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NEWS
March 27, 1991 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a sale that many in this blue-collar city thought they would never see: Health-tex, the venerable children's apparel maker, was closing its Gadsden plant. Everything was on the auction block--sewing machines, mannequins, time clocks, even the cavernous yellow brick building itself. An auctioneer's cry sent a symbolic shiver throughout a region that long considered itself immune to economic trends that have ravaged and reshaped other parts of the country.
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NEWS
April 3, 2000 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mississippi curls through this farm town flat and broad, a dull blue-brown conveyor belt. Corn and soybeans glide south on rust-pocked barges. Coal and fertilizer slide past them, heading north. Folks here call it a working river. But is it doing its job? That question has exploded in recent weeks into furious controversy--and a potential criminal probe. The central issue: Should taxpayers invest in a $1.4-billion effort to speed commerce along the Mississippi?
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NEWS
August 3, 1999 | From Associated Press
With a yearlong drought showing no signs of letting up, federal officials on Monday declared West Virginia and parts of five neighboring states disaster areas. The damage was apparent here as Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman stood at the edge of a stunted cornfield producing sickly 3-inch ears. "Drought is like an insidious cancer," he said. "It's slow, it infects and it's harder to deal with as a disaster."
NEWS
August 3, 1999 | From Associated Press
With a yearlong drought showing no signs of letting up, federal officials on Monday declared West Virginia and parts of five neighboring states disaster areas. The damage was apparent here as Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman stood at the edge of a stunted cornfield producing sickly 3-inch ears. "Drought is like an insidious cancer," he said. "It's slow, it infects and it's harder to deal with as a disaster."
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fifth-generation tobacco grower, Rick Apple bristles when he is lumped in with cigarette companies in the public consciousness as a so-called merchant of death. "I've never forced a cigarette into anybody's mouth," said the farmer, taking a break from working the 250 acres he cultivates with his father and uncle. "I don't think any other farmer has either."
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | From Associated Press
The percentage of Southern children living in poverty is about the same as it was in 1969, even though most states in the region have robust economies and budget surpluses, the Children's Defense Fund said Monday. "Equally disturbing is the fact that the rest of the nation is catching up with the South," said Marian Wright Edelman, president of the defense fund, a Washington-based nonprofit child advocacy group. In 1996, the West matched the South in the percentage of poor children, 22.
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mississippi curls through this farm town flat and broad, a dull blue-brown conveyor belt. Corn and soybeans glide south on rust-pocked barges. Coal and fertilizer slide past them, heading north. Folks here call it a working river. But is it doing its job? That question has exploded in recent weeks into furious controversy--and a potential criminal probe. The central issue: Should taxpayers invest in a $1.4-billion effort to speed commerce along the Mississippi?
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This Sun Belt city, whose rapid growth and gleaming downtown made it a shining symbol of a surging South during the 1980s, has long been known for its can-do spirit. But municipal boosterism may have reached a peak earlier this year with the appearance of a series of billboards around town. "We've heard they're having a recession," declared the signs, which were designed and donated by a local billboard company. "We decided not to participate."
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sue Lobrano had expected to face a tough bunch of customers when she set out for a Rotary Club luncheon in the rural Mississippi Delta to drum up support for the International Ballet Competition. Although the competition, known as the "Olympics of Dance," is a world-class event and Jackson is the only city outside Europe honored as one of the four rotating host communities, Lobrano feared such distinctions would not mean much to the cotton planting and catfish farming Delta Rotarians.
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | From Associated Press
The percentage of Southern children living in poverty is about the same as it was in 1969, even though most states in the region have robust economies and budget surpluses, the Children's Defense Fund said Monday. "Equally disturbing is the fact that the rest of the nation is catching up with the South," said Marian Wright Edelman, president of the defense fund, a Washington-based nonprofit child advocacy group. In 1996, the West matched the South in the percentage of poor children, 22.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fifth-generation tobacco grower, Rick Apple bristles when he is lumped in with cigarette companies in the public consciousness as a so-called merchant of death. "I've never forced a cigarette into anybody's mouth," said the farmer, taking a break from working the 250 acres he cultivates with his father and uncle. "I don't think any other farmer has either."
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This Sun Belt city, whose rapid growth and gleaming downtown made it a shining symbol of a surging South during the 1980s, has long been known for its can-do spirit. But municipal boosterism may have reached a peak earlier this year with the appearance of a series of billboards around town. "We've heard they're having a recession," declared the signs, which were designed and donated by a local billboard company. "We decided not to participate."
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a sale that many in this blue-collar city thought they would never see: Health-tex, the venerable children's apparel maker, was closing its Gadsden plant. Everything was on the auction block--sewing machines, mannequins, time clocks, even the cavernous yellow brick building itself. An auctioneer's cry sent a symbolic shiver throughout a region that long considered itself immune to economic trends that have ravaged and reshaped other parts of the country.
NEWS
December 15, 1989 | DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sue Lobrano had expected to face a tough bunch of customers when she set out for a Rotary Club luncheon in the rural Mississippi Delta to drum up support for the International Ballet Competition. Although the competition, known as the "Olympics of Dance," is a world-class event and Jackson is the only city outside Europe honored as one of the four rotating host communities, Lobrano feared such distinctions would not mean much to the cotton planting and catfish farming Delta Rotarians.
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