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Southwestern Law School

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BUSINESS
November 25, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Southwestern Law School, which occupies one of Los Angeles' most famous buildings, has announced plans to expand its quarters with construction of student housing. The move marks a breakthrough in the evolution of the century-old institution into a law school with an authentic 24-hour campus, officials said. Southwestern expects to start work in December on a $20-million project to create 133 apartments, an outdoor courtyard and underground parking next to the school's two main buildings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
If you stand on the corner of 4th and Spring streets in downtown, it's possible to view sections of at least 12 buildings designed by John Parkinson: the Los Angeles Theatre Center (formerly Security National Bank), the Title Insurance building and the city's first palatial hotel, the Spanish Renaissance-style Alexandria Hotel, to name a few. Oddly, the architect's name is not widely known, but his landmark structures - Los Angeles City Hall, Union Station, the L.A. Memorial Coliseum and Bullocks Wilshire - have defined the city's skyline since the early 20th century.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2009
David C. Kohler Attorney, law school professor David C. Kohler, 56, director of the entertainment and media law institute at Southwestern Law School, died of cancer Oct. 15 at the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center in Los Angeles, the law school announced. Kohler, who also was a law professor, came to the institute in 2003 after more than 25 years as a media attorney, including nearly a decade with TBS and CNN. He joined Turner Broadcasting System in 1991 and served as assistant vice president and deputy general counsel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2013 | By Jason Song
Two Los Angeles law schools are launching programs designed to give their students real-world legal experience by writing briefs on behalf of nonprofit groups or other causes that professors deem worthy. Unlike better-known programs in which law students take on longer-term pro bono work that focuses on single cases, students at UCLA and Southwestern law schools will write amicus briefs, often known as "friend of the court" documents. "I have not heard of law schools doing anything quite like this," said Eugene Volokh, a UCLA law professor who will head the university's First Amendment Amicus Brief Clinic this fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2013 | By Liesl Bradner
If you stand on the corner of 4th and Spring streets in downtown, it's possible to view sections of at least 12 buildings designed by John Parkinson: the Los Angeles Theatre Center (formerly Security National Bank), the Title Insurance building and the city's first palatial hotel, the Spanish Renaissance-style Alexandria Hotel, to name a few. Oddly, the architect's name is not widely known, but his landmark structures - Los Angeles City Hall, Union Station, the L.A. Memorial Coliseum and Bullocks Wilshire - have defined the city's skyline since the early 20th century.
OPINION
April 4, 2013
Re "A thin jobs docket for law grads," April 2 Thank you for shedding light on what has become a pervasive issue among recent law school graduates like myself. As a fellow Southwestern Law School alumnus, I sympathize with Michael D. Lieberman's plight, as I too was greeted with unemployment after graduating and passing the bar exam. At issue here is Southwestern's lack of empathy regarding its recent graduates. Startlingly, Southwestern's only communication with me since graduation has been in the form of letters and calls seeking donations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Michael D. Lieberman decided to enroll at Southwestern Law School after reading that 97% of its graduates were employed within nine months. He graduated in 2009, passed the bar on his first try but could not find a job as a lawyer. He worked for a while as a software tester, then a technical writer, and now serves as a field representative for an elected official. Lieberman, who earned his undergraduate degree at UC San Diego, is one of dozens of law graduates across the country who have joined class-action lawsuits, alleging that law schools lured them in with misleading reports of their graduates' success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dozens of law graduates across the nation have joined class-action lawsuits alleging that law schools lured them in with misleading reports of their graduates' success. Instead of working in the law, some of the graduates were toiling at hourly jobs in department stores and restaurants and struggling to pay back more than $100,000 in loans used to finance their education. Others were in temporary or part-time legal positions. Michael D. Lieberman decided to enroll at Southwestern Law School after reading that 97% of its graduates were employed within nine months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former lingerie room of green and gold columns now holds the international lawbook collection. Tax volumes are in the old beauty salon. California statutes line shelves where men's pricey suits and sweaters were sold. And the reference desks stand in sportswear, beneath the spectacular abstract mural that once helped elevate department store shopping into an artistic experience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2013 | By Jason Song
Two Los Angeles law schools are launching programs designed to give their students real-world legal experience by writing briefs on behalf of nonprofit groups or other causes that professors deem worthy. Unlike better-known programs in which law students take on longer-term pro bono work that focuses on single cases, students at UCLA and Southwestern law schools will write amicus briefs, often known as "friend of the court" documents. "I have not heard of law schools doing anything quite like this," said Eugene Volokh, a UCLA law professor who will head the university's First Amendment Amicus Brief Clinic this fall.
OPINION
April 4, 2013
Re "A thin jobs docket for law grads," April 2 Thank you for shedding light on what has become a pervasive issue among recent law school graduates like myself. As a fellow Southwestern Law School alumnus, I sympathize with Michael D. Lieberman's plight, as I too was greeted with unemployment after graduating and passing the bar exam. At issue here is Southwestern's lack of empathy regarding its recent graduates. Startlingly, Southwestern's only communication with me since graduation has been in the form of letters and calls seeking donations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Dozens of law graduates across the nation have joined class-action lawsuits alleging that law schools lured them in with misleading reports of their graduates' success. Instead of working in the law, some of the graduates were toiling at hourly jobs in department stores and restaurants and struggling to pay back more than $100,000 in loans used to finance their education. Others were in temporary or part-time legal positions. Michael D. Lieberman decided to enroll at Southwestern Law School after reading that 97% of its graduates were employed within nine months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - Michael D. Lieberman decided to enroll at Southwestern Law School after reading that 97% of its graduates were employed within nine months. He graduated in 2009, passed the bar on his first try but could not find a job as a lawyer. He worked for a while as a software tester, then a technical writer, and now serves as a field representative for an elected official. Lieberman, who earned his undergraduate degree at UC San Diego, is one of dozens of law graduates across the country who have joined class-action lawsuits, alleging that law schools lured them in with misleading reports of their graduates' success.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Southwestern Law School, which occupies one of Los Angeles' most famous buildings, has announced plans to expand its quarters with construction of student housing. The move marks a breakthrough in the evolution of the century-old institution into a law school with an authentic 24-hour campus, officials said. Southwestern expects to start work in December on a $20-million project to create 133 apartments, an outdoor courtyard and underground parking next to the school's two main buildings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
David C. Kohler, 56, director of the entertainment and media law institute at Southwestern Law School, died of cancer Oct. 15 at the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center in Los Angeles, the law school announced. Kohler, who also was a law professor, came to the institute in 2003 after more than 25 years as a media attorney, including nearly a decade with TBS and CNN. He joined Turner Broadcasting System in 1991 and served as assistant vice president and deputy general counsel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1997 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former lingerie room of green and gold columns now holds the international lawbook collection. Tax volumes are in the old beauty salon. California statutes line shelves where men's pricey suits and sweaters were sold. And the reference desks stand in sportswear, beneath the spectacular abstract mural that once helped elevate department store shopping into an artistic experience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000
Dick R. Linch, 87, a management consultant who became a dedicated Glendale community leader and advocate for senior citizens. A native of Lincoln, Neb., Linch studied at Pasadena City College and Southwestern Law School, earning degrees in business administration, accounting and engineering. In 1981, Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich appointed him to the county's Productivity Advisory Committee, on which he served as vice chairman.
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