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September 17, 1985
Pope John Paul II is expected to make an eight-day tour of the western and southern United States in 1987, officials of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco said. "We're in the pre-planning stage," said Father Miles Riley, director of communications for the archdiocese. "The U.S. Catholic Conference (composed of the nation's bishops and based in Washington, D.C.) is working closely with the Vatican. . . .
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NATIONAL
September 24, 2008 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
When the gas gauge on Jada Burns' Kia wagon was on empty Tuesday afternoon, she lucked out, catching her neighborhood Chevron station at a time when its pumps were open. But the clerk, Mamadou Diallo, said he expected to be sold out by rush hour. With drivers already forming a line, it was about 20 minutes before Burns could fill up. "This is the first time I've had to actually wait," said Burns, 33, who earlier had passed by a station where the line was much longer. "This is crazy, isn't it?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
During World War II, a group of black soldiers were asked what should be done with Hitler if he were captured alive. Their response: "Paint him black and sentence him to life in Mississippi." --From "Attack on Terror: The FBI Against the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi," by Don Whitehead Everybody stared hard at the stage. A tall, angry man--his glasses steamy with perspiration, his face as red as his suspenders--was giving a stem-winding White Citizens Council stump speech.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2008 | Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writer
Some places are defined by a single event. Roswell, N.M., will always be known for space aliens, Dallas for assassination. And this little town in the Piney Woods of eastern Mississippi will forever be the site of one of the most brutal crimes of the civil rights era.
NATIONAL
September 1, 2005 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Wednesday called Hurricane Katrina "one of the worst natural disasters in our nation's history" and directed his Homeland Security secretary to coordinate a massive recovery campaign that could take years to complete. As the president returned to Washington to lead a task force meeting on disaster relief, the scope of the devastation continued to unfold.
NEWS
January 12, 2006 | Chris Pasles
The New York-based Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has announced grants totaling $750,000 to benefit individual Gulf Coast artists and visual arts organizations devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. "We felt strongly that the arts have an important role in the healing of the area," foundation President Joel Wachs said Wednesday. "There are a lot of creative people who are suffering who are important to the fabric and the life of the community."
NATIONAL
July 11, 2004 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
The newly minted Democratic presidential ticket completed its first week together Saturday in Sen. John Edwards' home state, where a crowd estimated at 20,000 waited in stifling heat and humidity to cheer the idea of a two-term presidency for Sen. John F. Kerry -- and perhaps a turn in the Oval Office for their favorite son.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2003 | James Rainey and Mark Barabak, Times Staff Writers
Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, flogged by his opponents for three days for alleged insensitivity, expressed remorse Wednesday for appealing to Southerners who display the Confederate flag and sought to move his campaign back to less-inflammatory ground. Reversing earlier claims that he had no reason to apologize, Dean conceded in a speech in New York City that, in his attempt to reach out to poor whites in the South, he "started this discussion in a clumsy way."
NEWS
December 24, 1996 | From Associated Press
Black state lawmakers Monday backed the governor's plan to take the Confederate battle flag off the Statehouse dome and move it to a monument nearby. The 35-member black caucus was divided as late as last week over whether to go along with the plan, which Gov. David Beasley offered in hopes of resolving the bitter dispute. "We recognize that not everybody is going to be satisfied in terms of this compromise, but it is a step forward," said state Rep.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democratic presidential nominee Bill Clinton appealed to his fellow Southerners' sense of pride Tuesday, telling an assembly of the region's state legislators that GOP entreaties to "traditional values" placed President Bush in the White House but produced little benefit to their states.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Another round of severe weather raked the storm-weary South with rain, hail and high winds Friday, damaging homes and injuring at least five people in Tennessee and Kentucky. A mother and two children were hurt when strong thunderstorms moved through southern Kentucky in the early morning, knocking over their trailer near Bowling Green. Tara Duvall, a spokeswoman for Warren County Emergency Management, said all three were hospitalized.
NATIONAL
February 10, 2008 | Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writer
C. Barton Crattie, a Georgia land surveyor, did not expect to start a border war when he penned a newspaper article about a flawed 1818 survey that placed his state a mile below the Tennessee River. The mistake in calculating Georgia's northern corner, he figured, was just an odd historical footnote, an interesting digression for those who fret that the drought-stricken state will soon run out of water. "Unfortunately for . . .
NATIONAL
February 8, 2008 | Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writers
They knew they couldn't set this little country community right in a day -- the storms had been too brutal for that. But at least, they figured, they could clean it up. All along the two-lane road through town, men in hunting jackets moved around quickly in heavy machinery, plowing and piling debris. Farmers in ball caps amputated horizontal cedars, poplars and pines with buzzing chain saws. Church ladies in fresh makeup and work gloves tidied the yards in front of roofless homes.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
President Bush handed out hugs to people in Alabama and Georgia who survived killer tornadoes, and he mourned the 20, including eight high school students, who died. "Out of this rubble will emerge a better tomorrow," Bush said. He climbed over piles of concrete, insulation, broken glass and textbooks at the shattered high school in Enterprise, Ala. Be strong and set an example for the other 1,200 students, he told the student government president and three others.
NEWS
January 12, 2006 | Chris Pasles
The New York-based Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has announced grants totaling $750,000 to benefit individual Gulf Coast artists and visual arts organizations devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. "We felt strongly that the arts have an important role in the healing of the area," foundation President Joel Wachs said Wednesday. "There are a lot of creative people who are suffering who are important to the fabric and the life of the community."
NATIONAL
September 1, 2005 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Wednesday called Hurricane Katrina "one of the worst natural disasters in our nation's history" and directed his Homeland Security secretary to coordinate a massive recovery campaign that could take years to complete. As the president returned to Washington to lead a task force meeting on disaster relief, the scope of the devastation continued to unfold.
NEWS
July 1, 1988 | Jack Nelson
Not long ago, Democratic Chairman Paul G. Kirk Jr. called the South "vital to the party's success nationally" and urged the Democrats to pick a Southerner for their 1988 presidential or vice presidential nominee. But now that Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis is slated to receive the presidential nomination at the party's convention in Atlanta this month, Kirk, who comes from Boston, no longer thinks it is necessary to have a Southerner on the ticket.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If there is such a political animal as a radical moderate, Harry S. Ashmore may fit the bill. If there isn't, then maybe he can't be pigeonholed at all--which would be fine with him. For nearly half a century, Ashmore, 73, has promoted the virtues of reason and dialogue in this country's acrimonious and sometimes bloody battles over civil rights and social justice. But he also believes in rooting out inequity, however uncomfortable that may make the entrenched social order.
NATIONAL
September 1, 2005 | John Hendren and Mark Mazzetti, Times Staff Writers
The Army National Guard, already stressed by deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan, is doubling the number of troops it plans to send to the Gulf Coast as it shoulders the massive relief burden for Hurricane Katrina, Defense officials said Wednesday. The number of National Guard troops is expected to double to roughly 21,000 by today, for a total military force of about 28,000, including active-duty forces from the Army, Navy and Air Force.
NATIONAL
July 11, 2004 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
The newly minted Democratic presidential ticket completed its first week together Saturday in Sen. John Edwards' home state, where a crowd estimated at 20,000 waited in stifling heat and humidity to cheer the idea of a two-term presidency for Sen. John F. Kerry -- and perhaps a turn in the Oval Office for their favorite son.
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