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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1993
We congratulate Mayor Richard Riordan for speaking out in support of the Southwest Museum maintaining its present historic site at the 1914 National Registry-available building ("Mayor: City Committed to Museum," Nov. 24). The coalition of groups that make up Save Our Southwest Museum has been and will continue to work with the museum to find positive solutions to museum concerns. This landmark site--and only this site--can speak to the history and culture of the City of Los Angeles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
November 29, 2013
Re "Revive the Southwest Museum," Editorial, Nov. 25 I am deeply disturbed by the Autry National Center's management of the Southwest Museum. Instead of returning the Southwest Museum to its former glory and mission, the Autry is treating it as if it were a resource. The Southwest Museum deserves to remain a little gem. Its building is a unique treasure, an echo of old Los Angeles. As a second-generation Angeleno whose family has been here since 1900, I remember first going there in the fourth grade and having a great learning experience.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Los Angeles' oldest museum site, the Natural History Museum in Exposition Park, is celebrating its centennial this year with the debut of a new entrance halland outdoor nature center, capping a full makeover that's already yielded new halls for dinosaurs and mammals, and the return of the museum's core domed 1913 building to its original glory. But will there be any reason for festivities surrounding next year's centennial of the Southwest Museum building in Mount Washington? For the past ten years, the castle-like, hilltop structure has been like a very old aunt whose care is a strain on the family, with different factions fighting over what should be done, and who should pay. Legally, the Southwest is the obligation of the Autry National Center of the American West.
OPINION
November 25, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The Southwest Museum, which sits on a hilltop in Mount Washington, is the oldest museum in Los Angeles, a historic landmark, a testament to longevity in a town without much of that. For decades, it housed and displayed objects from a world-class collection of Native American and Latin American artifacts. But age - the museum will be 100 years old next year - along with the Northridge earthquake and financial troubles took their toll. In 2003, the museum officially merged with the larger Autry Museum of Western Heritage, which is located in Griffith Park and was founded in 1988 by its namesake, the Hollywood cowboy Gene Autry, the Western actor Monte Hale and their wives.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1997
The Southwest Museum is looking for volunteers to assist chief curator Kathleen Whitaker research and take inventory of the museum's collection of Navajo textiles. Volunteers must be familiar with the software program WordPerfect, on which the records will be complied. Information collected will be included in a book Whitaker is writing on the collection. Interested volunteers should contact Whitaker directly at (213) ""!+"!--$, Ext. 224.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tally and Bill Mingst bought a Southwestern suede purse with tin dangles to showcase on the wall of their Wyoming ranch house. Joyce Evans purchased a Pima basket woven with a black eagle. David and Holly Davos were high bidders on the old Hopi kachina. And Darrell and Lang Veloris happily carted away Indian prints. Auction bidders seemed, in fact, to be in a rather generous mood the other evening at Southwest Museum's Mountain Spirit Gala.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2009 | Bob Pool
It could have been a scene right out of a Gene Autry horse opera -- a cowboys-versus-Indians-style faceoff, potshots being fired by both sides, a hero riding to the rescue in the final reel. That seems to be the plot line of the drama that is playing out between backers of the Autry National Center of the American West in Griffith Park and those of the Southwest Museum a few miles away in Mount Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1993
Oxnard has entered a crowded field of communities trying to lure the Southwest Museum, and its potential 300,000 visitors a year, from Los Angeles. Council members on Tuesday signed a letter asking the museum's directors to consider moving to the Oxnard Town Center, arguing that the center's location near the junction of the Ventura Freeway and the Pacific Coast Highway made it a particularly attractive site.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1988 | ESTHER SCHRADER, Times Staff Writer
Amid continuing uncertainty over the financial future of the Southwest Museum in Mount Washington, the museum's board president, Dr. Norman Sprague, stepped down earlier this week. At the board's annual meeting, Sprague turned over the presidency of the museum's 33-member board to Wells Fargo Bank director James Dickason, a member of the board for 24 years. Five new board members were also announced at the meeting. Among them were John Gavin, former U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The pace is picking up on the massive conservation project in process at the Southwest Museum in Mount Washington. The end is almost in sight: Only 36,000 objects to go! In 2003, when the poverty-stricken institution merged with the more affluent Museum of the American West under the umbrella of the Autry National Center in Griffith Park, the first priority was to save the Southwest's collection of about 250,000 Native American artworks and artifacts. Second only to the holdings of the National Museum of the American Indian inWashington, D.C., the collection had been inadequately housed for decades and further damaged by earthquakes, water and insects.