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Soviet American Germanium Experiment

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER VAUGHAN, Vaughan is a free-lance science writer based in Alexandria, Va
Physicists say that they are drawing close to solving a mystery about the sun that has stumped them for more than 20 years. The protagonists in this story are neutrinos, subatomic particles that have no charge and little or no mass and are very difficult to detect. Since 1968, scientists have been at a loss to explain why the sun seems to produce fewer than half the neutrinos it should.
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MAGAZINE
November 22, 1992 | JANET BAILEY, Janet Bailey, who is based in New Mexico, is writing a book about Los Alamos National Laboratory
"HEAR THE MOUNTAIN BREATHING." Vladimir Gavrin, a nuclear physicist, stands two miles inside Mt. Andyrchi in southern Russia, listening to underground streams that surge through seams in the rock only a few yards above the tunnel that houses his laboratory. From inside the tunnel, the mountain does seem like a living thing. The walls are warm--105 degrees Fahrenheit--heated by the Earth's primordial furnace.
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MAGAZINE
November 22, 1992 | JANET BAILEY, Janet Bailey, who is based in New Mexico, is writing a book about Los Alamos National Laboratory
"HEAR THE MOUNTAIN BREATHING." Vladimir Gavrin, a nuclear physicist, stands two miles inside Mt. Andyrchi in southern Russia, listening to underground streams that surge through seams in the rock only a few yards above the tunnel that houses his laboratory. From inside the tunnel, the mountain does seem like a living thing. The walls are warm--105 degrees Fahrenheit--heated by the Earth's primordial furnace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER VAUGHAN, Vaughan is a free-lance science writer based in Alexandria, Va
Physicists say that they are drawing close to solving a mystery about the sun that has stumped them for more than 20 years. The protagonists in this story are neutrinos, subatomic particles that have no charge and little or no mass and are very difficult to detect. Since 1968, scientists have been at a loss to explain why the sun seems to produce fewer than half the neutrinos it should.
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