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August 31, 1999 | Associated Press
Education Secretary Richard W. Riley began a five-day, five-state bus trip Monday to visit schools in the South. "The South has made enormous strides in education, and we have economic prosperity to show for it," Riley told a cheering crowd gathered at the airport here. Riley, whose first-time bus tour is to include a stop in South Carolina, where he once was governor, said the South has emerged as a national trendsetter. "Many more children are in Head Start.
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NEWS
August 31, 1999 | Associated Press
Education Secretary Richard W. Riley began a five-day, five-state bus trip Monday to visit schools in the South. "The South has made enormous strides in education, and we have economic prosperity to show for it," Riley told a cheering crowd gathered at the airport here. Riley, whose first-time bus tour is to include a stop in South Carolina, where he once was governor, said the South has emerged as a national trendsetter. "Many more children are in Head Start.
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NEWS
January 29, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite evidence of increased racial tensions across the nation, black and white Americans still support the concept of a racially mixed society, especially integrated schools, according to a recent study. This support has survived for 20 years, the study found, even though some segments of American society actually have become more segregated and political leaders have become increasingly reluctant to openly encourage desegregation of schools, neighborhoods and workplaces.
NEWS
January 29, 1992 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite evidence of increased racial tensions across the nation, black and white Americans still support the concept of a racially mixed society, especially integrated schools, according to a recent study. This support has survived for 20 years, the study found, even though some segments of American society actually have become more segregated and political leaders have become increasingly reluctant to openly encourage desegregation of schools, neighborhoods and workplaces.
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