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Los Angeles' oldest museum site, the Natural History Museum in Exposition Park, is celebrating its centennial this year with the debut of a new entrance halland outdoor nature center, capping a full makeover that's already yielded new halls for dinosaurs and mammals, and the return of the museum's core domed 1913 building to its original glory. But will there be any reason for festivities surrounding next year's centennial of the Southwest Museum building in Mount Washington? For the past ten years, the castle-like, hilltop structure has been like a very old aunt whose care is a strain on the family, with different factions fighting over what should be done, and who should pay. Legally, the Southwest is the obligation of the Autry National Center of the American West.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2012 | By David Ng
Daniel Finley, the president and chief executive of the Autry National Museum, has abruptly stepped down from the institution after just two years on the job. The Autry said Thursday that it had named W. Richard West Jr. as its new president and CEO. West's appointment will take effect in the fall of 2012, with an exact date to be announced later, according to a spokeswoman for the Autry.   Finley took the top position at the Autry in 2010, coming from the Milwaukee Public Museum. He has been succeeded on an interim basis by Luke Swetland, the museum's head of exhibitions and operations, according to the Autry spokeswoman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
One of Los Angeles' longest-running and most adversarial cultural disputes - over the future of the Southwest Museum in Mount Washington, and its prized collection of Native American artifacts - has a chance of shifting to a less contentious footing. Supporters of the Southwest Museum have been trying for years to force its stepparent, the Autry National Center of the American West, to revive the castle-like, 98-year-old site as a vibrant showcase for the collection. Meanwhile, they have tried to block the Autry from shifting Native American exhibits to the Autry Museum in Griffith Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2012 | By Mike Boehm
This Sunday's annual Lummis Day festival, celebrating the history and culture of northeast L.A., calls to mind a time 100 years ago when the city was extremely pregnant with its first major, home-grown cultural institutions, but they had not yet quite been born. In its edition of June 16, 1912, the Los Angeles Times bannered the news that Charles F. Lummis and fellow members of the Southwest Society had paid $50,000 to secure a 17-acre property atop a bluff in Mount Washington for a museum to house Lummis' extraordinary collection of Native American artifacts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The pace is picking up on the massive conservation project in process at the Southwest Museum in Mount Washington. The end is almost in sight: Only 36,000 objects to go! In 2003, when the poverty-stricken institution merged with the more affluent Museum of the American West under the umbrella of the Autry National Center in Griffith Park, the first priority was to save the Southwest's collection of about 250,000 Native American artworks and artifacts. Second only to the holdings of the National Museum of the American Indian inWashington, D.C., the collection had been inadequately housed for decades and further damaged by earthquakes, water and insects.
HEALTH
April 28, 2012 | By Charles Fleming, Los Angeles Times
SOUTHWEST MUSEUM / ELDRED STAIRS You don't have to fight the crowds in Santa Monica Canyon to get a great stairway workout. You can hike the historic wooden Eldred stairs in Highland Park and get great city and mountain views in the bargain. Duration: One hour Distance: 2.6 miles Difficulty: 3 on a 1-5 scale Transportation: Gold Line, Southwest Museum Station; Metro bus No. 81 1. Start from Figueroa Street and Woodside Drive. Climb the stairs to the elevated sidewalk, and pass Casa de Adobe and some fine Craftsman homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1992
The Southwest Museum will hold a folk art sale on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. featuring items by Latino artists. Artists featured in the sale include Peter Tovar (jewelry and papel picado ), Ofelia and Xavier Exparza (altars), Virgil Inigues (dolls), Linda Gamboa (jewelry), Rosalie Ortega (painted gourds), Richard and Margaret Beltran (mixed-media) and Joe Dias (woodcarvings). Information: (213) 221-2164.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2011
Years of wrangling over whether the Autry National Center has a right to shed a costly and inconvenient subsidiary, the Southwest Museum, has spilled into the courts. Southwest backers are asking a Los Angeles Superior Court judge to overturn two recent decisions by Los Angeles city officials allowing the Autry to undertake what it has characterized as a routine gallery renovation at its Griffith Park museum but which opponents say would be the first step in an irreversible sequence that would end the Southwest's nearly 100-year run in Mount Washington as the home of a prized collection of Native American artifacts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Somewhere up there in California heaven, Charles Fletcher Lummis is not a happy man. A journalist and an obsessive collector of all things Western, Lummis was a pioneer L.A. historian who defended the cultural heritage of our state and region against those who would insult, ignore or steal it. He founded the city's first museum and built its first important museum building in 1914. And today, his Southwest Museum still rises like a castle on a hillside overlooking Lummis' favorite corner of the city, the Arroyo Seco.
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