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NEWS
August 27, 2000 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There isn't room for everyone who wants to see. The gallery can't hold more than a dozen people at a time, so the crowds who come each day to see the exhibit must wait. Today, one of the coldest days of the year, the wait is three hours, and still the line stretches down the block. The exhibit features 68 vivid photos of American lynchings. There is a photo of Frank Embree, a black man whipped across his legs and back and chest, then hanged.
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NEWS
August 27, 2000 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There isn't room for everyone who wants to see. The gallery can't hold more than a dozen people at a time, so the crowds who come each day to see the exhibit must wait. Today, one of the coldest days of the year, the wait is three hours, and still the line stretches down the block. The exhibit features 68 vivid photos of American lynchings. There is a photo of Frank Embree, a black man whipped across his legs and back and chest, then hanged.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY
The Hollywood types flew into Meridian, Miss., to soak up local color for their movie. Naturally, they had to meet Lawrence Rainey, the old-time sheriff. He always seemed to be in the action around Neshoba County.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black man considers the white. The white man considers the black. Both gazes questioning. Both gazes direct: Their steady stare a looking glass. But who is white and who is black if trajectories of blood deem you family? And how might one account for the space between? For Edward Ball, the politics of race seeped into his Southern consciousness like sun through a day-porch screen.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the names it has known: White liquor. White lightning. Stump liquor. Bootleg whiskey. Moonshine. 'Shine. For years, just a mention would glaze faces with nostalgia, conjuring up visions of fast-driving booze runners and of mountain men cooking illegal whiskey in crude but ingenious stills that, from time to time, got raided by hard-driving revenuers. But it's not just nostalgia anymore. The moonshiners apparently had dwindled, law enforcement officials say, but had never left completely.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside the tiny log building--a museum made from three slave cabins--dusty pieces of history testify mutely but powerfully. On the hearth sit iron pots and skillets that were used to cook white folks' meals, to make their tea. Hanging on the wall are a wooden rake and a "brush broom" that neated up their dirt yards. Look to the left, and a huge stone fireplace recalls long nights of bitter talk about hard times.
NEWS
August 9, 1992 | DUNCAN MANSFIELD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Rice Irwin knows all about life deep in the hollows of Appalachia. Others can learn about it, he reckons, by getting a look at Uncle Henry Moss's peg leg or the hog trough of Old Jim Smith, who lived his whole life in a cave. It's the stuff of these hardy folk that Irwin has collected, aided by a $345,000 MacArthur Foundation "genius grant" a few years ago.
NEWS
January 24, 1988
The Alabama state president of the NAACP will not be allowed to pull down the Confederate battle flag from atop the dome of the Alabama Capitol in Montgomery, Gov. Guy Hunt said. Hunt acknowledged that the flag stirs widely divergent emotions in many blacks and whites but said it will not be removed unless the Legislature authorizes such action. Thomas Reed, head of the Alabama National Assn.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON and EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than a century after the end of the Civil War, the governor of Georgia thinks it is time to lower the Confederate battle flag for good. Bowing to pressure from civil rights groups and others who called the emblem offensive and an embarrassment to the state, Gov. Zell Miller said Thursday he will introduce a measure when the Legislature convenes in January to change the Georgia flag, which currently incorporates the striking red and blue design of the Confederacy.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | HEIDI NOLTE BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
You can see it in their eyes--anger, hurt and frustration. The psychic scar of slavery marks each of the faces pictured in a display at the Museum of the Confederacy. "Before Freedom Came," an exhibit on American slave life, takes the visitor on a walk through courage, creativity and the triumph of the human spirit. The exhibition is described as the country's most comprehensive documentation of Southern black life in the days before the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln's proclamation of freedom.
NEWS
August 9, 1992 | DUNCAN MANSFIELD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
John Rice Irwin knows all about life deep in the hollows of Appalachia. Others can learn about it, he reckons, by getting a look at Uncle Henry Moss's peg leg or the hog trough of Old Jim Smith, who lived his whole life in a cave. It's the stuff of these hardy folk that Irwin has collected, aided by a $345,000 MacArthur Foundation "genius grant" a few years ago.
NEWS
May 29, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON and EDITH STANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than a century after the end of the Civil War, the governor of Georgia thinks it is time to lower the Confederate battle flag for good. Bowing to pressure from civil rights groups and others who called the emblem offensive and an embarrassment to the state, Gov. Zell Miller said Thursday he will introduce a measure when the Legislature convenes in January to change the Georgia flag, which currently incorporates the striking red and blue design of the Confederacy.
NEWS
February 26, 1992 | HEIDI NOLTE BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
You can see it in their eyes--anger, hurt and frustration. The psychic scar of slavery marks each of the faces pictured in a display at the Museum of the Confederacy. "Before Freedom Came," an exhibit on American slave life, takes the visitor on a walk through courage, creativity and the triumph of the human spirit. The exhibition is described as the country's most comprehensive documentation of Southern black life in the days before the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln's proclamation of freedom.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among the names it has known: White liquor. White lightning. Stump liquor. Bootleg whiskey. Moonshine. 'Shine. For years, just a mention would glaze faces with nostalgia, conjuring up visions of fast-driving booze runners and of mountain men cooking illegal whiskey in crude but ingenious stills that, from time to time, got raided by hard-driving revenuers. But it's not just nostalgia anymore. The moonshiners apparently had dwindled, law enforcement officials say, but had never left completely.
NEWS
February 26, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside the tiny log building--a museum made from three slave cabins--dusty pieces of history testify mutely but powerfully. On the hearth sit iron pots and skillets that were used to cook white folks' meals, to make their tea. Hanging on the wall are a wooden rake and a "brush broom" that neated up their dirt yards. Look to the left, and a huge stone fireplace recalls long nights of bitter talk about hard times.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY
The Hollywood types flew into Meridian, Miss., to soak up local color for their movie. Naturally, they had to meet Lawrence Rainey, the old-time sheriff. He always seemed to be in the action around Neshoba County.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
As navies go, the Navy of Confederate States of America was short-lived. But its impact was felt in many ways. With 130 ships, two admirals, and a few hundred officers--most of them former U.S. Navy men--it lasted only four years. And with only 5,000 sailors, the Navy of Confederate States was vastly outnumbered by a Northern fleet of 700 ships and 20,000 sailors. Yet the Southern navy made its mark. The 40-foot CSS Horace L.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The black man considers the white. The white man considers the black. Both gazes questioning. Both gazes direct: Their steady stare a looking glass. But who is white and who is black if trajectories of blood deem you family? And how might one account for the space between? For Edward Ball, the politics of race seeped into his Southern consciousness like sun through a day-porch screen.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
As navies go, the Navy of Confederate States of America was short-lived. But its impact was felt in many ways. With 130 ships, two admirals, and a few hundred officers--most of them former U.S. Navy men--it lasted only four years. And with only 5,000 sailors, the Navy of Confederate States was vastly outnumbered by a Northern fleet of 700 ships and 20,000 sailors. Yet the Southern navy made its mark. The 40-foot CSS Horace L.
NEWS
January 24, 1988
The Alabama state president of the NAACP will not be allowed to pull down the Confederate battle flag from atop the dome of the Alabama Capitol in Montgomery, Gov. Guy Hunt said. Hunt acknowledged that the flag stirs widely divergent emotions in many blacks and whites but said it will not be removed unless the Legislature authorizes such action. Thomas Reed, head of the Alabama National Assn.
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