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November 26, 1989 | Raymund A. Paredes, Paredes is associate vice chancellor of academic development at UCLA and the author of "The Evolution of Chicano Literature" (Arundel Press). and
Americans have customarily both underestimated and undervalued the presence of Mexican culture in the United States. The origins of this phenomenon run deep in American history, traceable to the fusion of hispanophobia, anti-Catholicism and contempt for New World aboriginal life and culture in the late 18th Century.
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NATIONAL
May 4, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - Climate change may increase the risk of extreme rainfall in the tropics and drought in the world's temperate zones, according to a new study led by NASA. "These results in many ways are the worst of all possible worlds," said Peter Gleick, a climatologist and water expert who is president of the Pacific Institute, an Oakland research organization. "Wet areas will get wetter and dry areas will get drier. " The regions that could get the heaviest rainfall are along the equator, mainly over the Pacific Ocean and the Asian tropics.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Zanabria recalls the day in October when technicians came to install a telephone in her home in this small village, a place so sleepy that herds of goats blithely wander the unpaved streets. "I said to them that if I had to pay anything for the phone, I didn't want it," the 48-year-old grandmother recalled, "because I can't afford such luxuries." In fact, the bill is being paid by her son Gilberto Gonzalez, who migrated to Tucson eight years ago.
SCIENCE
February 3, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Turkeys, the only domesticated animals from the New World that are now used globally, were actually domesticated twice -- once in Mesoamerica as was previously believed and once in what is now the southwestern United States. The new findings, reported this week by Canadian and American researchers in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, come from a DNA analysis of ancient turkey bones and coprolites, the polite name for fossilized excrement. Surprisingly, the researchers found that both strains of domesticated turkeys are now extinct, replaced by more highly inbred strains.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was a time when all there was of the Pacific Southwest were a few volcanic peaks sticking up out of the ocean just a few miles from this modern desert city. The Earth was already half its current age of about 4.6 billion years when those island mountains first appeared, but they were the beginning of the Pacific Southwest.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The wildfire danger will be higher than usual this spring across the Southwest, much of the Plains and parts of the South, the government warned. Wildfires have already ravaged broad areas of Texas and Oklahoma this winter. In its annual spring weather outlook, the National Weather Service said severe drought and above-normal temperatures across the region were expected to persist.
NATIONAL
August 12, 2004 | Mark Z. Barabak and Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writers
President Bush trolled for Latino votes and Sen. John F. Kerry campaigned for the support of senior citizens Wednesday, as the two played a game of political leapfrog across the Southwest and into Southern California. Bush, campaigning in Albuquerque, pitched his policies on small business and homeownership to a few hundred supporters in the hangar of a private aviation firm.
TRAVEL
July 22, 2007 | KEN VAN VECHTEN, Special to The Times
The key to surviving the desert in summer is keeping a close eye on the thermometer: the higher the temperature, the lower the resort prices. So who couldn't thrive in a resort's cool indoor climes at half the usual cost? With the sun high and days long, money-wise (and SPF-savvy) travelers mine the deserts of California and the Southwest for deeply discounted room rates. -- THE PLACES -- Gold Canyon Golf Resort 6100 S. Kings Ranch Road, Gold Canyon, Ariz. (800) 624-6445, www.gcgr.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | LEO BANKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Winn Bundy is telling a story about the bobcat that visited her bookshop and tried to eat her house cat, Captain Midnight. It seems that darkness had fallen over the Singing Wind Ranch, a lonesome parcel of desert 40 miles southeast of Tucson. On this cruel and beautiful landscape, beneath soaring hawks and scavenging turkey buzzards, amid a quiet so long nothing could break it--except for the chica-chica-chica of rattlers in the grass--Bundy runs a bookshop.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out in the New Mexico desert, rows of man-made adobe walls lined up like tombstones are being treated with chemicals and soaked with water. Not far away, remnants of a 19th-Century adobe fort sit under a canopy of fabric specially color-coordinated to blend in with the Southwestern landscape. These simple structures at Ft.
