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Southwestern United States History

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NEWS
January 6, 1993 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
California has become home to so many immigrants that it is perhaps only fitting that the land on which they dwell is also composed of immigrants. The mountain ranges that make this state one of the most spectacular regions in the world are relatively young, but many of the rocks from which they are built came here long ago and formed far away.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History will show that the group talking today at the Huntington Library about the old days is an open-minded bunch. They are taking note of Mexican women who helped shape the American West a century ago. And of gays who played a role in the California Gold Rush, Native Americans in Arizona who kept their culture alive against all odds and a religious group in New Mexico that survived hundreds of years of persecution.
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NEWS
December 1, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On April 13, 1989, Douglas Preston mounted a horse named King on the banks of a river in an isolated corner of southeastern Arizona and set out on a 1,000-mile odyssey to trace the footsteps of a 16th-Century Spanish conquistador. For Preston, a writer who recently moved from New York to the Southwest, the thought of riding horses over rugged mountains and vast deserts was a romantic one. What could be better than sleeping under the stars and listening to the coyotes howl?
NEWS
January 6, 1993 | LEE DYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
California has become home to so many immigrants that it is perhaps only fitting that the land on which they dwell is also composed of immigrants. The mountain ranges that make this state one of the most spectacular regions in the world are relatively young, but many of the rocks from which they are built came here long ago and formed far away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
History will show that the group talking today at the Huntington Library about the old days is an open-minded bunch. They are taking note of Mexican women who helped shape the American West a century ago. And of gays who played a role in the California Gold Rush, Native Americans in Arizona who kept their culture alive against all odds and a religious group in New Mexico that survived hundreds of years of persecution.
NEWS
December 1, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On April 13, 1989, Douglas Preston mounted a horse named King on the banks of a river in an isolated corner of southeastern Arizona and set out on a 1,000-mile odyssey to trace the footsteps of a 16th-Century Spanish conquistador. For Preston, a writer who recently moved from New York to the Southwest, the thought of riding horses over rugged mountains and vast deserts was a romantic one. What could be better than sleeping under the stars and listening to the coyotes howl?
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