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Southwest Voter Registration And Education Project

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1997
"You need to have a voice, so you need to vote." NAME: Isai Perez AGE: 26 HOME: Pacoima PROFESSION: Valley coordinator, Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project. LATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT: With the help of other coordinators from the Southwest Project, Perez opened an office in Reseda to help launch an effort in the San Fernando Valley to register 35,000 Latinos to vote. He spends most of his days in high schools, colleges and churches throughout the Valley urging Latinos to register.
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NEWS
March 15, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen-year-old Marisela Rodriguez has been frustrated lately, but not with typical teenage complaints of homework, peer pressure and curfews. A dedicated volunteer in the San Fernando Valley's largest voter-registration drive, Rodriguez is upset by the apathy of some Latinos who don't vote. "We want to get them motivated and show them that if they vote, things can change," Rodriguez said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nonprofit group has launched a drive to register 35,000 Latino voters in the San Fernando Valley, an effort that--if successful--could significantly reshape the area's political landscape. To achieve its goal, the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project is relying on some unusual tactics, such as appealing to potential voters at high schools and community colleges and in churches with large Latino congregations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1997
"You need to have a voice, so you need to vote." NAME: Isai Perez AGE: 26 HOME: Pacoima PROFESSION: Valley coordinator, Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project. LATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT: With the help of other coordinators from the Southwest Project, Perez opened an office in Reseda to help launch an effort in the San Fernando Valley to register 35,000 Latinos to vote. He spends most of his days in high schools, colleges and churches throughout the Valley urging Latinos to register.
NEWS
March 15, 1998 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen-year-old Marisela Rodriguez has been frustrated lately, but not with typical teenage complaints of homework, peer pressure and curfews. A dedicated volunteer in the San Fernando Valley's largest voter-registration drive, Rodriguez is upset by the apathy of some Latinos who don't vote. "We want to get them motivated and show them that if they vote, things can change," Rodriguez said.
NEWS
February 8, 1990
Construction work has begun for an outdoor stage and band shell at Plaza de La Raza, the Latino cultural arts center in East Los Angeles. The future amphitheater, which will seat 350 people, will bear the name of the late Willie Velasquez, who founded the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project. The theater should be completed by mid-March, said Gema Sandoval, executive director of Plaza de La Raza.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1997 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When the votes started trickling in last November, and the enormity of it all became clear, those who had long labored in the Latino community's political fields could only grow giddy with joy. For the first time in 20 years, there was little whining about the paltry turnout of Latino voters--this time, things had been different, thank God and Gov. Pete Wilson, not necessarily in that order.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1988
Linda Chavez cautions Democratic presidential nominee Michael Dukakis that speaking Spanish on the campaign trail may somehow cause Latinos to abandon their commitment to learn English ("Is Spanish Wrong Signal to Latinos?" Op-Ed Page, Aug. 8). In fact, there is simply no debate that mastery of the English language is key to academic and economic success in America. By her own statistics, Chavez demonstrates that her concerns are nothing but a straw man useful for pushing her own agenda as president of U.S. English: 95% of native born Mexican-Americans know English, a majority of second generation Mexican-Americans know English, a majority of second generation Mexican-Americans speak only English, and thousands of more recent immigrants are waiting for the classes that will teach them English.
NEWS
May 31, 1996 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. and Mexican governors representing 10 states that front the international border gathered here Thursday with delicate hopes of easing a tense time in their relations. Participants at this 14th assembly of the Border Governors Conference have a powerful incentive to forge new bonds that might take advantage of Mexico's improving economy and the potential benefits of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement.
NEWS
November 17, 1992 | GEBE MARTINEZ and RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hoping to flex their political muscle in an unprecedented united front, about 60 Latino leaders gathered for a closed-door meeting in Dallas on Monday to press for more appointments to President-elect Bill Clinton's transition team and Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nonprofit group has launched a drive to register 35,000 Latino voters in the San Fernando Valley, an effort that--if successful--could significantly reshape the area's political landscape. To achieve its goal, the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project is relying on some unusual tactics, such as appealing to potential voters at high schools and community colleges and in churches with large Latino congregations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1988
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals broke no new legal ground on Wednesday when it handed down a ruling that makes it easier for minority groups to challenge at-large elections for local government bodies in California. But the decision is important because, if fully implemented, it should stimulate greater voter participation by minorities, especially Latinos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, the Southwest Voter Registration and Education Project launched an ambitious campaign to add 30,000 Latino voters to the rolls in the San Fernando Valley. They were able to register about 10,000 Latinos by the time the project ran out of money and closed its Reseda office. But now the Southwest group is making another run at Latinos in the Valley, this time planning to open five offices with the goal of registering 6,000 to 10,000 voters.
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