TRAVEL
July 22, 2007 | KEN VAN VECHTEN, Special to The Times
The key to surviving the desert in summer is keeping a close eye on the thermometer: the higher the temperature, the lower the resort prices. So who couldn't thrive in a resort's cool indoor climes at half the usual cost? With the sun high and days long, money-wise (and SPF-savvy) travelers mine the deserts of California and the Southwest for deeply discounted room rates. -- THE PLACES -- Gold Canyon Golf Resort 6100 S. Kings Ranch Road, Gold Canyon, Ariz. (800) 624-6445, www.gcgr.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Thirty-eight jobs will be cut from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuges in the Southwest region over the next three years, the agency announced Thursday. The Wilderness Society immediately criticized the cuts, saying that refuge staffing has been dropping for the last two years, and that the newest cuts will mean a decrease of 20% more. The Southwest region is made up of 45 refuges in Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas with 2.86 million acres of habitat.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The wildfire danger will be higher than usual this spring across the Southwest, much of the Plains and parts of the South, the government warned. Wildfires have already ravaged broad areas of Texas and Oklahoma this winter. In its annual spring weather outlook, the National Weather Service said severe drought and above-normal temperatures across the region were expected to persist.
NATIONAL
August 12, 2004 | Mark Z. Barabak and Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writers
President Bush trolled for Latino votes and Sen. John F. Kerry campaigned for the support of senior citizens Wednesday, as the two played a game of political leapfrog across the Southwest and into Southern California. Bush, campaigning in Albuquerque, pitched his policies on small business and homeownership to a few hundred supporters in the hangar of a private aviation firm.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Zanabria recalls the day in October when technicians came to install a telephone in her home in this small village, a place so sleepy that herds of goats blithely wander the unpaved streets. "I said to them that if I had to pay anything for the phone, I didn't want it," the 48-year-old grandmother recalled, "because I can't afford such luxuries." In fact, the bill is being paid by her son Gilberto Gonzalez, who migrated to Tucson eight years ago.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was a time when all there was of the Pacific Southwest were a few volcanic peaks sticking up out of the ocean just a few miles from this modern desert city. The Earth was already half its current age of about 4.6 billion years when those island mountains first appeared, but they were the beginning of the Pacific Southwest.
NEWS
December 30, 1988 | BOB SIPCHEN
Of all the coffee-table books circulating this season, photographer Marc Gaede's "Bordertowns" was probably among the least pleasant to unwrap on Christmas morning. A beautifully produced book, it's filled with sad and brutal images: of a young American Indian frozen dead in the ice, of Indians knifed in barroom brawls, of entangled drunken bodies in a huge drunk tank.
NATIONAL
March 9, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Thirty-eight jobs will be cut from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuges in the Southwest region over the next three years, the agency announced Thursday. The Wilderness Society immediately criticized the cuts, saying that refuge staffing has been dropping for the last two years, and that the newest cuts will mean a decrease of 20% more. The Southwest region is made up of 45 refuges in Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas with 2.86 million acres of habitat.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | LEO BANKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Winn Bundy is telling a story about the bobcat that visited her bookshop and tried to eat her house cat, Captain Midnight. It seems that darkness had fallen over the Singing Wind Ranch, a lonesome parcel of desert 40 miles southeast of Tucson. On this cruel and beautiful landscape, beneath soaring hawks and scavenging turkey buzzards, amid a quiet so long nothing could break it--except for the chica-chica-chica of rattlers in the grass--Bundy runs a bookshop.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | MICHAEL S. ARNOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It sounded like a bad pickup line, but the most common icebreaker at a barbecue in the Santa Fe Dam Recreation Area Saturday was: "So who was your grandfather?" In fact, it was a logical question for the 350 or so members of the far-flung Ordonez family to ask as they gathered from across California, the Southwestern United States and Mexico to trace the family's roots and meet relatives from other branches of the family tree.
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