Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSouthern United States Politics
IN THE NEWS

Southern United States Politics

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The leadership lineup for the new Republican Congress dramatically underscores the shift in the party's geographic and philosophic center of gravity toward the South. The election Friday of Mississippi Sen. Trent Lott to the No. 2 leadership position in the Senate cements the influence of an emerging Southern axis that includes incoming House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia, incoming House Majority Leader Dick Armey of Texas, and Texas Sen. Phil Gramm.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
It was jambalaya, alligator-on-a-stick, and young mothers with babies on their hip two-stepping to blistering Cajun music from hometown hero Wayne Toups at the 60th International Rice Festival here. And then, the way they like it in Louisiana, there was time for just a taste of politics during the parade.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | From Times staff writers
EYES ON DIXIE: Although the New Hampshire primary on Feb. 18 may determine the staying power of Patrick J. Buchanan's challenge to President Bush's renomination, aides to the conservative commentator reject the notion that he has committed all his resources to that New England battleground. . . . To prove the point, this week they plan to unveil campaign organizations in four Southern states--complete with paid staffs and phone banks. The states are Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Oklahoma.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Republicans ready to anoint a Southerner to succeed Bob Dole as Senate leader, Congress is arriving at a watershed in the shifting terrain of American politics.
NEWS
October 30, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week before Election Day, the Deep South is caught in a struggle between its racist past and its present quest to be truly "new." In Alabama, for example, the issue of race is so pungent that the incumbent white Republican governor only needed to run pictures of his white Democratic challenger sitting in a car with a black man to bring charges of racism.
NEWS
November 18, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
As a force in statewide Louisiana politics, former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke's influence may have crested with Saturday's landslide gubernatorial defeat. But his role on the national stage could be just beginning. With his jagged message of white middle-class resentment, Duke has emerged from this election as a national figure--a fulcrum in the politics of race. Duke's hopes of ever winning statewide office in Louisiana appear bleak after Saturday's commanding victory by Democrat Edwin W.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Linda Hatch reads the polls for several Southern states, she notices her favorite Democratic presidential candidate trailing. When she hears others talk about whom they are supporting, as often as not it is Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton they are discussing. Hatch, a financial planner in Austin, Tex., and a supporter of Nebraska Sen.
NEWS
June 19, 1995 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
To add injury to the insult of last November's election results, which relegated her to the unaccustomed role of minority member of the Wake County Board of Commissioners, Democratic incumbent Betty Lou Ward then had to undergo foot surgery, leaving her on crutches. "But what I should have said to people," she told a party gathering here earlier this month "was that I got stepped on by an elephant." She wasn't the only one.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The two leading candidates who stayed away provoked the sharpest words from the six contenders who turned out here Saturday for the first Republican presidential debate of 1996. As expected, several of the candidates accused the most prominent no-show, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas, of capitulating to President Clinton in the deal that will allow the federal government to reopen.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Republicans ready to anoint a Southerner to succeed Bob Dole as Senate leader, Congress is arriving at a watershed in the shifting terrain of American politics.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The two leading candidates who stayed away provoked the sharpest words from the six contenders who turned out here Saturday for the first Republican presidential debate of 1996. As expected, several of the candidates accused the most prominent no-show, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas, of capitulating to President Clinton in the deal that will allow the federal government to reopen.
NEWS
June 19, 1995 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
To add injury to the insult of last November's election results, which relegated her to the unaccustomed role of minority member of the Wake County Board of Commissioners, Democratic incumbent Betty Lou Ward then had to undergo foot surgery, leaving her on crutches. "But what I should have said to people," she told a party gathering here earlier this month "was that I got stepped on by an elephant." She wasn't the only one.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
The leadership lineup for the new Republican Congress dramatically underscores the shift in the party's geographic and philosophic center of gravity toward the South. The election Friday of Mississippi Sen. Trent Lott to the No. 2 leadership position in the Senate cements the influence of an emerging Southern axis that includes incoming House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia, incoming House Majority Leader Dick Armey of Texas, and Texas Sen. Phil Gramm.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
In Louisiana, a Republican official complains that the religious right "is tearing the party asunder" and jeopardizing President Bush's chances of carrying the state in November. In Alabama and Georgia, campaign volunteers for former independent candidate Ross Perot have rejected overtures from the Bush campaign and some say they've decided to support Democratic nominee Bill Clinton.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | From Times staff writers
EYES ON DIXIE: Although the New Hampshire primary on Feb. 18 may determine the staying power of Patrick J. Buchanan's challenge to President Bush's renomination, aides to the conservative commentator reject the notion that he has committed all his resources to that New England battleground. . . . To prove the point, this week they plan to unveil campaign organizations in four Southern states--complete with paid staffs and phone banks. The states are Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi and Oklahoma.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Linda Hatch reads the polls for several Southern states, she notices her favorite Democratic presidential candidate trailing. When she hears others talk about whom they are supporting, as often as not it is Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton they are discussing. Hatch, a financial planner in Austin, Tex., and a supporter of Nebraska Sen.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
In Louisiana, a Republican official complains that the religious right "is tearing the party asunder" and jeopardizing President Bush's chances of carrying the state in November. In Alabama and Georgia, campaign volunteers for former independent candidate Ross Perot have rejected overtures from the Bush campaign and some say they've decided to support Democratic nominee Bill Clinton.
NEWS
November 18, 1991 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
As a force in statewide Louisiana politics, former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke's influence may have crested with Saturday's landslide gubernatorial defeat. But his role on the national stage could be just beginning. With his jagged message of white middle-class resentment, Duke has emerged from this election as a national figure--a fulcrum in the politics of race. Duke's hopes of ever winning statewide office in Louisiana appear bleak after Saturday's commanding victory by Democrat Edwin W.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|