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June 23, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fifth-generation tobacco grower, Rick Apple bristles when he is lumped in with cigarette companies in the public consciousness as a so-called merchant of death. "I've never forced a cigarette into anybody's mouth," said the farmer, taking a break from working the 250 acres he cultivates with his father and uncle. "I don't think any other farmer has either."
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NEWS
April 10, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton traveled to the tobacco belt Thursday to make a case for landmark legislation likely to shrink the region's lifeblood industry, and he was greeted by an avalanche of anxiety from farmers and employees of tobacco companies. Tobacco farmer Mattie Mack gave the president an earful, telling him that tobacco had paid a lifetime of bills for her family and that she opposes the legislation.
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NEWS
October 23, 1989 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Martha Rich, Edgefield County's assistant administrator, autumn brings a bitter harvest. It is budget time now, and she and other officials in this western South Carolina county of about 18,000 people must find ways to pay the increasingly expensive cost of providing medical and other services for migrant farm workers who pass through here during the spring and summer months.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fifth-generation tobacco grower, Rick Apple bristles when he is lumped in with cigarette companies in the public consciousness as a so-called merchant of death. "I've never forced a cigarette into anybody's mouth," said the farmer, taking a break from working the 250 acres he cultivates with his father and uncle. "I don't think any other farmer has either."
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | From Associated Press
Farmers across the South burned tires and brush Tuesday to protect blossoming peach trees and other crops as temperatures hit record lows, while up to 16 inches of snow covered the Ohio Valley. Some rural highways were still closed by drifts up to 18 feet high in Nebraska and Kansas, where blizzards that struck one week ago and again over the weekend were believed to have killed thousands of cattle. On the East Coast, heavy rain brought flood warnings in Maine and Connecticut.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton traveled to the tobacco belt Thursday to make a case for landmark legislation likely to shrink the region's lifeblood industry, and he was greeted by an avalanche of anxiety from farmers and employees of tobacco companies. Tobacco farmer Mattie Mack gave the president an earful, telling him that tobacco had paid a lifetime of bills for her family and that she opposes the legislation.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been so hot and rainless here this summer that even the Okefenokee Swamp seems to be drying up. At 396,000 acres--most of it in Georgia--the swamp remains one of America's premier freshwater wetlands, but this year's absence of rainfall has taken a toll. Water levels have dropped so much that officials at the Okefenokee Swamp Park say they have had to shorten boat tours from 10 miles to two miles. Rental canoes sit on the dock, unrented in the blazing sun.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been so hot and rainless here this summer that even the Okefenokee Swamp seems to be drying up. At 396,000 acres--most of it in Georgia--the swamp remains one of America's premier freshwater wetlands, but this year's absence of rainfall has taken a toll. Water levels have dropped so much that officials at the Okefenokee Swamp Park say they have had to shorten boat tours from 10 miles to two miles. Rental canoes sit on the dock, unrented in the blazing sun.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Martha Rich, Edgefield County's assistant administrator, autumn brings a bitter harvest. It is budget time now, and she and other officials in this western South Carolina county of about 18,000 people must find ways to pay the increasingly expensive cost of providing medical and other services for migrant farm workers who pass through here during the spring and summer months.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | From Associated Press
Farmers across the South burned tires and brush Tuesday to protect blossoming peach trees and other crops as temperatures hit record lows, while up to 16 inches of snow covered the Ohio Valley. Some rural highways were still closed by drifts up to 18 feet high in Nebraska and Kansas, where blizzards that struck one week ago and again over the weekend were believed to have killed thousands of cattle. On the East Coast, heavy rain brought flood warnings in Maine and Connecticut.
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