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Soviet Acrobatic Revue

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1991 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five weeks on the road with the Soviet Acrobatic Revue, troupe member Anatoly Yamahanov concedes he's eager to be back in the U.S.S.R. But performing the same routine--five times a week--is neither monotonous nor exhausting, he said recently. In fact, he'd rather have a busier schedule. "We like our job, I enjoy my work," he said cheerfully through interpreter and fellow troupe member Elena Lopatina.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1991 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five weeks on the road with the Soviet Acrobatic Revue, troupe member Anatoly Yamahanov concedes he's eager to be back in the U.S.S.R. But performing the same routine--five times a week--is neither monotonous nor exhausting, he said recently. In fact, he'd rather have a busier schedule. "We like our job, I enjoy my work," he said cheerfully through interpreter and fellow troupe member Elena Lopatina.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
For Sergei Alexandrovich Pavlov, who clowns his way through the Soviet Acrobatic Revue, comedy is no laughing matter. Pavlov, 31, has never heard of Woody Allen. And yet, the red-haired, freckle-faced clown, who dreams of writing, directing and starring in his own movies, looks and talks like a Soviet version of--who else?--Woody Allen. Pavlov is the single clown in the Soviet Acrobatic Revue, which makes its American debut Tuesday at the Old Globe Theatre, with performances through Dec. 17.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
For Sergei Alexandrovich Pavlov, who clowns his way through the Soviet Acrobatic Revue, comedy is no laughing matter. Pavlov, 31, has never heard of Woody Allen. And yet, the red-haired, freckle-faced clown, who dreams of writing, directing and starring in his own movies, looks and talks like a Soviet version of--who else?--Woody Allen. Pavlov is the single clown in the Soviet Acrobatic Revue, which makes its American debut Tuesday at the Old Globe Theatre, with performances through Dec. 17.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Soviet Acrobats Sub for Peking Troupe: ThePeking Acrobats, who were to have performed Jan. 31 at El Camino College's Marsee Auditorium, were refused exit visas and they will be replaced on that date by the Soviet Acrobatic Revue. According to International Attractions Inc., the Peking troupe's U.S. tour was canceled due to the current political situation in the People's Republic of China. Tickets for the Peking Acrobats will be honored for the Soviet performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
They twirl, they leap, they balance, they dance. They are the Soviet Acrobatic Revue at the Old Globe Theatre, and if the American premiere of this Soviet import proves anything, it is that a circus in any country is still a circus. Thus said, this one-ring troupe provides a dandy little divertissement, with talented performers who are eager to please.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
For Sergei Alexandrovich Pavlov, who clowns his way through the Soviet Acrobatic Revue, comedy is no laughing matter. Pavlov, 31, has never heard of Woody Allen. And yet, the red-haired, freckle-faced clown, who dreams of writing, directing and starring in his own movies, looks and talks like a Soviet version of--who else?--Woody Allen. Pavlov is the single clown in the Soviet Acrobatic Revue, which makes its American debut tonight at the Old Globe Theatre, with performances through Dec. 17.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
"The trade of critic, in literature, music, and the drama, is the most degraded of trades," wrote Mark Twain. In other words, nobody loves a critic until glowing reviews come in. Well, the glowing reviews have come in for the Soviet Arts Festival theater presentations of the Maly Theatre's "Brothers and Sisters" at the Old Globe Theatre and Nicolai Kolyada's "Slingshot" at the San Diego Repertory Theatre. And the phones haven't stopped ringing at the theaters since.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1989 | NANCY CHURNIN
Mayor Maureen O'Connor did not welcome Don Hughes as part of the official Soviet Arts Festival when he presented the Red Army Chorus and Soviet rock star Vladimir Kuzmin, but no matter. The Red Army Chorus pulled in an audience of 16,000, Hughes' largest ever in San Diego; Kuzmin signed an exclusive contract with Hughes' organization, International Attractions, and the promoter intends to keep the exchange going with more Soviet fare through next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1989 | MARY HELEN BERG
You are exiled to the proverbial desert island and may take only a few works by your favorite composers. Forced to choose, would you pick Brahms? Bach? Mozart? These three composers--with Beethoven close behind--garnered the most top picks in an informal survey of musicians conducted by Stephen Shelton of North Hollywood. "It started out as a parlor game, really," said Shelton, a retired financial officer and former bass with the William Hall Chorale.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worldwide, 1991 will see the commemoration of the bicentennial of Mozart's death, at the tragically early age of 35. Locally, the Orange County Philharmonic Society takes the lead in scheduling concerts in honor of this commemoration, including a number of promising operatic events: * Christopher Perick will conduct the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra in a concert version of Mozart's "Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail" on March 6 at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
They know each other quite well for all three are rivals in the same field--doing their best to capitalize on the new, open Soviet Union by importing music and dance performers into the United States. They conduct business in that tight little enclave of mid-town Manhattan that's virtually a baton's throw from Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center, and these days might just as easily bump into each other on Moscow's Gorky Street as on Manhattan's West 57th Street.
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