's election in 2008, the phrase was on the lips of progressive prognosticators everywhere. A permanent alignment had arrived. The growing ranks of Latinos, the reliably liberal voting patterns of blacks, the Republican Party's longstanding problem with single women, plus the fact that surveys found young people ? a.k.a. millennials ? to be the most liberal generation in decades all proved that the aging, white GOP was destined for near-eternal rump status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1999 | RICHARD TAFEL, Richard Tafel is executive director of Log Cabin Republicans, a nationwide group of gay Republicans
A strategic shift the Republican Party made nearly 30 years ago has helped to slowly poison its image before the American people, and it may be the Achilles' heel that brings it down in 2000. In 1972, the core of President Nixon's reelection campaign was not break-ins and wire-tapping but rather the "Southern strategy," or as the Nixon team called it, "positive polarization."
BUSINESS
September 11, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Latin American trade on the increase because of lower tariff barriers and the new North American Free Trade Agreement, more Americans are seeking jobs south of the border. And although the job market can be a tough one to crack, U.S. job hunters with the right training and language skills can prevail. It's a difficult job market because U.S. companies and Latin American firms are not as eager to hire Americans as they once were.
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